ACESULFAME K

Acesulfame potassium = Acesulfame K = Ace K = E950

CAS Number: 55589-62-3
EC Number: 259-715-3
E number: E950 (glazing agents, ...)
Chemical formula: C4H4KNO4S
Molar mass: 201.242

Acesulfame potassium, also known as acesulfame K (K is the symbol for potassium) or Ace K, is a synthetic calorie-free sugar substitute (artificial sweetener) often marketed under the trade names Sunett and Sweet One. 
In the European Union, Acesulfame K is known under the E number (additive code) E950.
Acesulfame K was discovered accidentally in 1967 by German chemist Karl Clauss at Hoechst AG (now Nutrinova).
In chemical structure, acesulfame potassium is the potassium salt of 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide. 
Acesulfame K is a white crystalline powder with molecular formula C4H4KNO4S and a molecular weight of 201.24 g/mol.

What is Acesulfame K?
Acesulfame K’s up to 200 times sweeterTrusted Source than table sugar, but acesulfame potassium has a sour reputation.
Acesulfame potassium is an artificial sweetener also known as Ace-K. 
Acesulfame-K (Ace-K) is one of the major low-calorie artificial sweeteners in the modern diet.

Also known as acesulfame K or Ace-K, the ingredient is a calorie-free sweetener found in sugar-free products. 
Alone, Acesulfame K’s a white crystal powder with a slightly bitter after-taste. 
Because of this taste, Acesulfame K’s often blended with other sweeteners like sucralose (used in Splenda) or aspartame (used in Equal) — both controversial in their own right.
Ace-K can be found in soft drinks, protein shakes, drink mixes, frozen desserts, baked goods, candy, gum, and tabletop sweeteners.

Product uses of Acesulfame K:
Acesulfame potassium can be used in flavor fermented milks, frozen drinks, canned fruits, jams, preserved fruits, pickled vegetables, roasted seeds and nuts, candies, baked food , table sweeteners, condiments, beverages, jellies and other food fields.

Since Acesulfame K's more than 200 times sweeter than sugar, manufacturers can use far less acesulfame potassium, lowering the amount of calories and carbohydrates in a product. 
Ace-K is often combined with other artificial sweeteners and most often used in: 
-Soda
-Frozen desserts
-Candies
-Drinks
-Baked goods 
-Chewing gum
-Sauces‌
-Yogurt

Acesulfame Potassium (Ace-K), C4H4KNO4S, is a calorie-free artificial sweetener, also known as Acesulfame K. 
Acesulfame K is a white, odorless, freely flowing powder having an intense sweet taste. 
Acesulfame K was discovered accidentally in 1967 by German chemist Karl Clauss.
Acesulfame Potassium (Ace-K) is 180-200 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar), as sweet as aspartame, about half as sweet as saccharin, and one-quarter as sweet as sucralose. 
A 3% solution is approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. 
Acesulfame K is freely soluble in water and slightly soluble in ethanol. 

Like saccharin, Acesulfame K has a slightly bitter aftertaste, especially at high concentrations.
Acesulfame Potassium (Ace-K) is often blended with other sweeteners (usually sucralose or aspartame). 
These blends are reputed to give a more sugar-like taste whereby each sweetener masks the other’s aftertaste, and/or exhibits a synergistic effect by which the blend is sweeter than its components.
Unlike aspartame, Acesulfame Potassium (Ace-K) is stable under heat, even under moderately acidic or basic conditions, allowing Acesulfame K to be used in baking, or in products that require a long shelf life. 
In carbonated drinks, Acesulfame K is almost always used in conjunction with another sweetener, such as aspartame or sucralose. 
Acesulfame K is also used as a sweetener in protein shakes and pharmaceutical products, especially chewable and liquid medications, where Acesulfame K can make the active ingredients more palatable.

Acesulfame potassium is sold under the brand names of Sunett and Sweet One. 
Acesulfame K keeps its sweetness at high temperatures, making Acesulfame K a good sweetener for baking.
Ace-K is a calorie-free sweetener that is 200x sweeter than table sugar. 
Ace-K is used in many diet products, including sugar-free versions of Red Bull, Rockstar, Bang, and Monster. 
Ace-K is known for having a bitter aftertaste, which often leads to Acesulfame K being paired with other artificial sweeteners. 

Artificial sweeteners like acesulfame potassium are popular because they're often far sweeter than natural sugar, meaning you can use less in a recipe. 
Acesulfame K also offer some health benefits, including:

Weight management. 
A teaspoon of sugar has approximately 16 calories. 
This may not sound like much until you realize that the average soda has 10 teaspoons of sugar, which adds up to around 160 additional calories. 
As a sugar substitute, acesulfame potassium has 0 calories, allowing you to cut a lot of those extra calories from your diet. 
Fewer calories makes Acesulfame K easier for you to drop extra pounds or to stay at a healthy weight.‌

Diabetes. 
Artificial sweeteners don’t raise your blood sugar levels like sugar does. 
If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor about using artificial sweeteners before you use any.

Dental health. 
Sugar can contribute to tooth decay, but sugar substitutes like acesulfame potassium don’t.

