BHT (BUTYL HYDROXY TOLUENE )

BHT = Butyl hydroxy toluene = Butylated hydroxytoluene

CAS Number: 128-37-0
EC Number: 204-881-4
E number: E321 (antioxidants, ...)
Chemical formula: C15H24O
Molar mass: 220.356 g/mol

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene), also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene, is a lipophilic organic compound, chemically a derivative of phenol, that is useful for its antioxidant properties.
BHT is widely used to prevent free radical-mediated oxidation in fluids (e.g. fuels, oils) and other materials, and the regulations overseen by the U.S. F.D.A.—which considers BHT to be "generally recognized as safe"—allow small amounts to be added to foods. 
Despite this, and the earlier determination by the National Cancer Institute that BHT was noncarcinogenic in an animal model, societal concerns over its broad use have been expressed. 
BHT has also been postulated as an antiviral drug, but as of March 2020, use of BHT as a drug is not supported by the scientific literature and it has not been approved by any drug regulatory agency for use as an antiviral.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a synthetic phenolic compound mainly used as an antioxidant and preservative in the food industry. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used to prevent the lipid oxidation in oils and fat-containing foods.

Applications of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is listed by the NIH Hazardous Substances Data Bank under several categories in catalogues and databases, such as food additive, household product ingredient, industrial additive, personal care product/cosmetic ingredient, pesticide ingredient, plastic/rubber ingredient and medical/veterinary/research. 

APPLICATIONS of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
-As food additive, Antioxidant.
-Household product ingredient.
-Industrial additive.
-Personal care product/cosmetic ingredient.
-Pesticide ingredient.
-Plastic/Rubber ingredient.
-Medical/Veterinary.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a white solid of melting point 70°C with mild characteristic odor. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is readily fat-soluble and sparingly water soluble and is used primarily an antioxidant additive, extending the shelf life of products with unsaturated (and especially polyunsaturated) fatty acid moieties.
BHT, Butylated Hydroxytoluene, is an effective stabilizer and antioxidant for synthetic oils and fluids such as cutting, spindle, hydraulic and slushing oils, transformer oils, transmission fluids, and brake fluids.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as Food additive:
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is primarily used as an antioxidant food additive.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used as a preservative ingredient in some foods. 
With this usage BHT maintains freshness or prevents spoilage; BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may be used to decrease the rate at which the texture, color, or flavor of food changes.
Some food companies have voluntarily eliminated BHT from their products or have announced that they were going to phase it out.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as Antioxidant:
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used as an antioxidant in products such as metalworking fluids, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, rubber, transformer oils, and embalming fluid.
In the petroleum industry, where BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is known as the fuel additive AO-29, it is used in hydraulic fluids, turbine and gear oils, and jet fuels.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used to prevent peroxide formation in organic ethers and other solvents and laboratory chemicals.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is added to certain monomers as a polymerisation inhibitor to facilitate their safe storage.
Some additive products contain BHT as their primary ingredient, while others contain the chemical merely as a component of their formulation, sometimes alongside butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA).

Butylated Hydroxy Toluene, butylhydroxytoluene, or BHT is a fat-soluble organic compound in a white powder form that is primarily used as an antioxidant food additive and cosmetics and, pharmaceuticals. 
Technical applications include additives in jet fuels, rubber, petroleum products, electrical transformer oil, and embalming fluid. 
CAS # 128-37-0

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is commonly used in cosmetic formulations as an antioxidant. 
In addition to personal care products and makeup, it is also widely used in plastics and foods. 
BHT (or 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol) is a white to yellowish crystalline solid that prevents the oxidation of fats and oils, and helps to extend a product's shelf-life. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is produced by the reaction of p-cresol with isobutylene and sulfuric acid.

The key function of BHT is that of a stabilizer.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) inhibits the degradation of fats and oils through its antioxidant action and prevents rancidity. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)v is also a food additive, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS).
In cosmetic formulations, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is often used at concentrations ranging from 0.0001% to 0.5%.

Consumers seek safe, natural ingredients for skin, hair, body, and food products. 
Nowadays, more consumers read and research the information found on packaging labels including ingredient listings. 
There has been increased concern and caution amongst consumers with the use of synthetic additives in foods and cosmetics. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been questioned for safety and efficacy due to consumers' skepticism of additives of synthetic origin. 
In fact, a major manufacturer of cereals volunteered to remove BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) from its cereals due to negative concerns of consumers.
Based on toxicological studies it was concluded that BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may produce toxicity in high oral doses and can cause adverse effects in some organs using animal models.

Although there are some concerns about BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene), scientific research maintains that when used at low concentrations BHT is safe. 
Long-term use studies have substantiated the overall safety and efficacy of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene).
In skin permeation studies, it was demonstrated that BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has the ability to penetrate the skin; however, the amount absorbed does not appear to pass through the top layer of the skin, and it has been determined to be safe for use in cosmetics.
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It was also concluded that application of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) to the skin does not produce appreciable systemic levels of the molecule, and it does not result in widespread irritation, sensitization, or photosensitization. 
In addition to its antioxidant protection of cosmetic preparations, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) provides positive benefits for the skin. 
In one study, it was shown that BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may have photoprotective properties and possibly impede photocarcinogenesis when used in conjunction with carotenoids, such as beta-carotene.

Although BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is still widely used, some companies are searching for alternatives with good toxicological and ecological profiles. 
Some possible alternatives are BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) analogues that offer strong stabilizer benefits, such as tocopherols and synthetic analogues.
Another option is to promote BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as a naturally sourced antioxidant. 
It has been shown that BHT can be produced in freshwater aquatic plants, such as phytoplankton.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been in use for a long time in consumer products. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)s safety profile has led to its inclusion in many products resulting in extensive use. 
Scientific data supports the safety of BHT for the consumer. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a mainstay of the cosmetics and food industry and is beneficial for the safe preservation of cosmetics, such as cleansers, lotions, make-up, and hairstyling products. 
Further research could discover even more beneficial uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene).

Composition:
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has a molecular formula of C15H24O, and a molecular weight of 220.34. 
Chemically BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is an alkylated phenol.

Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
At room temperature BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a white, odorless, low melting solid, with melting point 70°C. 
Specific gravity of the material is 1.048 (80°C). 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has a low vapor pressure (6.5 mm Hg at 120°C) and a high boiling point (265°C at 760 mm). 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is insoluble in water and freely soluble in various organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, toluene, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene and others. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is soluble in food oils and fats, and has good solubility in linseed oil.

What is BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)?
Butylated hydroxytoluene, commonly known as BHT, is an organic compound that is used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industry as an antioxidant. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a substituted derivative of phenol. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) helps to prevent the formation of free radicals and oxidation. 
When used in food products, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) delays oxidative rancidity of fats and oils, and prevents loss of activity of oil-soluble vitamins. 

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may be found in pharmaceutical gels, creams and liquid or gelatin capsules, tablets and other pharmaceutical dosage forms. 
The ability of oral BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) to lead to cancer is a controversial topic, but most food industries have replaced it with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). 
A large review from 2002 concluded that BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is safe for use on the skin in cosmetics.

How BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is made:
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is synthesized from p-cresol. 
The p-cresol is obtained from coal tar (25%), as a by-product of catalytic cracking of petroleum (11%), and by a number of synthetic processes (64%). 
A major synthetic route is by sulfonation of toluene followed by heating with sodium hydroxide. 
Toluene is obtained by distillation of petroleum.

The p-cresol is alkylated with isobutylene gas in an acid catalyzed reaction. 
Products and results are sensitive to the catalyst and conditions. 
In one process, p-cresol with 5% phosphoric acid is heated to 70°C. 

Isobutylene gas obtained by catalytic cracking and distillation of petroleum is bubbled through. 
The catalyst separates and is removed. 
The product is washed with sodium hydroxide. 
Crystals settle out in 46% yield.

