CARNAUBA WAX

Carnauba wax = Brazil wax = Palm wax

CAS: 8015-86-9
EC Number: 232-399-4

Carnauba wax, also called Brazil wax and palm wax, is a wax of the leaves of the carnauba palm Copernicia prunifera (Synonym: Copernicia cerifera), a plant native to and grown only in the northeastern Brazilian states of Pernambuco, Piauí, Ceará, Maranhão, Bahia, and Rio Grande do Norte.
Carnauba wax is known as "queen of waxes" and in Carnauba waxs pure state, usually comes in the form of hard yellow-brown flakes. 
Carnauba wax is obtained from the leaves of the carnauba palm by collecting and drying them, beating them to loosen the wax, and then refining and bleaching the wax.
As a food additive, Carnauba waxs E number is E903.
Carnauba wax is an ultimate finishing wax. 
Carnauba wax is a pre-softened paste wax which brings out the wet look on any painted surface while also providing protection. 
Carnauba wax is highly recommended for dark color cars. 

Carnauba wax, also called Brazil wax or ceara wax, a vegetable wax obtained from the fronds of the carnauba tree (Copernicia cerifera) of Brazil. 
Valued among the natural waxes for Carnauba waxs hardness and high melting temperature, carnauba wax is employed as a food-grade polish and as a hardening or gelling agent in a number of products.
The finest grade of Carnauba wax. 
The hardest and best known wax derived from a special Brazilian tree. 
3D Carnauba Wax is the ultimate liquid cream finishing wax. 
Carnauba wax is a pre-softened emulsified version of the popular 3D Carnauba paste wax which brings out the wettest look on any painted surface.

Carnauba wax can produce a glossy finish and as such, is used in automobile waxes, shoe polishes, dental floss, food products such as sweets, instrument polishes, and floor and furniture waxes and polishes, especially when mixed with beeswax and with turpentine. 
Use for paper coatings is the most common application in the United States.
Carnauba wax was commonly used in its purest form as a coating on speedboat hulls in the early 1960s to enhance speed and aid in handling in salt water environments.
Carnauba wax is also the main ingredient in surfboard wax, combined with coconut oil.

What is carnauba wax famous for? 
Well, Carnauba wax has found widespread use in many industries due to an impressive list of characteristics. 

These include:
-High melting temperature (81-86°C;180-187°F)
-Protection from UV rays
-Resistance to water
-Hypoallergenic properties

Applications of Carnauba Wax
The fact that carnauba wax has such a high melting temperature has set Carnauba wax apart from other natural waxes, particularly beeswax. 
With Carnauba waxs hypoallergenic properties, Carnauba wax serves as a type of coating for various confectionery products and also acts as a binding agent. 
This prevents products such as chocolate and candy from melting at room temperature. 
Additionally, Carnauba wax does all this while also being safe for human consumption.

These same traits also make Carnauba wax quite applicable in the cosmetic industry, namely, in the production of lipsticks, foundations, deodorants, and various skincare products. 
We can also find Carnauba wax in mascaras, eyeliners, and eyeshadows. 
However, there have been reports of Carnauba wax causing dry eye syndrome, which leads to dry, irritated and itchy eyes.
Carnauba wax also acts as a tablet-coating agent in the pharmaceutical industry, as a thin coat of Carnauba wax aids in swallowing.
In addition, carnauba wax’s most common industrial use is as a paper coating, and Carnauba wax can also be used in polishes for instruments, furniture, and floors.

Because of Carnauba waxs hypoallergenic and emollient properties as well as Carnauba waxs gloss, carnauba wax appears as an ingredient in many cosmetics formulas, where Carnauba wax is used to thicken lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, deodorant, various skincare preparations, sun care preparations, etc.
Carnauba wax is also used to make cutler's resin.
Carnauba wax is the finish of choice for most briar tobacco or smoking pipes. 
Carnauba wax produces a high gloss finish when buffed that dulls with time rather than flaking off (as is the case with most other finishes used).
Although too brittle to be used by itself, carnauba wax is often combined with other waxes (principally beeswax) to treat and waterproof many leather products, where Carnauba wax provides a high-gloss finish and increases leather's hardness and durability.