Acesulfame potassium — also known as acesulfame K, or ace K — is an artificial sweetener. 
In Europe, people sometimes refer to Acesulfame K as E950.
Manufacturers sell acesulfame potassium under the brand names Sweet One and Sunett.
Acesulfame K is around 200 times sweeter than sugar and is used to give food and drinks a sweet taste without adding calories (2Trusted Source).

Where is Acesulfame K used?
Ace-K is primarily used in beverages in blends with other sweeteners and is a component in most of today’s diet soft-drinks, sports drinks and flavored waters. 
Blends of Ace-K are also found in many food applications including desserts, puddings, dairy products, and baked goods.

Acesulfame works by stimulating the sweet-taste receptors on the tongue, so a person can enjoy the taste of sweetness without consuming sugar.
Manufacturers usually blend acesulfame potassium with other sweeteners such as aspartame and sucralose. 
They do this to mask the bitter aftertaste that sweeteners can have on their own.
Interestingly, the body may not break down or store acesulfame potassium as Acesulfame K does with other food. 
Instead, the body absorbs Acesulfame K and then passes Acesulfame K, unchanged, through urine.

Which foods contain Acesulfame K?
Acesulfame potassium is a highly versatile artificial sweetener that manufacturers use in a wide range of foods and drinks.
Unlike similar sweeteners, such as aspartame, Acesulfame K is stable when heated. 
Because of this property, many baked goods contain acesulfame potassium.

Examples of foods containing acesulfame potassium include:
-beverages, including soda, fruit juices, non-carbonated drinks, and alcohol
-tabletop sweeteners
-dairy products
-ice cream
-desserts
-jam, jelly, and marmalade
-baked goods
-toothpaste and mouthwash
-chewing gum
-marinades
-yogurt and other milk products
-breakfast cereals
-salad dressings and sauces
-condiments

Acesulfame-K (Ace-K) is a calorie-free sweetener that is 200 times sweeter than sugar. 
Acesulfame K is used in various food products available in the market. 
Ace-K is one of the five artificial sweeteners approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
A variety of drinks and foods consist of Ace-K, which includes table-top sweeteners, dairy products, chewing gum, jam, frozen desserts, baked goods, and cola and fizzy drinks. 
Acesulfame K is mainly used in baked items as Acesulfame K retains its sweetness even at very high temperatures.
Ace-K cannot be stored in the human body or broken down during digestion; after consumption, Acesulfame K is rapidly absorbed and excreted by the body without any change.

Chemical formula: C4H4KNO4S
Molar mass: 201.242
Appearance: white crystalline powder
Density: 1.81 g/cm3
Melting point: 225 °C (437 °F; 498 K)
Solubility in water: 270 g/L at 20 °C

Effects on blood sugar and insulin
Research has found that artificial sweeteners cause only minimal changes in blood sugar levels, and sources say they are safe for people with diabetes.

Properties
Acesulfame K is 200 times sweeter than sucrose (common sugar), as sweet as aspartame, about two-thirds as sweet as saccharin, and one-third as sweet as sucralose. 
Like saccharin, Acesulfame K has a slightly bitter aftertaste, especially at high concentrations. 
Kraft Foods patented the use of sodium ferulate to mask acesulfame's aftertaste.
Acesulfame K is often blended with other sweeteners (usually sucralose or aspartame). 

These blends are reputed to give a more sucrose-like taste whereby each sweetener masks the other's aftertaste, or exhibits a synergistic effect by which the blend is sweeter than Acesulfame Ks components.
Acesulfame potassium has a smaller particle size than sucrose, allowing for Acesulfame Ks mixtures with other sweeteners to be more uniform.
Unlike aspartame, acesulfame K is stable under heat, even under moderately acidic or basic conditions, allowing Acesulfame K to be used as a food additive in baking, or in products that require a long shelf life. 
Although acesulfame potassium has a stable shelf life, Acesulfame K can eventually degrade to acetoacetamide, which is toxic in high doses.
In carbonated drinks, Acesulfame K is almost always used in conjunction with another sweetener, such as aspartame or sucralose. 

Acesulfame K is also used as a sweetener in protein shakes and pharmaceutical products, especially chewable and liquid medications, where Acesulfame K can make the active ingredients more palatable. 
The acceptable daily intake of acesulfame potassium is listed as 15 mg/kg/day.
Acesulfame potassium is widely used in the human diet and excreted by the kidneys. 
Acesulfame K thus has been used by researchers as a marker to estimate to what degree swimming pools are contaminated by urine.
Other names for acesulfame K are potassium acesulfamate, potassium salt of 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxothiazin-4(3H)-one-2,3-dioxide, and potassium 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4(3H)-one-3-ate-2,2-dioxide.

Effect on body weight of Acesulfame K:
Acesulfame potassium provides a sweet taste with no caloric value. 
There is no high-quality evidence that using acesulfame potassium as a sweetener affects body weight or body mass index (BMI).

Definition of Acesulfame K:
ChEBI: A sulfamate ester that is 1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide substituted by a methyl group at position 6.