In another process, p-cresol is heated to 40°C with 5% methanedisulfonic acid. 
Isobutylene is bubbled through for 6 hours. 
Upon cooling, the catalyst separates. 
The product is washed with sodium hydroxide solution. 
Crystals separate in 88% yield and are recrystallized from methanol.

Specific Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used as an antioxidant in food, animal feed, petroleum products, synthetic rubbers, plastics, animal and vegetable oils, and soaps. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is on the FDA Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is added to food such as dry breakfast cereals, potato flakes, enriched rice, and margarine. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also added to food packaging materials.

Action:
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is an antioxidant due to its ability to scavenge free radicals. 
Free radicals are very reactive species characterized by unpaired electrons. 
Free radicals initiate a chain reaction, reacting many times until the chain is terminated by electron pairing. 
Free radicals can be formed by thermal cleavage of a hydrocarbon chain or hydrocarbon reaction with oxygen or light.

Oxygen reacts with the double bonds present in insect pheromones forming peroxides. 
The peroxide bond is weak and is photochemically or thermally cleaved into two free radicals. 
At higher temperatures molecular oxygen can react directly with a hydrocarbon, removing a hydrogen atom and producing a free radical.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) protects pheromones by reacting much faster with free radicals than the pheromones do. 
Once formed, the phenolic free radical of BHT forms an inactive dimer or reacts once more with a free radical, terminating the chain. 
Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) terminates a free radical chain reaction, it is called a free radical scavenger or quencher.
Addition of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) to a pheromone formulation can increase the lifespan of the double bond system from 2 weeks to 8 weeks.

The activity of polarly localized PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers contributes to the formation of auxin gradients which guide plant growth, development, and tropic responses. 
Both the localization and abundance of PIN proteins in the plasma membrane depend on the regulation of PIN trafficking through endocytosis and exocytosis and are influenced by many external and internal stimuli, such as reactive oxygen species, auxin transport inhibitors, flavonoids and plant hormones. 
Here, we investigated the regulation of endosomal PIN cycling by using a Brefeldin A (BFA) assay to study the effect of a phenolic antioxidant ionol, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), on the endocytosis and exocytosis of PIN1 and PIN2. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is one of the most widely used antioxidants in the food and feed industries, and as such is commonly released into the environment; however, the effect of BHT on plants remains poorly characterized. 
Preincubation of Arabidopsis seedlings with BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) before BFA treatment strongly enhanced the internalization of PIN1 into BFA compartments. 
After the simultaneous application of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) and NAA, the NAA effect dominated PIN internalization suggesting the BHT effect occurred downstream to that of NAA. 

Washing seedlings with BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) after BFA treatment prevented the release of PIN1 from BFA compartments back to the plasma membrane, indicating that BHT application inhibited PIN1 exocytosis. 
Overall rates of PIN2 internalization were less pronounced than those of PIN1 in seedlings pre-incubated with BHT before BFA treatment, and PIN2 exocytosis was not inhibited by BHT, indicating a specific activity of BHT on PIN1 exocytosis. 
Comparison of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) activity with other potential stimuli of PIN1 and PIN2 trafficking [e.g., H2O2 (ROS), salt stress, reduced glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol (DTT), and flavonoids] showed that BHT has a new activity distinct from the activities of other regulators of PIN trafficking. 
The findings support BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as a potentially interesting pharmacological tool for dissecting PIN trafficking and auxin transport.

Combinations:
For food use, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is combined with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) as a margarine preservative. 
In crop protection it is combined with pheromones for mating disruption to provide an alternative for toxic pesticides for control of codling moth and other serious agricultural pests. 

Substance name:2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
Trade name:Butylated Hydroxy Toluene
EC no:204-881-4
CAS no:128-37-0
HS code:29153900
Formula:C15H24O

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), or chemically 2,6-ditert-butyl-p-cresol, is a fat soluble organic compound primarily used as an antioxidant food additive (E321).
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used as an antioxidant in cosmetics, pharmaceutical drugs, jet fuels, rubber and petroleum products. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) slows down the rate of autoxidation in foods and prevents changes in the foods colour, odour and taste by reacting with free radicals. 

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) can be added to the food itself or to the packing materials. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) prevents oxidative rancidity of fats. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also added directly to shortening, cereals and other foods containing fats and oils. 

However, the same chemical properties making BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) excellent preservatives may also implicate in health effects. 
The oxidative characteristics and/or metabolites of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may contribute to carcinogenicity or tumorigenecity. 
Certain persons may have difficulty in metabolizing BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) resulting in health and behaviour changes. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may also have antiviral and antimicrobial activities. 

Oxygen reacts preferentially with BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) rather than oxidizing fats and oils, thereby protecting them from spoilage.
Radiostability of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is important from its effectiveness point of view in the case of sterilization by radiation of materials such as foods, pharmaceutical drugs, cosmetics etc. containing it as preservative. 
Thus, the aim of the present work is to study the radiation stability of solid BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) through a detailed ESR study carried out on the kinetic, spectroscopic and dosimetric features of the radiolytic intermediates produced in it after gamma irradiation.

CAS Number: 128-37-0 
CHEBI: 34247  
ChEMBL: ChEMBL146 
ChemSpider: 13835296 
ECHA InfoCard: 100.004.439 
EC Number: 204-881-4
E number: E321 (antioxidants, ...)
KEGG: D02413  
PubChem CID: 31404
RTECS number: GO7875000
UNII: 1P9D0Z171K  
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID2020216

Synonym: BHT
Related categories: Specialty Chemicals, Biopharma & In-Vitro Diagnostics, Pharmaceutical Ingredients
TSCA : Yes
Boiling point : 265 °C
Melting point : 70 °C
Solubility : Practically insoluble in water, glycerin, propyleneglycol, solutions of alkali hydroxides, and dilute aqueousmineral acids. Freely soluble in acetone, benzene, ethanol(95%), ether, methanol, toluene, fixed oils, and mineral oil.
Molecular Weight : 220.35 g/mol
Density : Density (bulk):0.48–0.60 g/cm3 | Density (true):1.031 g/cm3

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is used as an antioxidant/preservative in foods at levels ranging from 10 to 200 ppm. 
Current food regulations establish a maximum content of 0.02 percent for all antioxidants combined. 
Industrial applications of BHT include use as an antioxidant in rubber, petroleum, and plastic products.
Butylated hydroxytoluene passed the animal data screen, underwent a preliminary toxicological evaluation, and is being brought to the Carcinogen Identification Committee for consultation. 
This is a compilation of the relevant studies identified during the preliminary toxicological evaluation. 

Chemical formula: C15H24O
Molar mass: 220.356 g/mol
Appearance    : White to yellow powder
Odor: Slight, phenolic
Density: 1.048 g/cm3
Melting point: 70 °C (158 °F; 343 K) 
Boiling point: 265 °C (509 °F; 538 K) 
Solubility in water: 1.1 mg/L (20 °C) 
log P: 5.32 
Vapor pressure: 0.01 mmHg (20 °C)

Preferred IUPAC name
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene), also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene, is a lipophilic organic compound, chemically a derivative of phenol, that is useful for itsantioxidant properties. 
European and U.S. regulations allow small amounts to be used as a food additive. 
In addition to this use, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is widely used to prevent oxidation in fluids (e.g. fuel, oil) and other materials where free radicals must be controlled.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used as an antioxidant additive in such diverse products as cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, rubber, electrical transformer oil In the petroleum industry, where BHT is known as the fuel additive AO-29, it also finds uses in hydraulic fluids, turbine and gear oils, and jet fuels, among other applications. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used to prevent peroxide formation in diethyl ether and other laboratory chemicals.
Some additive products contain BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as their primary ingredient, while others contain the chemical merely as a component of their formulation, sometimes alongside butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA).