In the food industry, carnauba wax is popularly used to keep candy coatings shiny, as well as protecting them against melting—it’s what makes sure your M&Ms melt in your mouth and not in your hand. 
Carnauba wax’s found in fruit snacks and gummy candies, where Carnauba wax provides texture and stability. 
Carnauba wax’s also used as a coating on fresh fruits and vegetables to keep them looking attractive, as well as for protecting them during the shipping process. 
So while wax sounds unappealing, remember carnauba is natural and plant-derived—and the alternative is a melted candy.

Carnauba Wax Origin
Carnauba wax is a natural wax. 
Carnauba wax comes from the leaves of the Copernicia prunifera palm grown only in Brazil. 
The wax is obtained by beating the wax off of the dried palm fronds and then refining it for use. 
The pure wax is yellow in color.

Carnauba wax comes from carnauba palm leaves. 
Carnauba wax is collected by drying out the leaves, beating them to loosen the wax, and refining and bleaching the wax to use in various applications. 
Since carnauba wax comes from a plant, Carnauba wax is considered a natural plant wax. 
Carnauba wax is also sometimes referred to as palm wax.

Along with the protective qualities, Carnauba wax gives any surface a glossy and shiny finish. 
Carnauba wax helps protect Carnauba wax from water damage since carnauba wax is not soluble in water. 
If any comes in contact with the surface, Carnauba wax won't manage to get through the layer of carnauba wax.

This hydrophobic property comes in handy with leather. 
The same principle stands. 
The wax serves as a shield while also making the leather appear more reflective and glossier.

What is Carnauba Wax Used for in the Automotive Industry?
Since carnauba wax is naturally hard, car wax manufacturers mix Carnauba wax with solvents and oils to achieve a more malleable form. 
These mostly include beeswax and petroleum distillates.

There are three grades of carnauba wax purity: T1, T3, and T4. 
T1 is the purest and is used in the production of the so-called white/Ivory wax. 
Despite the name, carnauba wax is not naturally white but is rather bleached since it may leave an opaque tint.

Some manufacturers will tout that their car wax is 100% carnauba wax. 
This is somewhat deceptive since the 100% isn’t in reference to the contents of the car wax. 
Carnauba wax indicates whether any other wax is present. 
The very best carnauba wax is only ⅓ natural carnauba. 
Otherwise, Carnauba wax would be too hard to spread evenly.

The wax forms a thin layer over the paint once applied. 
This layer acts as a shield that protects the paint from damage. 
Apart from the previously mentioned beneficial characteristics, the wax also helps prevent paint chips due to the reduced friction between the car and anything Carnauba wax meets. 
What’s more, Carnauba wax keeps your car clean since you can simply wash off any dirt or bugs.

Carnauba wax is shiny, which is perfect for giving a glossy look to many products. 
Carnauba wax also has waterproofing qualities when applied to certain products. 
Carnauba wax is brittle when used alone, so Carnauba wax is often combined with another wax type.

Carnauba Wax Chemical Composition
Carnauba wax consists of fatty acid esters (80-85%), fatty alcohols (10-16%), acids (3-6%) and hydrocarbons (1-3%). 
Carnauba wax is around 20% esterified fatty diols, 10% methoxylated or hydroxylated cinnamic acid, and 6% hydroxylated fatty acids.

Carnauba wax is a popular wax used in emulsions, which are stable mixtures of one or more waxes in water. 
This wax emulsion is often used in creams and ointments to thicken them.

Since carnauba wax is shiny, Carnauba wax is often used in polishes, including car, shoe and floor polish. 
Carnauba wax is also used as a shiny coating on produce, like apples and cucumbers. 
The shiny wax coating does more than just make the floor or fruit look good, Carnauba wax also adds a protective layer.