Discovery of Acesulfame K:
Acesulfame potassium was developed after the accidental discovery of a similar compound (5,6-dimethyl-1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide) in 1967 by Karl Clauss and Harald Jensen at Hoechst AG.
After accidentally dipping his fingers into the chemicals with which he was working, Clauss licked them to pick up a piece of paper.
Clauss is the inventor listed on a United States patent issued in 1975 to the assignee Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft for one process of manufacturing acesulfame potassium.
Subsequent research showed a number of compounds with the same basic ring structure had varying levels of sweetness. 
6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide had particularly favourable taste characteristics and was relatively easy to synthesize, so Acesulfame K was singled out for further research, and received Acesulfame Ks generic name (acesulfame-K) from the World Health Organization in 1978.
Acesulfame potassium first received approval for table top use in the United States in 1988.

IUPAC name
Potassium 6-methyl-2,2-dioxo-2H-1,2λ6,3-oxathiazin-4-olate

Other names
Acesulfame K; Ace K

Acesulfame K is a synthetic substance and the potassium salt of a sulfonate compound. 
Acesulfame K is approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose, but can give a bitter aftertaste, especially when used at high concentration. 
Acesulfame K is often used in combination with sucralose or aspartame to provide a more sucrose-like taste in soft drinks, shakes, and smoothies. 
This combination is also used to make pharmaceuticals more palatable. 
Acesulfame is moderately heat stable. 
This enables its use in baked foods. 
The ADI of acesulfame K is 15 mg per kg of body weight which is equivalent to about 1000 mg for a person weighing 165 lbs.

How is Acesulfame K made?
Ace-K is commercially made from the chemical reactions among sulfamic acid, diketene, triethylamine, acetic acid, sulfur trioxide and potassium hydroxide.

The following is the 5 steps brief manufacturing processes:
Step 1: the reaction among sulfamic acid, triethylamine and acetic acid to synthesize amidosulfamic acid salt.
Step 2: acetoacetamide salt formed by reacting amidosulfamic acid salt with diketene.
Step 3: reacting the acetoacetamide salt with a cyclizing agent sulfur trioxide to form a cyclic sulfur trioxide adduct.cyclic sulfur trioxide adduct
Step 4: obtaining acesulfame -H by hydrolyzing the cyclic sulfur trioxide adduct.
Step 5: neutralizing acesulfame-H with potassium hydroxide to obtain the final product.

What are the health benefits of Acesulfame K?
Ace-k is quickly excreted via the urine unchanged after absorption and no accumulation in our body. 
Acesulfame K contributes zero calorie, without raising insulin levels, and does not promote dental caries.

Zero Glycemic Index
Acesulfame k cannot be metabolized in the human body so Acesulfame K has a glycemic index with 0. 
That’s to say, Acesulfame K does not raise blood sugar and insulin levels and therefore Acesulfame K is safe for diabetics. 

Tooth friendly
Acesulfame K will not cause tooth decay so Acesulfame K is a suitable ingredient to be added in food for children.

Specification
Other Names: 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one-2,2-dioxide potassium salt
CAS Number: 55589-62-3
Chemical formula: C4H4KNO4S
Molecular Weight: 201.24

Appearance: White crystalline powder. 

Acesulfame potassium (also known as acesulfame K or Ace K) is a calorie-free, high intensity sweetener. 
Acesulfame K is stable under heat and in moderately acidic or basic conditions. 
This allows Acesulfame K to be used as a food additive in baking or in products that require a long shelf life.
A white, odorless, freely flowing powder, acesulfame potassium has an intense sweet taste: a 3% solution is approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. 
Acesulfame K is freely soluble in water and slightly soluble in ethanol.
Acesulfame potassium has been tested for close to 40 years, with more than 100 studies on safety and efficacy. 
These studies, including long-term animal feed tests, consistently show acesulfame potassium is a safe and effective no calorie sweetener. 
Acesulfame K does not promote tooth decay and is suitable for people with diabetes.

Sweetness
The sweetness of its 3% solution is approximately 200 times than table sugar, but like sodium saccharin, Acesulfame K has a slightly bitter aftertaste at high concentrations. 
Acesulfame K shares the same sweetness with aspartame, 2/3 sweet as sodium saccharin and 1/3 sweet as sucralose. 

Solubility : Very soluble in water (30g/100ml, 20℃) and slightly soluble ethanol.

Structure: AcesulfameK chemical structure

What are the uses of Acesulfame K?
Acesulfame K is commonly used in reduced sugar/calorie food, e.g. soft drinks, table top sweeteners, baked goods, confectionery and dairy products.
Acesulfame K has a bitter aftertaste when used alone so Acesulfame K is usually combined with aspartame to mask Acesulfame Ks metallic taste and exhibits a synergistic sweet effect, for example, in Pepsi’s zero sugar soda.
In Europe, there is an ingredient called “salt of aspartame-acesulfame”, which is made of two molecule aspartame with one molecule acesulfame K, with the E number E962. 
Ace k can also be blended with sucralose or sugar alcohols to generate a more sugar-like taste.
Ace k is widely used in carbonated drinks for its purpose of good sweet taste and zero calorie, and we can find this ingredient in the label of diet coke feisty cherry and coca-cola zero sugar of Coca-Cola’s products.
Also, ace k functions as a non-caloric and sugar free sweetener in energy drink, such as in Redbull and coffemate of Nestle.

Sweeteners are substances used as a dietary supplement to replace sugar. 
Consumers are concerned about the high levels of sugar, calories and cariogenicity in confectionery products, which is why the popularity of the so-called “Light“ products and „sugar-free“ products. 
Acesulfame K is a synthetic sweetener about 200 times sweeter than sugar. 
In the present work, an analysis of acesulfame K in cocoa and chocolate products was performed. 