Other names of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
DBPC
BHT
E321
AO-29
Avox BHT
Additin RC 7110
Dibutylated hydroxytoluene
4-Methyl-2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol
3,5-(Dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxytoluene

Hindered phenols find a wide variety of applications across many different industry sectors. 
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a most commonly used antioxidant recognized as safe for use in foods containing fats, pharmaceuticals, petroleum products, rubber and oil industries. In the past two decades, there has been growing interest in finding novel antioxidants to meet the requirements of these industries. 
To accelerate the antioxidant discovery process, researchers have designed and synthesized a series of BHT derivatives targeting to improve its antioxidant properties to be having a wide range of antioxidant activities markedly enhanced radical scavenging ability and other physical properties. 
Accordingly, some structure–activity relationships and rational design strategies for antioxidants based on BHT structure have been suggested and applied in practice. 

We have identified 14 very sensitive parameters, which may play a major role on the antioxidant performance of BHT. 
In this review, we attempt to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, which is of significance in selecting and designing novel antioxidants using a well-known antioxidant BHT as a building-block molecule. 
Our strategy involved investigation on understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of BHT, whether through hydrogen or electron transfer mechanism to enable promising anti-oxidant candidates to be synthesized.

BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) is a lab-made chemical that is added to foods as a preservative. 
People also use it as medicine.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used to treat genital herpes and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Some people apply BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) directly to the skin for cold sores.

How does BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) work ?
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is an antioxidant. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may damage the protective outer layer of viral cells. 
This may keep the viruses from multiplying and/or doing more damage.

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is one of the most commonly used synthetic antioxidants in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and petrochemical products. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is considered safe for human health; however, its widespread use together with the potential toxicological effects have increased consumers concern about the use of this synthetic food additive. 
In addition, the estimated daily intake of BHT has been demonstrated to exceed the recommended acceptable threshold. 
In the present work, using BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) as a case study, the usefulness of computational techniques, such as reverse screening and molecular docking, in identifying protein–ligand interactions of food additives at the bases of their toxicological effects has been probed. 

The computational methods here employed have been useful for the identification of several potential unknown targets of BHT, suggesting a possible explanation for its toxic effects.
In silico analyses can be employed to identify new macromolecular targets of synthetic food additives and to explore their functional mechanisms or side effects. 
Noteworthy, this could be important for the cases in which there is an evident lack of experimental studies, as is the case for BHT.

Health effects of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Like many closely related phenol antioxidants, BHT has low acute toxicity (e.g., the desmethyl analog of BHT, 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol, has an LD50 of >9 g/kg[11]). 
The US Food and Drug Administration classifies BHT as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a food preservative when used according in an approved manner.
In 1979, the National Cancer Institute determined that BHT was noncarcinogenic in a mouse model.

Nevertheless, the World Health Organization discussed a possible link between BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) and cancer risk in 1986, and some primary research studies in the 1970s–1990s reported both potential for increased risk and potential for decreased risk in the area of oncology.
Because of this uncertainty, the Center for Science in the Public Interest puts BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) in its "caution" column and recommends avoiding it.

Based on various, disparate primary research reports, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been suggested to have anti-viral activity, and the reports divide into various study types. 
First, there are studies that describe virus inactivation—where treatment with the chemical results in disrupted or otherwise inactivated virus particles.
The action of BHT in these is akin to the action of many other organic compounds, e.g., quaternary ammonium compounds, phenolics, and detergents, which disrupt viruses by insertion of the chemical into the virus membrane, coat, or other structure, which are established methods of viral disinfection secondary to methods of chemical oxidation and UV irradiation.

In addition, there is a report of BHT use, topically against genital herpes lesions, a report of inhibitory activity in vitro against pseudorabies (in cell culture), and two studies, in veterinary contexts, of use of BHT to attempt to protect against virus exposure (pseudorabies in mouse and swine, and Newcastle in chickens).
The relevance of other reports, regarding influenza in mice, is not easily discerned.
Notably, this series of primary research reports does not support a general conclusion of independent confirmation of the original research results, nor are there critical reviews appearing thereafter, in secondary sources, for the various host-virus systems studied with BHT.

Hence, at present, the results do not present a scientific consensus in favour of the conclusion of the general antiviral potential of BHT when dosed in humans. 
Moreover, as of March 2020, no guidance from any of the internationally recognized associations of infectious disease specialists had advocated use of BHT products as an antiviral therapy or prophylactic.

Natural occurrence of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Phytoplankton, including the green algae Botryococcus braunii, as well as three different cyanobacteria (Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Microcystis aeruginosa and Oscillatoria sp.) are capable of producing BHT as a natural product.
The fruit lychee also produces BHT in its pericarp.
Several fungi (for example Aspergillus conicus) living in olives produce BHT.

Industrial production of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
The chemical synthesis of BHT in industry has involved the reaction of p-cresol (4-methylphenol) with isobutylene (2-methylpropene), catalyzed by sulfuric acid: 
CH3(C6H4)OH + 2 CH2=C(CH3)2 → ((CH3)3C)2CH3C6H2OH
Alternatively, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been prepared from 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol by hydroxymethylation or aminomethylation followed by hydrogenolysis.

Description of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a man-made chemical commonly used as a preservative in processed foods. 
Similar to the synthetic preservative butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) with which it is often used, BHT is an antioxidant that is soluble in oils and animal fats (it actually has greater solubility than does BHA). 
Both BHA and BHT are used to extend shelf life of processed foods by reducing the occurrence of oxidation and rancidity. 
Instead of being added directly to the food itself, BHT is usually added to the packaging material from where it vaporizes into the food during storage. 

Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may be classified as an incidental food additive when used in this manner, it does not legally need to be listed with other ingredients on the food label.
Processed foods most likely to contain BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) include chewing gum, active dry yeast, frozen convenience foods, prepared cereal products, prepared snacks, dried and processed meat, potato flakes, enriched rice products and shortening. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also a chemical preservative used in animal feeds and drugs; therefore eatomg non-organic meats and dairy products may be another way in which exposure occurs. 
In addition to BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)s use in food preservation, BHA is also used in the manufacture of rubber, tires and petroleum and is an ingredient in some cosmetics.

While BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is on the Federal Drug Administrations Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list of food additives, it carries with it risk of toxicity. 
Although not been enough research has been conducted involving humans to establish whether or not BHT is a carcinogen (chemical capable of causing cancer), limited evidence in animals suggests that BHT is carcinogenic. 
Some of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)'s potential carcinogenicity may come from its ability to cause toxic disruption of cell signaling, a process where chemical information is transferred from one cell to another or between different structures within the same cell. 
Proper cellular communication is not only important for optimal functioning of the bodys systems, but researchers now believe that poor communication between cells may be one of the causes of overgrowth of cells, a condition which eventually leads to cancer.

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been found to have other some adverse effects in animals including inhibiting normal growth patterns and causing reversible liver enlargement. 
At high levels in animals, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has caused significant brain and behavioral changes. 
Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been found to inhibit the enzymes that white blood cells (phagocytes) use to destroy bacteria, BHT disrupts the proper functioning of the immune system. 
Additionally, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) seems to be capable of uncoupling a critical cellular energy-producing process known as phosphorylation with the result being a diminished supply of cellular energy available to power the cells, and therefore, the body.

Antioxidant used in foods, cosmetics, petroleum products, etc. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may inhibit some neoplasms and facilitate others.

Sources of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Instead of being added directly to the food itself, BHT is usually added to the packaging material from where it can vaporize into the food during storage. 
Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) may be classified as an incidental food additive when used in this manner, it does not legally need to be listed with other ingredients on the food label. 
Processed foods most likely to feature BHT include chewing gum, active dry yeast, frozen convenience foods, prepared cereal products, prepared snacks, dried and processed meat, potato flakes, enriched rice products and shortening. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also a chemical preservative used in animal feeds and drugs; therefore consumption of non-organic meats and dairy products may be another vector for exposure. 
In addition to its use in food preservation, BHA is also used in the manufacture of rubber, tires and petroleum and is an ingredient in some cosmetics.