Food-grade carnauba wax is used in a variety of foods and candies, including fruit snacks, Skittles and M&Ms. 
The wax is used to give these candies a shiny appearance and help prevent them from melting quickly. 
Carnauba wax is safe to eat food-grade carnauba wax.

Properties and Uses
Carnauba wax has a very high melting point of 82-86 °C (180-187 °F). 
Carnauba wax is harder than concrete and nearly insoluble in water and ethanol. 
Carnauba wax is non-toxic and hypoallergenic. 
Carnauba wax can be polished to a high gloss.

Carnauba wax is a derived from the leaves of the Brazilian palm tree and is extensively used as a coating and glazing agent to impart a characteristic shine on the product. 
The wax is predominantly manufactured in Brazil and transported to the rest of the world depending on the demand. 
The demand for the product is expected to be driven by increasing use in application industries such as cosmetics, food, and automotive.

Carnauba wax type 3 is the most widely used product due to Carnauba waxs versatility in use for various applications including food and automotive. 
The increasing use of the product in automotive care waxes and polishes is expected to drive the demand for the product over the next eight years. 
The demand for food grade carnauba wax type 3 is expected to be driven by the growing confectionery industry. 
Growing demand for confectionery products such as sugar coated chocolate and sugar coated candies is likely to drive the market growth.

The demand for the wax is likely to be driven by the growing use as a mold release agent. 
Increasing use of carnauba wax type 4 as an ingredient in industrial coatings. 
Growing demand for automotive care waxes coupled with rising concerns regarding automobile care is expected to drive the demand for carnauba wax over the next eight years.

The market has witnessed some technology advances, primarily pertaining to wax extraction and there were no notable advances pertaining to the wax production and processing techniques. 
The market growth was bolstered by highly favorable regulations pertaining to the use of the wax as a glazing agent in edible products such as candies, chocolates, and cosmetics. 
Also, adoption of the wax as a coating material for pharmaceutical controlled release systems has driven its demand in the pharmaceutical industry.

The carnauba wax production has remained highly stable due to the availability of a large number of substitutes such as beeswax and candelilla wax coupled with relatively higher prices. 
However, superior properties of the product such as permeability and shine has led to its widespread use in application industries.

CAS Number: 8015-86-9
EC Number: 232-399-4
MDL number: MFCD00130724
NACRES: NA.23

Carnauba wax is an extremely useful natural renewable resource used as a coating for some of our candies. 
Carnauba wax is harvested from the leaves of the Carnauba palm which is only grown in certain regions of Brazil. 
Carnauba wax should not be confused with palm oil palms grown in Southeast Asia.
The wax is harvested following traditional procedures. 
Palm leaves are cut and dried in the sun. 
The wax is then obtained from a film powder that coats the leaves. 
After cutting, the trees then continue to grow new leaves until the next harvest. 
The process does not damage the trees and the use of carnauba wax creates an economic incentive to keep these trees standing.

Carnauba wax is acquired from the leaf of the carnauba palm tree. 
Given that the plant is native to northern Brazil, which has a very hot and humid climate, the wax is necessary for the plant’s survival. 
Carnauba wax serves as a protective layer that shields the leaves from heat, UV rays, and water. 
These are all useful traits, not only for the tree but for your vehicle.

But what is carnauba wax? 
In Carnauba waxs natural form, the wax is a yellow, hard, flaky substance. 
To obtain Carnauba wax, the leaves are gathered, dried and beaten to loosen Carnauba wax.