For the determination of sweeteners acesulfame K, saccharin and aspartame in foodstuffs, a standardized reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection was used. 
A cocoa matrix-specific compound was observed in all chocolate products analyzed for acesulfame K. 
Interference did not correspond to acesulfame K on the UV spectrum and could not be removed by two-step purification. 
The comparison of the spectral characteristics allowed to avoid a misleading result for the presence of acesulfame K in chocolate and cocoa products.

CAS Number: 55589-62-3
ChEMBL: ChEMBL1351474 
ChemSpider: 55940 
ECHA InfoCard: 100.054.269 
EC Number: 259-715-3
E number: E950 (glazing agents, ...)
PubChem CID: 23683747
UNII: 23OV73Q5G9 
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID1030606

Acesulfame potassium (also known as acesulfame K or ace-K) is a zero-calorie sugar substitute that has been used in foods sold in the United States since 1988.
Acesulfame Potassium, or Ace-K, is a zero-calorie sweetener found in foods and drinks.

What is acesulfame potassium made from? 
Acesulfame K’s made by combining acetoacetic acid and potassium, which helps form a highly stable, crystalline sweetener.
While Acesulfame K does contain very small amounts of potassium, as essential nutrient that has many benefits, Acesulfame K’s not enough to have any health-promoting potassium benefits.

Is acesulfame potassium natural or synthetic? 
Acesulfame K’s considered an artificial/synthetic sweetener, since Acesulfame K’s man-made in a lab using chemical synthesis.

Acesulfame potassium is a type of potassium salt. 
Acesulfame K is a white crystalline powder 200 times sweeter than sugar that is commonly used as an artificial sweetener in foods and drinks. 

Other names for acesulfame potassium include:
-Ace-K
-Acesulfame K
-E950

What is Acesulfame-Potassium?
Acesulfame potassium, or Ace-K, is an artificial, high-intensity sweetener that is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar. 
Ace-K is not metabolized by the body and therefore has no caloric content.

Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener that has been used in foods and beverages around the world for 15 years. 
The ingredient, which is 200 times sweeter than sugar, has been used in numerous foods in the United States since 1988. 
In the U.S., Acesulfame K is used in such products as candies, baked goods, frozen desserts, beverages, dessert mixes and tabletop sweeteners. 
Acesulfame potassium, which is also known as acesulfame K, is often used in combination with other low-calorie sweeteners because Acesulfame K enhances the sweet taste of foods and beverages.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other leading health organizations have found the ingredient to be safe for all segments of the population. 
More than 90 studies have demonstrated the safety of acesulfame potassium. 
The ingredient is currently used in more than 4,000 foods and beverages in about 90 countries around the world

What is acesulfame potassium?
Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener that is 200 times sweeter than sugar. 
The sweetener is used in a wide variety of foods in the United States.

Why is acesulfame potassium used?
Acesulfame potassium offers consumers a greater choice of low calorie or reduced sugar foods that can help them manage their calorie intake. 
Acesulfame potassium can be used in baking because Acesulfame K is stable, retaining Acesulfame Ks sweetness at normal baking temperatures. 
The sweetener, which can be used alone, often is blended with other low-calorie sweeteners to produce a more sugar-like taste than that of any of the low-calorie sweeteners alone.

What kinds of food products contain acesulfame potassium?
Acesulfame potassium is currently used in more than 4,000 products around the world. 
In the United States, acesulfame potassium is approved for use in candies, tabletop sweeteners, chewing gums, beverages, dessert and dairy product mixes, baked goods, alcoholic beverages, syrups, refrigerated and frozen desserts, and sweet sauces and toppings. 

Use: Acesulfame potassium is primarily used in the food and beverage industry. 
Acesulfame K occasionally is used in personal care products such as toothpaste, as well as certain vitamins and supplements.

Why is acesulfame potassium used in sweetener blends? 
Acesulfame potassium is often used in sweetener blends to produce a more sugar-like taste in a food or beverage. 
The ingredient also helps the blend retain Acesulfame Ks sweetness during baking or heat processing, which is important for preparing foods, such as cookies and candies. 
Acesulfame potassium helps blends sustain their sweetness over time, thereby increasing the sweetness shelf life of products. 
In addition, foods containing blends of acesulfame potassium contain up to 40 percent less total sweetener.

Can you cook and bake with acesulfame potassium?
Yes. Because of its stability, acesulfame potassium retains Acesulfame Ks sweetness at normal baking temperatures and in combination with acidic ingredients in foods and beverages.

What Is Acesulfame Potassium Used In?
Acesulfame potassium is one of the most stable artificial sweeteners on the market. 
With a melting point of 437 degrees Fahrenheit, Acesulfame K is ideal for baked goods and shelf-stable products such as protein cookies and protein bars.

Acesulfame Ks intense sweetness also means that only small amounts are necessary to sweeten a product. 
Combined with the fact that Acesulfame K has no caloric value, Acesulfame K is a popular choice for beverages as well.