Physical Effects of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
While BHT is on the Federal Drug Administrations Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list of food additives, it carries with it risk of toxicity. 
Although there has not been enough research conducted involving humans to establish whether or not BHT is a carcinogen (chemical capable of causing cancer) there is limited evidence in animals that BHT is carcinogenic. 
Some of its potential carcinogenicity may come from its ability to cause toxic disruption of cell signaling, a process where chemical information is transferred from one cell to the other or between different structures within the same cell. 

Proper cellular communication is not only important for optimal functioning of the bodys systems but researchers now believe that poor communication between cells may be one of the causes of overproliferation of cells, a condition which eventually leads to cancer.
BHT has been found to have other some adverse effects in animals including inhibiting normal growth patterns and causing reversible liver enlargement while at high levels, significant brain and behavioral changes have also been observed. 
Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been found to inhibit the enzymes that phagocytes (white blood cells) use to destroy bacteria, BHT disrupts the proper functioning of the immune system. 
Additionally, BHT seems to be capable of uncoupling a cellular energy-producing process known as phosphorylation with the result being a diminished supply of cellular energy available to power the cells, and therefore, the body.

Reactions of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
The species behaves as a synthetic analog of vitamin E, primarily acting as a terminating agent that suppresses autoxidation, a process whereby unsaturated (usually) organic compounds are attacked by atmospheric oxygen. 
BHT stops this autocatalytic reaction by converting peroxy radicals to hydroperoxides. 

BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) effects this function by donating a hydrogen atom:
RO2• + ArOH → ROOH + ArO•
RO2• + ArO• → nonradical products

where R is alkyl or aryl, and where ArOH is BHT or related phenolic antioxidants. 
Each BHT consumes two peroxy radicals.

Butylated hydroxytoluene, a cresol derivative, is an additive used as an antioxidant in foods, such as packet cake mixes, potato crisps, salted peanuts, and dehydrated mashed potatoes. 
In March 1990 the Danish Product Register included 440 products containing butylated hydroxytoluene; the content was below 50 ppm in 66% of these products; the main categories were paints/lacquers and hardeners for paints, glues, and fillers. 

Background on BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene)
BHT is a lipophilic organic compound. 
More specifically, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is a synthetic antioxidant widely used in multiple sectors, including food additives, cosmetics and personal care products, pharmaceuticals, plastics/rubbers and other petroleum products. 
Butylated hydroxytoluene is reducing the free-radical induced damage and spoilage; therefore, it helps maintain the properties and performance of products when exposed to air (i.e. preventing change in odour, colour, texture, etc.). 
BHT is reported to be used as an antioxidant at a range of concentrations (0.0002 - 0.8%) across a wide spectrum of cosmetic product types, dermally applied and sprayable products.
The ingredient BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene) (CAS No 128-37-0, EC No 204-881-4) with the chemical name ‘2,6-Di-Tert-Butyl-4-Methylphenol’ is not currently regulated under the Cosmetic Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009, however it is included in the European database for information on cosmetic substances and ingredients (CosIng) with the reported functions of ‘antioxidant’ and ‘fragrance’.
During the call for data, stakeholders submitted scientific evidence to demonstrate the safety of BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene) in cosmetic products. 
The Commission requests the SCCS to carry out a safety assessment on BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene) in view of the information provided. 

Why Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) is Restricted
-BHT is very toxic to aquatic life and is also a skin and eye irritant.
-BHT can be transferred from the plastic packaging to the fabric which can react with the nitrogen oxide in the air and in alkaline conditions can form nitrobenzenes. 
This reaction can cause phenolic yellowing. 
Although this can occur with all colors, it is most visible with white and pastel colors. 
Darker colors may appear duller in appearance.
-The solvent in the adhesive tape used to seal the packaging can leach the BHT out of the packaging film and onto the garment.

Formula: C15H24O
Formula mass: 220.36
Melting point, °C: 69 - 70
Boiling point, °C: 265
Vapor pressure, mmHg: 0.006 (25 C)
Vapor density (air=1): 7.6
Saturation Concentration: 13 ppm (0.001%) at 20 C (calculated)
Density: 1.069 g/cm3 (19.85 C)
Solubility in water: 0.6 mg/L
Viscosity: 3.47 centistokes at 0C
Refractive index: 1.4859 (75 C)
pKa/pKb: 12.75 (pKa)
Partition coefficient, pKow: 5.32
Heat of fusion: 19.87 kJ/mol
Heat of vaporization: 52.2 kJ/mol

A white, crystalline powder without any odor. 
Butylated Hydroxyl Toluene is a chemically derived organic compound. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) functions as a very effective antioxidant and preservative in many various applications such as food &amp|beverage, personal care, paints, coatings, inks, dyes adhesives, sealants, and in the animal feed and agriculture industries. As a representative of the largest and highest quality manufacturers in the world. 
TRI imports and stocks Butylated Hydroxyl Toluene in warehouses across the United States. 
By working directly with the manufacturer we are able to provide competitive sourcing solutions. 
Quality documents including, but not limited to Kosher Certificates, Non-GMO Statements, Allergen Statements, and SDS available upon request.
Empirical Formula: C15H24O

CAS: 128-37-0
EC (EINECS/ELINCS): 204-881-4
EC Class: dangerous for the environment
EC Risk Phrase: R 22 36/38
EC Safety Phrase: S 26 36/37/39
RTECS: GO7875000
RTECS class: Tumorigen; Mutagen; Reproductive Effector; Human Data; Primary Irritant
UN (DOT): 3077
Merck: 13,1547
Beilstein/Gmelin: 1911640
Beilstein Reference: 4-06-00-03511
EPA OPP: 22105
Swiss Giftliste 1: G-2202
Canada DSL/NDSL    DSL

Storage: Store in a cool, dry place. Do not store in direct sunlight. Keep container closed when not in use.
Handling: Wash thoroughly after handling. Wash hands before eating. Remove contaminated clothing and wash before reuse. Use with adequate ventilation. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid ingestion and inhalation.
Protection: Eyes: Wear appropriate protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles as described by OSHA's eye and face protection regulations in 29 CFR 1910.133 or European Standard EN166. Skin: Wear appropriate protective gloves to prevent skin exposure. Clothing: Wear appropriate protective clothing to prevent skin exposure.
Respirators: Follow the OSHA respirator regulations found in 29CFR 1910.134 or European Standard EN 149. Always use a NIOSH or European Standard EN 149 approved respirator when necessary.
Small spills/leaks: Vacuum or sweep up material and place into a suitable disposal container. Reduce airborne dust and prevent scattering by moistening with water. Clean up spills immediately, using the appropriate protective equipment. Avoid generating dusty conditions. Provide ventilation.
Disposal code: 3
Stability: Stable under normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities: Acid chlorides, acid anhydrides, oxidizing agents, bases, steel (corrodes it), brass, copper, copper alloys, and direct sunlight.
Decomposition: Carbon monoxide, irritating and toxic fumes and gases, carbon dioxide.

Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) is probably the most efficient anti-oxidant used in perfumery. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is almost odourless in use but as a pure white to off-white crystalline powder has a very faint musty cresylic phenolic odour. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used from 0.1% in citrus oils, alipihatic aldehydes, fixed oils and many other oxygen sensitive materials, compounds and finished products it can greatly extend their shelf and odour life and also slow down, but not completely stop, colour changes.

Exposure of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) has been used since 1947 as a common antioxidant in rubber and petroleum products and, more recently, in plastics. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been used since 1949 as an antioxidant in many fat-containing foods, in edible fats and oils and in cosmetics. 
There is thus widespread human exposure to this compound.