Carnauba wax is a vegetable wax obtained from the leaves of a Brazilian palm tree (Copernica cerifera) known as the “Tree of Life.” 
Carnauba wax is the hardest natural wax available. Carnauba wax is a wonderful ingredient to use in natural cosmetics and personal care products. 
Commonly found in lipsticks and lip balms, Carnauba wax may also be used in salves, balms, lipsticks, mascaras and creams. 
Carnauba wax is a great alternative to beeswax, and a crucial ingredient in the vegan cosmetics industry. 
To use Carnauba wax in your formulation, Carnauba wax must be heated to a higher melting point than beeswax. 
Carnauba wax requires a temperature of 180-185 degrees in order to melt. 
Please note that Carnauba wax is harder than beeswax, and this must be taken into consideration when incorporating it into your formulations.

The reason people swear by carnauba wax is the effect Carnauba wax has on the paint and the look of the car. 
Carnauba wax gives off a deep, clear, color and an impeccable mirror shine. 
Furthermore, since the wax has a high melting temperature, there’s no chance of the car getting damaged even on the hottest of summer days.
Since Carnauba wax is also resistant to UV rays, carnauba wax provides complete protection from the sun. 
UV rays can cause oxidation, fading, and discoloration. 
This means that applying a layer of wax can save you the cost of polishing or repainting your car.
As a result of carnauba wax being hydrophobic (resistant to water), the wax layer prevents any water from getting to your paint. 

General description
Carnauba wax No.1 yellow(CW) is an ester based wax that can be extracted from palm leaves. 
The composition of this wax contains aliphatic esters, ω-hydroxy esters and unsaturated alcohols. 
Carnauba wax can be used as a glossing agent in a variety of pharmaceutical products.

Application
CW may be used as a hydrophobic excipient which can be used to modify the kinetics of polymeric gel in a drug releasing system. 
Carnauba wax can be used in dry polymeric coatings which can increase the crystallization and improve the stability of amorphous solid drug formulations. 
Carnauba wax may also be used as a component of lipids which can be used to tune and improve the flowability and designing of solid drugs.

INGREDIENT PROFILE
Carnauba Wax, often called Brazil Wax, is the hardest natural occurring wax. 
Carnauba wax has a very mild odor and is typically light yellow in color, yet can range from yellow to brown to even green. 
Carnauba wax has a lustrous shine.

DERIVED FROM
Carnauba Wax is produced by the Carnauba Palm, which can grow up to 50 feet tall. 
While Carnauba wax is grown throughout South America and Equatorial Africa, Carnauba wax is only harvested from the trees grown in Brazil. 
There, during the hot, dry days between September and March, the leaves excrete wax to conserve moisture and protect the tree against dehydration. 
To harvest the wax, each leaf is removed individually, sun-dried, and then thrashed to remove the wax. 
To preserve the health of the tree, no more than 20 leaves are removed from each tree.

PROPERTIES
-Used as a thickening agent
-Help create a smooth and glossy finish 
-Helps a product maintain solid form, while remaining flexible  

SKIN CARE BENEFITS AND USES
-Efficient emollient, which helps make skin soft and smooth
-Gives a glossy finish

Rainwater is full of pollutants and contaminants. 
Once the rain has evaporated, all that pollution stays on your car and etches into the paint. 
This leads to unsightly marks all over your car, which might also cost you a paint job. 
Luckily, the wax prevents this since the rain that meets the car does not stay on the car but rather slides off, carrying the contaminants along with Carnauba wax.
Another great benefit to waxing your car is that the wax fills up scratches. 
If you notice some shallow scratches, apply a layer of wax. 
Carnauba wax will go into the gap the scratch has left and smooth out the surface. 
Carnauba wax will not get rid of the scratches but will make them a lot less noticeable or even invisible.

The carnauba palm tree can produce up to 60 leaves. 
However, in order to avoid harming the tree, only 10-20 leaves are harvested from each plant. 
Harvesting more could lead to a stunt in the tree’s growth and even its death.

Description: Natural vegetable wax exuded by the leaves of a palm tree (copernicia cerifera) growing in Brazil, hardest natural wax available, composed of wax esters (85%), free fatty acids, fatty alcohols & resins (15%). 
Type 3 grade. 
Yellow flakes or powder, no or faint odor. 
Soluble in alcohol, insoluble in water. 
Melting point 80-85°C/176-185°F.