In addition to being sold straight as a sugar alternative, Ace-K can regularly be found in:
-Diet sodas
-Fruit juices
-Alcoholic beverages
-Dairy products
-Protein powders and shakes
-Sauces, dressings, and marinades
-Powdered drink mixes
-Baked goods
-Cereals 
-Dessert mixes
-Frozen desserts, including ice cream
-Condiments
-Fruit spreads such as jams and jellies
-Candy
-Gum
-Personal care products including toothpaste & mouthwash

Acesulfame potassium mixes well with other artificial sugars. 
Acesulfame K is often used in combination in commercial products, as this can mask the bitter aftertaste that artificial sweeteners have when used alone.
Acesulfame-K is very sweet-tasting sugar substitute that’s completely calorie-free, and like most artificial sweeteners there’s some controversy about their consumption in many different groups, including vegans.

Acesulfame-K: A non-nutritive, non-caloric sweetener which is also called acesulfame potassium (K stands for potassium). 
Approximately 130 to 200 times sweeter than table sugar, Acesulfame K is a white, odorless, crystalline substance which is not metabolized by the body. 
When ingested, Acesulfame K is eliminated unchanged in the urine. 
Since Acesulfame K is not absorbed and does not provide energy (calories) to the body, Acesulfame K is called a “non-nutritive” sweetener.

While Ace-K shows up on ingredient lists, no special warnings or notices of Acesulfame Ks presence are required by law on product packaging or food labels. 
As such, many Americans consume Acesulfame K daily without being aware of the fact. 

How is acesulfame potassium made?
Acesulfame potassium is made from a process that involves the transformation of an organic intermediate, acetoacetic acid, and Acesulfame Ks combination with the naturally occurring mineral, potassium, to form a highly stable, crystalline sweetener.

Acesulfame K is proposed for use as a table-top sweetener, and for use in soft drinks, fruit preparations, desserts, breakfast cereals, chewing gum, and other food applications appear to be possible. 
Based on data for food consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany, and estimated levels of use in these specified foods, the probable mean daily intake has been estimated as 470 mg/day.

Chemical properties
Acesulfame K appears as colorless to white crystalline powder, being odorless with a strong sweetness which is about 150 times that of the sucrose; the flavor properties are similar as that of saccharin. 
Acesulfame K has bitter at high concentrations and has a good mixing property with sugar alcohols and sucrose, etc., being stable as well. 
Acesulfame K has a melting point of about 225 °C, the maximum absorption spectrum of 227nm and density 1.83g/cm3 (loose density 1.1~1.3kg/dm3). 
Acesulfame K is non-hygroscopic, being stable at room temperature, easily soluble in water (30g/100ml, 20 ℃), slightly soluble in ethanol and other organic solvents.

Uses of Acesulfame K:
Non-nutritional sweetener, being able to be widely used in various foods, even in drinks of Ph3.0, Acesulfame K can also be used for beverages, food, health products and so on food sweeteners.
Acesulfame belongs to the fourth generation synthetic sweeteners with single administration accompanied with a certain bitter taste. 
Acesulfame-K is a non-nutritive sweetener also termed acesulfame potassium. 
Acesulfame K is a white, crystalline product that is 200 times sweeter than sucrose.
Acesulfame K is not metabolized in the body. 
Acesulfame K has some metallic off-tastes. 
Acesulfame K is readily soluble and heat and acid stable. 
Acesulfame K provides a synergistic sweetening effect combined with other sweeteners. 
Acesulfame K is used in beverages, desserts, confectionery, and bakery products.

Acesulfame K has a synergistic effect when being used in combination with aspartame or cyclamate and being able to mask the bitter taste. 
After intake of the human body, Acesulfame K is not absorbed and does not produce heat, being suitable for patients with diabetes and obesity. 
Acesulfame K can be used as pastry, jam (excluding canned food), pickles, candy, candied fruit, beverage, ice cream and jelly candy with the maximum dosage of 0.3g/kg; it can also be used as table sweetener (flake or powder) with 40 mg per tablet or per packet.

Production method of Acesulfame K:
There are many patents on the preparation of acesulfame, here are four methods.

Aminosulfonic acid and diketene method
Take aminosulfonic acid, triethylamine, diketene and potassium hydroxide as raw material for synthesis. 9.7 g (0.1 mol) of sulfamic acid was added to 16 mL (0.12 mol) of triethylamine and stirred until complete dissolution. 
8 mL 0.104 mol of diketene was added drop wise at 0 ° C, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature until completion of the reaction. 
Add hexane for precipitation and further refinement and the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to obtain 27 to 28 g of a syrup in a yield of 95.7 to 99.0%. 
The slurry and SO3 were simultaneously added to the container containing CH2Cl2 for stirring continuously of 1-5 hours before the removal of solvent under reduced pressure. 
The residue was treated with methanol-potassium hydroxide solution under controlling Ph value of 8 to 10. 
The solvent was removed and dried to give acesulfame potassium salt in 69% yield. 
This method is easy to obtain raw materials with mild conditions but the process is complex and the yield is not high.