Description of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a synthetic phenolic compound mainly used as an antioxidant and preservative in the food industry. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used to prevent the lipid oxidation in oils and fat-containing foods.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) toxicity is generally considered as being low.
Since BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used in many near consumer products population wide exposure is expected.

Chemical Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene(BHT) is white or light yellow crystal. BHT has a melting point of 71°C, a boiling point of 265°C, a relative density of 1.048 (20/4°C), and a refractive index of 1.4859 (75°C). 
Solubility of BHT at normal temperature: methanol 25, ethanol 25-26, isopropanol 30, mineral oil 30, acetone 40, petroleum ether 50, benzene 40, lard (40-50°C ) 40-50, corn oil and soybean oil 40-50. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is insoluble in water, 10NaOH solution, glycerol, and propylene glycol. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is odorless, odorless with good thermal stability.

Application from Literature:
The applications of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) have been reported as following [1-9]:
• Butylated hydroxytoluene metabolites causing DNA strand breaks in cultured cells and DNA breaks between nucleosomes (a typical feature of apoptosis), which result in relieving inflammation.
• Inhibiting secretion, aggregation, and protein phosphorylation caused by protein kinase C activators at the process of the pre-incubation of aspirin-treated platelets.
• Inhibiting liver cancer formation induced by aflatoxin B1.
• As Michael receptor, butylated hydroxytoluene can react with uninucleophiles and proteins.
• Reaction of 2, 6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol with fluorine (II) - benzophenone dianion complex.
• Food additive 2, 6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol can promote acute lung toxicity and tumor growth in mice.
• Butylated hydroxytoluene can be used to prepare organoaluminum compound methylaluminum bis (2, 6-di-tert-butyl-4-alkylphenol oxide).

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene has wide application, such as flavors, fragrances, biochemical reagents-other chemical reagents, chemical raw materials, organic chemical raw materials, biochemical, inorganic salts, antioxidants, food additives, feed additives, feed storage additives, aromatic hydrocarbons, bulk drugs and so on. 
As a phenolic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene can inhibit lipid peroxidation and exhibit electrophilic quinone methyl ether toxicity mediated by oxidative metabolism. 
The BHT metabolites, 6-tert-butyl-2- [2 ′-(2′-hydroxymethyl) -propyl] -4-methylphenol, may cause lung damage in mice and promote tumor growth.

Mammalian physiology:
BHT is a phenolic antioxidant. 
BHT can inhibit lipid peroxidation and cause lung injury in mice and promote tumor growth, which may be due to the metabolites of BHT, 6-tert-butyl-2-[2′-(2′-hydroxymethyl)-propyl]-4-Methylphenol. 
BHT metabolites have also been reported to cause DNA strand breaks in cultured cells and DNA breaks between nucleosomes (a typical feature of apoptosis). 
A single intraperitoneal injection of BHT (60mg/kg body weight) into rats caused a significant increase in nuclear DNA methyltransferase activity in the liver, kidney, heart, spleen, brain, and lung.

Description of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is a synthetic antioxidant. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) scavenges peroxide, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide, and ABTS radicals in cell-free assays, as well as inhibits lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid in vitro when used at a concentration of 45 μg/ml. 
BHT (0.025-3.2 mM) reduces freeze-thaw-induced malondialdehyde (MDA) production and increases sperm viability in boar spermatozoa preparations. 
Formulations containing BHT have been used as antioxidant cosmetic and food additives.

Description of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene is contained in food, adhesive glues, industrial oils and greases, including cutting fluids. 
Sensitization seems very rare.

Chemical Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHA and BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) are monohydric phenolic antioxidants that, prior to their introduction and acceptance in the food industry, were used to protect petroleum against oxidative degumming. 
BHT has a very faint, musty, occasional cresylictype odor. 
BHA and BHT are extensively used in foods as antioxidants. 
Most fats, oils and fat-containing foods are naturally susceptible to rapid rancification and other oxidative reactions that produce compounds having objectionable taste and odor, making foods containing them unpalatable. 
Lipid oxidation is autocatalytic and proceeds as a complex of chain reactions, the nature and speed of which vary with the substrate, temperature, light, availability of oxygen and presence or absence of oxidation catalysts. 
Antioxidants like BHT act as “chain breaks” in the autooxidation processes under the usual conditions of processing, storage and use of fat-containing foods.

Chemical Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
white crystalline solid

Chemical Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is a white to pale yellow crystalline solid or powder.

Chemical Properties of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene occurs as a white or pale yellow crystalline solid or powder with a faint characteristic phenolic odor.

Occurrence of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Not reported found naturally.

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is also known as butylated hydroxy toluene. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is an anti-oxidant that also has preservative and masking capabilities.

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) is an antioxidant that functions similarly to butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) but is less stable at high temperatures. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also termed 2,6-di-tert-butyl-para-cresol. See Butylated Hydroxyanisole.

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Antioxidant 264 as general antioxidants is used widely in polymer materials, petroleum products and food processing industries. 
Antioxidant 264 is commonly used rubber antioxidant, heat, oxygen aging have some protective effect, but also can inhibit copper harm. 
This product does not change color, not pollution. 
Antioxidants 264 high solubility in oil, no precipitation, less volatile, non-toxic and non-corrosive.

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Antioxidant for food, animal feed, petroleum products, synthetic rubbers, plastics, animal and vegetable oils, soaps. 
Antiskinning agent in paints and inks.

Uses of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Because they prevent rancidity, antioxidants are of great interest to the food industry. 
For example, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), and EDTA are frequently used to preserve various foods, such as cheese or fried products. 
Butylated hydroxytoluene is a powerful inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, yet large doses of it can induce oxidative DNA damage and cancer development in the rat forestomach.

Definition of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
ChEBI: A member of the class of phenols that is 4-methylphenol substituted by tert-butyl groups at positions 2 and 6.

Preparation of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is produced commercially by the alkylation of para-cresol with isobutylene. 
BHT is also produced by several western European manufacturers, production/processing plants in Germany, France, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Spain.

Production Methods of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Prepared by the reaction of p-cresol with isobutene.

General Description of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
White crystalline solid.

Air & Water Reactions of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is insoluble in water. 

Reactivity Profile of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Phenols, such as 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, do not behave as organic alcohols, as one might guess from the presence of a hydroxyl (-OH) group in their structure. 
Instead, they react as weak organic acids. Phenols and cresols are much weaker as acids than common carboxylic acids (phenol has Ka = 1.3 x 10^[-10]). 
These materials are incompatible with strong reducing substances such as hydrides, nitrides, alkali metals, and sulfides. 
Flammable gas (H2) is often generated, and the heat of the reaction may ignite the gas. 
Heat is also generated by the acid-base reaction between phenols and bases. 
Such heating may initiate polymerization of the organic compound. 
Phenols are sulfonated very readily (for example, by concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature). 
The reactions generate heat. 
Phenols are also nitrated very rapidly, even by dilute nitric acid. 
Nitrated phenols often explode when heated. 
Many of them form metal salts that tend toward detonation by rather mild shock. 
May react with oxidizing materials.

Where is butylhydroxytoluene (bht) found?
Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) is an antioxidant food additive and is also found in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, jet fuels, rubber, petroleum products, and embalming fluid.