CAS: 8015-86-9

INCI Name: Copernicia prunifera (carnauba) wax

Benefits:
-Non-gelling thickener, viscosity and consistency enhancer
-Provides good texture and stability due to high melting point
-Has emollient and moisturizing properties
-Has good skin protective properties

Use: Warm to melt before use. Add to fat phase in formulas requiring emulsification. Typical use level 2-40%. For external use only.

Carnauba wax Applications: Creams, salves, ointments, protective creams, balms, pomades, lipsticks, mascaras, lip gloss.

The combination of properties leads to many applications, including use in food, cosmetics, automobile and furniture wax, molds for semiconductor devices, and as a coating for dental floss.
You use products that contain carnauba wax every day, though you may not have known what the ingredient was or where it came from. 
Carnauba wax is one of those extremely useful natural chemicals and renewable resources that doesn't have a synthetic equivalent.
As for my car smelling like candy: the wax does have a distinctive sweet scent. 
Carnauba wax might be more accurate to say many car waxes and candies smell like carnauba wax.

Carnauba wax is also used in the pharmaceutical industry as a tablet-coating agent. 
Adding the carnauba wax aids in the swallowing of tablets for patients. 
A very small amount (less than a hundredth of one percent by weight, i.e., 30 grams for a 300 kg batch) is sprinkled onto a batch of tablets after they have been sprayed and dried. 
The wax and tablets are then tumbled together for a few minutes before being discharged from the tablet-coating machine.
In 1890, Charles Tainter patented the use of carnauba wax on phonograph cylinders as a replacement for a mixture of paraffin and beeswax.

Carnauba wax is a thickener that also provides a smooth, glossy finish to balms. 
Carnauba wax is very emollient with a high melting point. 
Carnauba wax is a natural product obtained from the processing of the powder exuded from the leaves of the carnauba palm tree (Latin name: Copernicia cerifera). 
To protect itself against dehydration during the period of drought that severely affects the Northeast region of Brazil every year for more than six months, the Carnauba covers its leaves with a thick layer of wax consisting primarily of esters, alcohols and fatty acids of high molecular weight.
Once the leaves have been collected, they are dried out and beaten for the wax to loosen up. 
The wax is used all over the world by various industries, such as in the manufacture of polishing wax (floors, shoes, cars etc.), in the paper and packaging industries, in making paints and other coatings, in the cosmetic industry (lipsticks, balms), in the food industry (bubble gum, chocolate, fruits), as well as in the pharmaceutical industry as vehicle and excipient.

Carnauba Wax is both hypoallergenic and emollient, making Carnauba wax well suited to many cosmetic formulations where thickening as well as gloss are required. 
Due to Carnauba waxs high melt point, Carnauba wax can help to harden otherwise too-soft lip and body balms. 
On Carnauba waxs own, Carnauba wax is a brittle wax, hence Carnauba wax is typically combined with other waxes, primarily beeswax, in formulations. 
Carnauba Wax is considered vegan, and has little to no natural scent; because of this, Carnauba wax is very useful in many applications in cosmetics such as lip balms and lotion bars. 
Carnauba wax is worth noting that Carnauba Wax is harder than beeswax, and has a higher melting point, so your formulation may need some adjusting to accommodate the change in wax ratios when adding it to existing formulations.

Applications
-Lip balm and tube formulations
-Lipsticks
-Lotion bars
-Mascaras
-Pomades
-Ointments & salves
-Thickener for anhydrous, oil-based serums

INCI: Copernicia cerifera (carnauba) wax

Our organic carnauba wax is a vegetable wax obtained from the leaves of a Brazilian palm tree (Copernica cerifera), also known as the “Tree of Life.”
Carnauba wax is the hardest natural wax available. 
Commercially, Carnauba wax is widely used in the cosmetic, body care, food, pharmaceutical, automotive, and other industries. 
Carnauba wax is a wonderful ingredient to use in natural cosmetics and is extremely durable and dries to a glossy finish. 
Commonly found in lipsticks and lip balms, Carnauba wax may also be used in salves, balms, and in any recipe where beeswax is called for. 
Carnauba wax is a great alternative to beeswax, and a crucial ingredient in the vegan cosmetics industry.