Aminosulfonyl fluoride and diketene method.
To a solution of 76 g (0.55 mol) of potassium carbonate powder and 500 mL of acetone, 57.8 mL (1.0 mol) of sulfamic acid fluoride was added, and 84.3 mL (1.1 mol) of diketene was added dropwise over 15 min. 
Stir for reaction at 0 °C for 30 min. 
The reaction is exothermic with the temperature be controlled below 30℃ until the CO2 is completely released before stopping the reaction. 
The reaction mixture was suction filtered and washed with a small amount of acetone to give the potassium salt of the colorless crystalline acetoacetylamino-N-sulfonyl fluoride. 
The crystal was stirred together with 4 to 6 mol of methanol-potassium hydroxide solution to cyclize to obtain the acesulfame potassium salt in a yield of 93% of the theoretical amount. 
This method is easier to obtain raw materials with mild process conditions. 
The operation is also not complicated, being the ideal preparation method.

Acetoacetamide and fluorinated sulfuryl fluoride method.
Take acetoacetamide, potassium carbonate, fluorinated sulfuryl fluoride and potassium hydroxide as raw materials; (0.1 mol) of acetoacetamide and 69 g (0.5 mol) of potassium carbonate were added to 150 mL of acetone and 8 mL of water. 
After stirring uniformly, 15.3 g (0.15 mol) of fluorinated sulfuryl fluoride gas was introduced at room temperature for reaction at which point the reaction mixture was allowed to warm to 40 ° C and stirred for 2 h before suction filtration. 
The filter cake was put into an excess of hydrochloric acid solution of ice to dissolve and react and then extracted with ethyl acetate. 
The extract was dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to obtain acesulfame. 
Acesulfame K will react with methanol-potassium hydroxide solution to obtain acesulfame potassium salt with drying to get 14.1 g finished product with the yield of 86.5% of the theoretical amount.
This method is not harsh reaction conditions, the yield is high, but some raw materials are not easy to get.

Acetoacetamide and sulfur trioxide method.
In an inert organic or inorganic solvent, send through SO3 into acetoacetamide for recycling condensation, generating acetoacetyl sulfamic acid. 
After separation, it is reacted with potassium hydroxide to derive the products. 
Dissolve 5.1 g (50 mmol) acetoacetamide in 50mLCH2Cl2; dissolve 8 mL (200 mmo1) liquid SO3 in 50 mL Mlch2Cl2; then at-60 ℃, then drop the former one to the latter for stirring reaction of 2h.
Add 50 mL acetoacetamide and water and the organic phase was separated after extraction and further subject to aqueous phase extraction with ethyl acetate for twice and combined into the organic phase. 
After drying over anhydrous sodium sulfate, ethyl acetate was recovered by evaporation. 
The residue was dissolved in methanol and neutralized with methanol-potassium hydroxide solution. 
Acesulfame potassium salt was then precipitated and dried, yielding 3.1 g of product in a yield of 31% of the theoretical amount. 
This method needs to be carried out at low temperature, and the yield is not high.
Acesulfame K can be obtained through the addition reaction of fluorosulfonyl isocyanate (or chlorosulfonyl isocyanate) with various active methylene compounds (including α-unsubstituted ketone, β-diketone, β-keto acid and β-ketoester, etc.) addition .
For example, from the addition reaction between tert-butyl acetoacetate and fluorosulfonyl isocyanate.

SUNETTE
Ansaimi
Anselmi.
SWEET ONE
Sunett(R)
Acesulfam
acetosulfam
ACESULFAME K
ACESULFANE-K
ACESULFAME, FCC

Acesulfame K (synonyms: Acesulfam K; Potassium salt of 6-methyl-1, 2,3-oxathiazine-4(3H)-one-2,3-dioxide; Potassium salt of 3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4-one-2,2-dioxide; Acetosulfam) is an artificial sweetener, approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar. 
Acesulfame K is a white, odourless, crystalline powder.

Application issues with Acesulfame-Potassium
Ace-K has an intense but short sweetness profile which requires a secondary sweetener to achieve a uniform sweetness profile. 
Ace-K also suffers from a noticeable bitter after taste which lingers even after its sweetness has dissipated.

Flavor: characteristic
Sugar Substitutes, Chewing Gum, Dairy Products, Confections, Baking Food, Yogurt, Desserts, Alcoholic Beverages, Beverage Powder, Instant Coffee, Chai Tea, Gelatins, Puddings, Ice Cream, Cosmetics, Feed, Pharmaceutical.

Description    
ADI 15 mg/kg (1991). 
Intense-type sweetener permitted at 300-5500 ppm in foods. 
Sweetness approx. 
200 x sucrose Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free artificial sweetener, also known as Acesulfame K or Ace K (K being the symbol for potassium), and marketed under the trade names Sunett and Sweet One. 
In the European Union, Acesulfame K is known under the E number (additive code) E950. 
Acesulfame K was discovered accidentally in 1967 by German chemist Karl Clauss at Hoechst AG (now Nutrinova). 
In chemical structure, acesulfame potassium is the potassium salt of 6-methyl-1,2,3- oxathiazine-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide. 
Acesulfame K is a white crystalline powder with molecular formula C4H4KNO4S and a molecular weight of 201.24

How does the body handle acesulfame potassium?
Acesulfame potassium is not metabolized or stored in the body. 
After Acesulfame K is consumed, Acesulfame K is quickly absorbed by the body and then rapidly excreted unchanged.

Is acesulfame potassium safe?
Yes. Acesulfame potassium is safe and suitable for all segments of the population. 
The FDA, which is the governmental agency responsible for ensuring the safety of all foods, has approved acesulfame potassium for use in numerous food products on multiple separate occasions since 1988. 
The agency based Acesulfame Ks decisions on a large body of scientific evidence that demonstrates the safety of the ingredient.