How can you avoid contact with butylhydroxytoluene (bht)?
Avoid products that list any of the following names in the ingredients:
• Ionol CP-antioxidant
• 1-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2,6-di-tertbutylbenzene
• 2,6-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4- methylphenol
• 2,6-Di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol
• 2,6-Di-t-butyl-p-cresol
• 2,6-Di-terc.butyl-p-kresol
• 2,6-Di-terc.butyl-p-kresol [Czech]
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-1-hydroxy-4- methylbenzene
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-cresol
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4- methylhydroxybenzene
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
• 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
• 3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
• 4-Hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butyltoluene
• 4-Methyl-2,6-di-terc. Butylfenol
• 4-Methyl-2,6-di-terc. butylfenol [Czech]
• 4-Methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol
• 4-Methyl-2,6-tert-butylphenol
• AI3-19683
• AO 29
• AO 4
• AO 4K
• AOX 4
• AOX 4K
• Advastab 401
• Agidol
• Agidol 1
• Alkofen BP
• Antioxidant 264
• Antioxidant 29
• Antioxidant 30
• Antioxidant 4
• Antioxidant 4K
• Antioxidant DBPC
• Antioxidant KB
• Antioxidant MPJ
• Antioxidant T 501
• Antox QT
• Antrancine 8
• BAT
• BHT
• BHT (food grade)
• BHT 264
• BUKS
• Butylated hydroxytoluene
• Butylated hydroxytoluol
• Butylhydroxytoluene
• Butylohydroksytoluenu
• Butylohydroksytoluenu [Polish]
• CAO 1
• CAO 3
• CCRIS 103
• Caswell No. 291A
• Catalin antioxydant 1
• Catalin cao-3
• Chemanox 11
• DBPC
• DBPC (technical grade)
• Dalpac
• Deenax
• Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
• Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (VAN)
• Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
• Dibunol
• Dibutylated hydroxytoluene
• EINECS 204-881-4
• EPA Pesticide Chemical Code
• 022105
• FEMA No. 2184
• HSDB 1147
• Impruvol
• Ionol
• Ionol (antioxidant)
• Ionol 1
• Ionol CP
• Ionole
• Kerabit
• NCI-C03598
• NSC 6347
• Nocrac 200
• Nonox TBC
• P 21
• P21
• Parabar 441
• Paranox 441
• Phenol, 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4- methyl-
• Stavox
• Sumilizer BHT
• Sustane
• Sustane BHT
• Swanox BHT
• Tenamen 3
• Tenamene 3
• Tenox BHT
• Tonarol
• Topanol
• Topanol O
• Topanol OC
• Toxolan P
• Vanlube PC
• Vanlube PCX
• Vianol
• Vulkanox KB
• o-Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol

What are some products that may contain butylhydroxytoluene (bht)?
-Bar Soaps
-Body Washes
-Cosmetics
-Deodorants
-Hair Care
-Household Products
-Liquids/Creams/Lotions
-Powders
-Shaving Products
-Sunscreen
-Toothpaste

Health Hazard of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol or BHT is of relatively low acute toxicity in animals, and there is no evidence of either acute or chronic effects among exposed workers.

Fire Hazard of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol is combustible.

Pharmaceutical Applications of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is used as an antioxidant in cosmetics, foods, and pharmaceuticals. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is mainly used to delay or prevent the oxidative rancidity of fats and oils and to prevent loss of activity of oil-soluble vitamins.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used at 0.5–1.0% w/w concentration in natural or synthetic rubber to provide enhanced color stability.
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has some antiviral activity and has been used therapeutically to treat herpes simplex labialis.

Biochem/physiol Actions of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a phenolic antioxidant. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) causes lung injury and promotes tumors in mice, but this may be due to a metabolite of BHT, 6-tert-butyl-2-[2′-(2′-hydroxymethyl)-propyl]-4-methylphenol. 
Metabolites of BHT have also been reported to induce DNA strand breaks and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (a characteristic of apoptosis) in cultured cells. 

In rats, a single intraperitoneal injection of BHT (60 mg/kg body mass) results in a significant increase in nuclear DNA methyl transferase activity in the liver, kidneys, heart, spleen, brain and lungs. 
Incubation of alveolar macrophages with BHT significantly reduced the level of TNF-α which may explain the mechanism by which this antioxidant reduces inflammation. 
Preincubation of aspirin-treated platelets with BHT inhibits the secretion, aggregation, and protein phosphorylation induced by protein kinase C activators. 
BHT was also found to inhibit the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis by aflatoxin B1.

Contact allergens of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
This antioxidant is contained in food, adhesive glues, industrial oils, and greases, including cutting fluids. 
Sensitization seems very rare.

Carcinogenicity of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
The IARC has determined that there is limited evidence for the carcinogenicity of BHT in experimental animals.
BHT has given primarily negative results in a large number of in vivo and in vitro genotoxic assays.
No significant reproductive effects were observed in three-generation toxicity studies in mice administered up to 0.4% in the diet.
The 2003 ACGIH threshold limit valuetime- weighted average (TLV-TWA) for 2,6-ditert- butyl-p-cresol is 2mg/m3.

Environmental Fate of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
The metabolites of BHT can bind to cellular macromolecules, such as proteins and DNA, and cause toxicity.

Potential Exposure of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
DBPC is used as a food and feed additive, flavor, and packaging material; as an antioxidant in human foods and animal feeds. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is also used as an antioxidant to sta- bilize petroleum fuels, rubber and vinyl plastics.

Safety Profile of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Poison by intraperitoneal andintravenous routes. 
Moderately toxic by ingestion. 
Anexperimental teratogen. 
Other experimental reproductiveeffects. 
A human skin irritant. 
A skin and eye irritant.
Questionable carcinogen with experimental carcinogenicand.

Safety of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene is readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is metabolized and excreted in the urine mainly as glucuronide conjugates of oxidation products. 
Although there have been some isolated reports of adverse skin reactions, butylated hydroxytoluene is generally regarded as nonirritant and nonsensitizing at the levels employed as an antioxidant.
The WHO has set a temporary estimated acceptable daily intake for butylated hydroxytoluene at up to 125 μg/kg body-weight.
Ingestion of 4 g of butylated hydroxytoluene, although causing severe nausea and vomiting, has been reported to be nonfatal.
LD50 (guinea pig, oral): 10.7 g/kg
LD50 (mouse, IP): 0.14 g/kg
LD50 (mouse, IV): 0.18 g/kg
LD50 (mouse, oral): 0.65 g/kg
LD50 (rat, oral): 0.89 g/kg

Storage of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Exposure to light, moisture, and heat causes discoloration and a loss of activity. 
Butylated hydroxytoluene should be stored in a wellclosed container, protected from light, in a cool, dry place.

Shipping of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
UN2811 Toxic solids, organic, n.o.s., Hazard Class: 6.1; Labels: 6.1-Poisonous materials, Technical Name Required.

Purification Methods of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Dissolve BHT in n-hexane at room temperature, then cool with rapid stirring, to -60o. 
The precipitate is separated, redissolved in hexane, and the process is repeated until the mother liquor is no longer coloured. 
The final product is stored under N2 at 0o. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) has also been recrystallised from EtOH, MeOH, *benzene, n-hexane, methylcyclohexane or pet ether (b 60-80o), and is dried in a vacuum. 

Toxicity evaluation of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
BHT is a white crystalline solid. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is insoluble in water and alkalies; but soluble in most common organic solvents such as alcohol and ether. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene)s melting point is 70°C, boiling point is 265°C, flash point is 127°C, and specific gravity is 1.048 at 20°C.

Incompatibilities of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Butylated hydroxytoluene is phenolic and undergoes reactions characteristic of phenols. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents such as peroxides and permanganates. 
Contact with oxidizing agents may cause spontaneous combustion. 
Iron salts cause discoloration with loss of activity. 
Heating with catalytic amounts of acids causes rapid decomposition with the release of the flammable gas isobutene.

Incompatibilities of BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene):
Contact with oxidizers may cause fire and explosion hazard.