Have other regulatory bodies reviewed the safety of acesulfame potassium?
Yes. Acesulfame potassium has been approved for use in about 90 countries. 
For example, Acesulfame K is widely used in foods and beverages in the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia and Canada. 
In addition, acesulfame potassium has been reviewed and found safe by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the World Health Organization and the Scientific Committee for Food of the European Union.

Can people with diabetes use acesulfame potassium?
Yes. The American Diabetes Association has said that non-nutritive sweeteners approved by the FDA are safe to consume by people with diabetes.

Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)
Acesulfame potassium is approved for use in food as a non-nutritive sweetener. 
Acesulfame K is included in the ingredient list on the food label as acesulfame K, acesulfame potassium, or Ace-K. 
Acesulfame K is about 200 times sweeter than sugar and is often combined with other sweeteners.
FDA approved acesulfame potassium for use in specific food and beverage categories in 1988 (53 FR 28379), and in 2003 approved Acesulfame K as a general purpose sweetener and flavor enhancer in food, except in meat and poultry, under certain conditions of use. 
Acesulfame K is heat stable, meaning that Acesulfame K stays sweet even when used at high temperatures during baking, making Acesulfame K suitable as a sugar substitute in baked goods.
Acesulfame potassium is typically used in frozen desserts, candies, beverages, and baked goods. 
More than 90 studies support Acesulfame Ks safety.

CAS Number: 55589-62-3
Molecular Weight: 201.24
Beilstein/REAXYS Number: 3637857
EC Number: 259-715-3
MDL number: MFCD00043833
PubChem Substance ID: 24870723
E Number: E950

Are Acesulfame Potassium and Aspartame the Same?
No. Both acesulfame potassium and aspartame are artificial sweeteners approved for human consumption by the FDA. 
Both have about the same degree of sweetness.
But aspartame is a methyl ester instead of a potassium salt. 
Aspartame was approved by the FDA around twenty years before acesulfame potassium and is less stable and therefore is used in different commercial products. 

potassium;6-methyl-2,2-dioxo-1-oxa-2?^{6}-thia-3-azanidacyclohex-5-en-4-one
H-D-TRP-OETHCL
MLS006010910
INS NO.950
CHEMBL1351474
DTXSID1030606
Acesulfame K, analytical standard
INS-950
HMS3264B22
HY-D0195
Tox21_111001
Tox21_202423
Tox21_303370
MFCD00043833
AKOS016015051
AKOS025310719
CCG-213614
potassium;6-methyl-2,2-dioxo-1-oxa-2lambda6-thia-3-azanidacyclohex-5-en-4-one

Uses:
Acesulfame K does not break down under high temperatures and so can be used in all processed foods and in cooking. 
Acesulfame K is in literally thousands of products. 
Other than as a zero calorie sweetener Acesulfame K has no other use.

Benefits:
Zero glycemic index. 
Not harmful to teeth. 
Suitable for diabetics.
Acesulfame K is one ofthe cheapest sweeteners. 
Works very well with other sweeteners including Aspartame and Sucralose. 
Acesulfame K is heat stable and is suitable for cooking and in processed foods.

Is Acesulfame Potassium Vegetarian or Vegan-Friendly?
Acesulfame potassium is a mineral salt.
As such, Acesulfame K does not contain any animal ingredients whatsoever. 
Acesulfame K is both vegetarian and vegan-diet friendly.

How much acesulfame potassium may people consume?
The FDA sets an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) level for many food ingredients that Acesulfame K clears for use. 
The ADI represents the amount of an ingredient that a person can safely consume each day over their entire lifetime. 
For acesulfame potassium, that amount has been set at 15 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of body weight. 
For a 60 kg (132- pound) person, this corresponds to 900 mg of acesulfame potassium every day for a lifetime or approximately 200 grams (one-half pound) of sugar equivalent each day. 
At current average usage levels in beverages, for example, this amount would correspond roughly to two gallons of beverage daily.

Appearance: white crystalline powder (exp)
Assay: 95.00 to 100.00
Heavey Metals: < 1 mg/kg Pb
Halogens: < 3 mg/kg F
Food Chemicals Codex Listed: No
Boiling Point: 332.00 to 334.00 °C. @ 760.00 mm Hg
Vapor Pressure: 0.000001 mmHg @ 25.00 °C. (est)
Flash Point: 311.00 °F. TCC ( 155.00 °C. )
logP (o/w): -0.310 (est)

Sweeteners approved for use in the UK include:
-acesulfame K
-aspartame
-saccharin
-sorbitol
-sucralose
-stevia
-xylitol

Acesulfame is a non-nutritive sweetener Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free artificial sweetener, also known as Acesulfame K or Ace K (K being the symbol for potassium), and marketed under the trade names Sunett and Sweet One. 
In the European Union, Acesulfame K is known under the E number (additive code) E950. 
Acesulfame K was discovered accidentally in 1967 by German chemist Karl Clauss at Hoechst AG (now Nutrinova). 
In chemical structure, acesulfame potassium is the potassium salt of 6-methyl-1,2,3- oxathiazine-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide. 
Acesulfame K has been approved for a variety of uses in more than 90 countries. 
In 1998, the FDA broadened the US approval of acesulfame K to allow Acesulfame Ks use in nonalcoholic beverages. 
Acesulfame K is often blended with sucralose and used to decrease the bitter aftertaste of aspartame. 
A wide range of low-calorie foods and drinks contain acesulfame K, including table-top sweeteners, chewing gum, jam, dairy products, frozen desserts, drinks and baked goods. 
Acesulfame K is not broken down when digested, nor is Acesulfame K stored in the body. 
After being consumed, Acesulfame K is quickly absorbed by the body and then rapidly excreted, unchanged.

Acesulfame potassium
55589-62-3
Acesulfame K
potassium 6-methyl-4-oxo-4H-1,2,3-oxathiazin-3-ide 2,2-dioxide
Acesulfame (potassium)
6-Methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide potassium salt
C4H4KNO4S
Acesulfame-K
NCGC00090729-01
Potassium 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide
DSSTox_CID_10606
DSSTox_RID_78852
DSSTox_GSID_30606
Acesulfame potassium (NF)
CAS-55589-62-3
Acesulfame potassium salt
E950
E 950

Chemical Formula: C4H5KNO4S
IUPAC name: potassium 6-methyl-3,4-dihydro-1,2λ⁶,3-oxathiazine-2,2,4-trione
InChI Identifier: InChI=1S/C4H5NO4S.K/c1-3-2-4(6)5-10(7,8)9-3;/h2H,1H3,(H,5,6);/q;+1
InChI Key: WBZFUFAFFUEMEI-UHFFFAOYSA-N
Isomeric SMILES: [K+].CC1=CC(=O)NS(=O)(=O)O1
Average Molecular Weight: 202.25
Monoisotopic Molecular Weight: 201.957635204

Acesulfame K is an artificial sweetener that was discovered in 1967.
Acesulfame K is also called Acesulfame Potassium. 
Acesulfame K is approx 200 times sweeter than sugar, though Acesulfame K has a slightly bitter aftertaste.
For this reason Acesulfame K is not usually used on its own. 
However its usefulness is that Acesulfame K tends to produce a good synergistic effect when mixed with other sweeteners. 
Acesulfame K is often used 40/60 with Aspartame and the two sweeteners tend to cancel out the bitter aftertaste of each other. 
(Cyclamate is often mixed 90/10 with Saccharin for the same reason.) 
Acesulfame K is sometimes mixed with other sweeteners. 
Occasionally Acesulfame K us used on Acesulfame K's own in flavored waters, where a low sweetness is required.

Recent studies show that, on average, 17 percent of children's daily caloric intake comes from sugar. 
With high sugar consumption directly linked to diabetes and a myriad of other health problems, it is no surprise that many families find themselves searching for alternatives to high-sugar treats. 
Nor is Acesulfame K any surprise that most of the readily-available treats they find contain artificial sweeteners.
As a high-quality grass-fed whey producer that prides itself in our knowledge of biochemistry, our natural sugar stance is neutral. 

Acesulfame potassium is a non-nutritive sweetener.
In moderation, raw sugar within a whole food is terrific and completely healthy. 
The issue with high-sugar treats is that the sugar is refined, stripped clean from the source, and isolated from the supporting fibers and nutrients that are otherwise available within the wholefood in which the sugar originates.
Acesulfame K wasn't that long ago when activists began pushing the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to classify sugar as a drug that requires regulation on the premise that, similar to other drugs, sugar is addictive and stimulates the brain.
Instead of the war on sugar spending their resources on educating the public around the impacts of refined sugars with a clear distinction from natural wholefood sugars, inculcation towards high-intensity sweeteners became the path of choice from the highest bidding lobbyist.

Identification test
Solubility: easily soluble in water. Very slightly soluble in ethanol. 
Measure Acesulfame K according to the OT-42 method.
Potassium test result (2 g of test residue): positive (IT-27).
UV absorbance: take 10 mg of the sample to dissolve in 1000 ml of water and the solution had a maximum absorption peak at 227 ± 2 nm (see GT-29).
Take 0.2 g of the sample, add 2 ml of the acetic acid test solution (TS-1) and 2 ml of water. 
Add several drops of 10% sodium hexachlorocyclohexane solution to this solution, after which there should be a yellow precipitate.

Content analysis
Accurately weighed 0.15g of pre-dried sample, dissolve in 50.0ml glacial acetic acid; apply 0.1mol/L perchloric acid for potentiometric titration; or add two drops of crystal violet test solution (TS-74), titrate with 0.1mol/L perchloric acid titration to blue-green end point, and maintain 30s to perform a blank test at the same time and correct the necessary error. 
Per mL, 0.1 mol/L perchloric acid is equivalent to 20.12 mg of acesulfame potassium (C4H4NO4SK).

NCGC00090729-02
NCGC00257361-01
NCGC00259972-01
AK128967
AS-12294
SMR001595518
Acesulfame K, for food analysis, >=99.0%
CS-0010111
E-950
FT-0621718
ST51037480
A16389
D08836
J10221
K-9918
Acesulfame potassium 1000 microg/mL in Acetonitrile
6-methyl-3H-1,2,3-oxathiazine-2,2,4-trione, potassium salt
Acesulfame potassium, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
Acesulfame potassium, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard
Acesulfame K, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
 

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