Experimental data:
Butylated hydroxytoluene was tested for carcinogenicity in mice and rats by oral administration in the diet. 
In one study in mice, there was no difference in tumour incidence among treated and control groups. 
Another study in mice showed an increased incidence of pulmonary tumors in females at the lower but not at the higher dose level. 
In another study in mice using one dose level and a small number of animals, the number of mice with lung tumours was increased by feeding of butylated hydroxytoluene; this finding was not confirmed in a further study by the same investigator using a larger number of animals. 

In one study in rats, no increase in tumour incidence was seen. 
An increased incidence of pituitary adenomas was observed in female rats at the lower but not at the higher dose level in another study. 
In one further experiment in rats, liver tumours were observed; however, this study could not be evaluated because of differential survival among control and treated groups.
Butylated hydroxytoluene was studied in mice and rats for its ability to modify the carcinogenicity of selected chemical agents. 
When administered with known carcinogens, butylated hydroxytoluene either enhanced, inhibited or had no effect on carcinogenicity.

No adequate data were available to evaluate the reproductive effects or prenatal toxicity of butylated hydroxytoluene to experimental animals.
In mice, a single intraperitoneal dose or feeding of butylated hydroxytoluene can cause pulmonary alveolar cell necrosis and proliferation. 
Butylated hydroxytoluene also induces proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in rat-liver cells, leading to hepatomegaly.

Butylated hydroxytoluene did not induce DNA damage in Bacillus subtilis or mutation in Salmonella typhimurium. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) did not induce chromosomal aberrations in plants or mutation or chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster. 
In one study, BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) was reported to be mutagenic to cultured Chinese hamster cells in the presence of an exogenous metabolic system. 
Binding of butylated hydroxytoluene to the DNA of liver of rats treated in vivo has been reported. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) did not induce micronuclei in bone marrow or dominant lethal mutations in mice. 
BHT (Butyl hydroxy toluene) induced sperm abnormalities in mice.

When tested in combination with other chemicals (usually, known mutagens or carcinogens), butylated hydroxytoluene often modified the DNA-damaging, mutagenic and clastogenic activities. 
In most studies, butylated hydroxytoluene reduced the activity of indirectly-acting mutagens or carcinogens.

Human data:
No data were available to evaluate the carcinogenicity of butlyated hydroxytoluene to humans.

Evaluation:
There is limited evidence for the carcinogenicity of butylated hydroxytoluene in experimental animals.
No evaluation could be made of the carcinogenicity of butylated hydroxytoluene to humans.

Toxic doses of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a phenolic antioxidant commonly used as a food additive, are known to produce lung damage. 
In this study, 3 days after a single ip injection of 62.5, 215, or 500 mg/kg BHT in mice there was a dose‐dependent increase in lung weight. 
This concentration dependence with injected BHT was accompanied by increases in lung DNA and nonprotein sulfhydryl levels and in whole lung tissue enzyme activities of glutathione (GSH) peroxidase, GSH reductase, glucose‐6‐phosphate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. 
The increased enzyme activities are considered to correspond to inflammatory and proliferative pulmonary changes resulting from acute lung cell injury and necrosis, which have been described previously, and cannot be construed as evidence for a primary oxidant‐induced pulmonary lesion. 
The mechanism of BHT‐induced lung changes may not be related to the antioxidant property of BHT, since vitamin E, n‐propyl gallate, ethoxyquin, N,N‘‐diphenyl‐p‐phenylenediamine, and the structurally similar compound, butylated hydroxyanisole did not appear to produce the gross anatomical or biochemical lung changes observed with BHT.

BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) and BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) are closely related synthetic antioxidants used as preservatives in lipsticks and moisturizers, among other cosmetics. 
They are also widely used as food preservatives.

Other Chemical Names: 
2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol, butylated hydroxytoluene
2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (DBPC)
3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
1,3- di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxy-5-methyl benzene
E321,dibutylhydroxytoluene, 4-methyl-2,6- ditertbutylphenol, di-tert-butyl-methylphenol

Decay of the 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenoxy radical [butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-radical] in the presence of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) was investigated in 1,2-dimethoxyethane with or without triethylamine. 
BHT-radical was conveniently generated by dissociation of its unstable dimer in solution. 
The products were BHT, 3,3′-di-tert-butyl-5,5′-dimethoxy-2,2′-dihydroxybiphenyl (BHA-dimer), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-quinone methide (QM), 1,2-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane, and 3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl-4,4′-stilbenequinone. 
The reaction without added triethylamine gave larger quantities of the last two products and BHA (recovery), whereas the reaction with it provided larger quantities of the first two products. 

The marked difference in the product distribution can be accounted for by a series of reactions including reversible dehydrogenation of BHA with BHT-radical, which generates 2-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenoxy radical (BHA-radical) and BHT, reversible dimerization of BHA-radical, which affords an intermediarybis(cyclohexadienone), and spontaneous and base-catalyzed prototropic rearrangement of the intermediate into BHA-dimer. 
Products of coupling between BHT-radical and BHA-radical were not obtained. 
BHA was found to undergo facile acid-catalyzed addition to QM, providing two isomericbis(hydroxyphenyl)methanes. 
The results help to elucidate the mechanism of antioxidant synergism between BHA and BHT and may suggest that the synergism can be affected by base or acid.

2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
128-37-0
Butylated hydroxytoluene
Butylhydroxytoluene
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
2,6-Di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol
Ionol
BHT
DBPC
Dibunol
Stavox
Ionol CP
Phenol, 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl-
Impruvol
Topanol
Dalpac
Deenax
Ionole
Vianol
Antioxidant KB
3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
2,6-ditert-butyl-4-methylphenol
Antioxidant 4K
Sumilizer BHT
Topanol O
Topanol OC
Vanlube PC
Antioxidant DBPC
Sustane BHT
Tenamene 3
Vanlube PCX
Antioxidant 29
Antioxidant 30
Nonox TBC
Tenox BHT
Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
Chemanox 11
Ionol 1
Agidol
Catalin CAO-3
Kerabit
Advastab 401
Ionol (antioxidant)
BUKS
Parabar 441
Paranox 441
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-cresol
Catalin antioxydant 1
Antrancine 8
Butylated hydroxytoluol
Vulkanox KB
Dibutylated hydroxytoluene
Ional
2,6-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol
AO 4K
CAO 1
CAO 3
Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
o-Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
4-Methyl-2,6-tert-butylphenol
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-1-hydroxy-4-methylbenzene
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
AO 29
NCI-C03598
2,6-DI-T-BUTYL-P-CRESOL
4-Methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol
Butyl hydroxy toluene
2,6-Di-terc.butyl-p-kresol
4-Hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butyltoluene
FEMA No. 2184
P 21
Bht(food grade)
4-Methyl-2,6-di-terc. butylfenol
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methyl-phenol
Butylhydroxytoluenum
1-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylbenzene
MFCD00011644
Di-tert-butylcresol
UNII-1P9D0Z171K
Butylated hydroxytoluene (bht)
Dbpc(technical grade)
E321
p-Cresol, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-
2,6-ditert-butyl-4-methyl-phenol
CHEMBL146
CHEBI:34247
1P9D0Z171K
NSC-6347
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol
NCGC00091761-03
Tonarol
DSSTox_CID_216
Antioxidant MPJ
Antioxidant 4
Toxolan P
Alkofen BP
Swanox BHT
Tenamen 3
Antox QT
Antioxidant 264
DSSTox_RID_75440
Agidol 1
DSSTox_GSID_20216
Bht (food grade)
Antioxidant T 501
Nocrac 200
Caswell No. 291A
Dbpc (technical grade)
Annulex BHT
AOX 4K
AOX 4
CAS-128-37-0
Butylohydroksytoluenu
CCRIS 103
Butylohydroksytoluenu [Polish]
Ionol CP-antioxidant
Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (VAN)
HSDB 1147
BHT 264
NSC 6347
EINECS 204-881-4
2,6-Di-terc.butyl-p-kresol [Czech]
EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 022105
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylhydroxybenzene
Popol
AI3-19683
4-Methyl-2,6-di-terc. butylfenol [Czech]
Lowinox BHT
Nipanox BHT
BHT Swanox
BHT, food grade
4-Methyl-2,6-di-t-butyl-phenol
Ionol BHT
Ralox BHT
2, food grade
Butylated hydroxytoluene [BAN:NF]
Dibutyl-para-cresol
2,6-bis(tert-butyl)-4-methylphenol
butylated-hydroxytoluene
Spectrum_001790
BHT FCC/NF
SpecPlus_000768
Methyldi-tert-butylphenol
Spectrum3_001849
Spectrum5_001612
Hydagen DEO (Salt/Mix)
EC 204-881-4
2,6-di-Butyl-para-cresol
2.6-di-t-butyl-p-cresol
SCHEMBL3950
2,6-ditert-butyl-p-cresol
p-Cresol,6-di-tert-butyl-
Di-tert-Butylparamethylphenol
BSPBio_003238
KBioSS_002281
2,6-di-tert.butyl-p-cresol
Di-tert-Butyl-4-methylphenol
MLS000069425
BIDD:ER0031
Butylated hydroxytoluene (NF)
DivK1c_006864
SPECTRUM1600716
2,6-bis-tert-butyl-p-cresol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-paracresol
BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene)
2,6-di-tert. butyl-p-cresol
2,6-di-tert.-butyl-p-cresol
2,6-ditertiary-butyl-p-cresol
INS NO.321
2,6-di-tert-butyl-para-cresol
2,6-di-tert-Butyl-methylphenol
2,6-ditertbutyl-4-methylphenol
DTXSID2020216
2,6-di-t butyl-4-methylphenol
2.6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol
FEMA 2184
KBio1_001808
KBio2_002280
KBio2_004848
KBio2_007416
KBio3_002738
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4methylphenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl4-methylphenol
2,6-di-tertbutyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-ditert.butyl-4-methylphenol
Butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT)
INS-321
NSC6347
2,6-Di(tert-butyl)hydroxytoluene
2,6-di(t-butyl)-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-t- butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-t-butyl 4-methyl phenol
2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methyl phenol
2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methyl-phenol
3,5-di-t-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
Butylated hydroxytoluene (e 321)
HMS2091E21
HMS2231M22
HMS3369G17
HMS3750M21
Pharmakon1600-01600716
2,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl 4-methylpheno
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4 methylphenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl4-methyl phenol
2,6-di-tert.butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-ditert.-butyl-4-methylphenol
2.6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
4-methyl-2,6-di-tert.butylphenol
2,6-di-ter-butyl-4-methyl-phenol
2,6-Di-tert.-Butyl4-methylphenol
2,6-ditertiarybutyl-4-methylphenol
2.6-di- t-butyl- 4-methylphenol
AMY40200
HY-Y0172
STR04334
ZINC1481993
2,6 -di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-di(tert-butyl)-4-methylphenol
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol, 8CI
2,6-di-tert.-butyl-4-methylphenol
Tox21_113537
Tox21_201093
Tox21_303408
2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (BHT)
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-para-methylphenol
BDBM50079507
NSC759563
s6202
STL277184
2,6-di-tert. butyl-4-methyl phenol
2,6-Di-(tert-butyl)-4-methylphenol
AKOS000269037
Tox21_113537_1
CCG-207937
CM14391
CS-W020053
MCULE-4627478482
NSC-759563
Phenol, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methyl-
NCGC00091761-01
NCGC00091761-02
NCGC00091761-04
NCGC00091761-05
NCGC00091761-06
NCGC00091761-07
NCGC00257275-01
NCGC00258645-01
AC-10553
L133
SMR000059076
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT)
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, 99%
SBI-0052890.P002
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, >=99%
Butylated hydroxytoluene, >=99%, FCC, FG
D0228
E-321
FT-0610731
Phenol,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl-
2,6-bis-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol
4-Methyl-2,6- di(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenol
PK04_181024
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-1-hydroxy-4-methyl benzene
D02413
D77866
MLS-0146297.0001
AB00053233_09
Phenol, 3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl-
2,6-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol, 9CI
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, puriss., 99%
A937188
AC-907/25014329
Q221945
SR-01000735918
SR-01000735918-2
W-108376
9FC4DFC8-480D-487C-A74A-2EC9EECE92C4
BENZENE,1,3-DITERT.BUTYL,2-HYDROXY,5-METHYL
BRD-K53153417-001-01-3
BRD-K53153417-001-06-2
2,6-D[(CH3)3C]2C6H2(CH3)OHi-tert-butyl-p-cresol
F0001-0395
Z955123624
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, purum, >=99.0% (GC)
WLN: 1X1 & 1 & R BQ E1 CX1 & 1 & 1
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, >=99.0% (GC), powder
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, SAJ first grade, >=99.0%
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, tested according to Ph.Eur.
3,5-Di-tert-4-butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), analytical standard
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol 1000 microg/mL in Acetonitrile
Butylhydroxytoluene, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, certified reference material, TraceCERT(R)
Butylated Hydroxytoluene, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
Butylated hydroxytoluene, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard

Synonyms
Advastab 401
Agidol
Alkofen BP
Antioxidant 4
Antioxidant 29
Antioxidant 30
Antioxidant DBPC
Antioxidant 4K
Antioxidant KB
Buks
Butylhydroxytoluene
CA0-1
CA0-3
Catalin CA0-3
Chemanox 11
Dalpac
DBPC
Deenax
Dibunol
Dibutylated hydroxytoluene
Di-tert-butyl-para-cresol
ortho,ortho'-Di-tert-butyl-para-cresol
1,3-Di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzene
3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
E 321
Impruvol
Ionol
Ionole
Kerabit
4-Methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol
NCI-CO3598
Nocrac 200
Nonox TBC
Parabar 441
Paranox 441
Stavox
Sumilizer BHT
Sustane BHT
Swanox BHT
Tenamene 3
Tenox BHT
Topanol
Toxolan P
Vanlube PC
Vanlube PCX
Vianol
Vulkanox KB
advastab 401
agidol
alkofen BP
annulex BHT
antioxidant 264
antioxidant 29
antioxidant 30
antioxidant 4
antioxidant DBPC
antioxidant KB
antioxidant MPJ
antioxidant T 501
antox QT
antracine 8
antrancine 8
B.H.T.
BHT
BHT (butylated hydroxy toluene) tech grade
BHT FCC/NF
2,6-bis(tert-    butyl)-4-methylphenol
catalin antioxydant 1
catalin CAO-3
chemanox 11
(2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-diylidene)-dimalononitrile
dalpac
deenax
2,6-di-(tert-butyl)-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-t-butyl-p-cresol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-1-hydroxy-4-methylbenzene
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-cresol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylhydroxybenzene
2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-methylphenol
2,6-di-tert-butyl-para-cresol
2,6-di-tert-butylcresol
2,6-bis(1,1-    dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol
embanox BHT
hydagen DEO
butylatedhydroxy toluene
butylatedhydroxy toluene (BHT) N.F. grade powder (40 mesh)
4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butyltoluene
1-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylbenzene
butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) N.F. grade powder (60 mesh)
butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) FCC grade
butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) N.F. grade
butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) NF & EP grade
butylatedhydroxytoluene NF & EP grade powder (325 mesh)
butylatedhydroxytoluene NF & EP grade powder (60 mesh)
butylatedhydroxytoluene NF & EP grade powder (80 mesh)
impruvol
ional
kerabit
4-methyl-2,6-di-t-butyl-phenol
4-methyl-2,6-ditertbutylphenol
4-methyl-2,6-tert-butylphenol
nocrac 200
nonox TBC
parabar
paranox 441
tenox BHT food-grade antioxidant
vianol

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