To use carnauba wax in your recipe, Carnauba wax must be heated to a higher melting point than beeswax. 
Carnauba wax requires a temperature of 180-185 degrees Fahrenheit in order to melt. 
Please note that carnauba wax is harder than beeswax which must be taken into consideration when incorporating Carnauba wax into your recipes.
The palm species which our carnauba wax is derived from flourishes naturally in Brazil. 
This is not the same species that palm oil is pressed from, and is a tree that grows wildly in native forests. 
Once a year the leaves are pruned by hand, and this harvesting practice allows the trees to continue with their natural growth cycles. 
There has never been an instance where this tree was considered threatened or a threat to the environment.

A vegetable wax from Brazil harvested from the leaves of the Carnauba palm tree. 
Carnauba wax is harder and has a higher melting temperature than beeswax. 
Since carnauba is easier to melt than damar resin, Carnauba wax is sometimes substituted for damar or combined with the damar to make encaustic medium.

Carnauba wax is obtained from the leaves of the palm tree known as Copernicia Cerifera, which is also referred to as the “Tree of Life”. 
The Carnauba palm flourishes in northeastern regions within Brazil and proliferates naturally along riverbanks, streams and damp low-lands.

The tree exudes wax through the petioles of Carnauba waxs fan-shaped leaves, which prevent dehydration in the equatorial climate. 
The palm leaves, harvested in the dry months occurring from September through February are sun-dried and mechanically thrashed to separate the wax from the leaf. 
The color and quality of the wax are governed by the age of the leaves and are used in processing.

Carnauba wax is the wax of the leaves of the Copernicia Prunifera (also known as Copernicia Cerifera) that grows wildly in northern Brazil. 
Carnauba wax is known as the "queen of waxes" as one of the hardest botanical waxes. 
Due to its high melting point, Carnauba wax is used for thermoresistance lipsticks, eyeliners and lip liners, as well as mascara.
Carnauba wax prevents cosmetic products from feeling sticky and leaves it with a dry effect. 
Carnauba wax has water-repellent, protecting and slightly film-forming properties in skin emulsions. 
Hair is provided with more shine.

Carnauba wax is considered among the hardest of natural waxes and produces a very durable film. 
Carnauba wax has a high melt point, enhances oil retention, is valued as a stable co-emulsifier agent and is an exceptional polishing aid.

Carnauba wax is the hardest natural wax in the face of the Earth. 
Carnauba wax is also called palm wax or Brazil wax, which is derived from the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba tree (also called the ‘tree of life’).

Grade
This is No. 1 Yellow (Type 1) National Formulary (NF) grade of Carnauba wax. 
This grade is a cosmetic, pharmaceutical and confectionery grade product.

Carnauba wax comes from a Brazilian palm tree called Copernica Cerifera and is derived from the fronds, which are cut, shredded and dried. 
The wax then flakes off in a powdery form, which is melted, strained, purified and shaped into blocks for commercial use.

Carnava wax is the most used wax in plant-derived waxes.
Carnauba wax is characterized by its very hard and high melting point among natural waxes, and Carnauba wax is excellent in glossiness, mold releasability, emulsifiability and dispersibility.
Carnauba wax is used for a variety of other purposes, including thermal transfer inks, toners, polishes, and cosmetics.

Carnauba wax is a wax from the leaves of the palm copernicia prunifera, a plant found in northeastern Brazil. 
Carnauba wax is harvested by pulling the leaves off the tree (recent sustainable practice recommends no more than 10 leaves at a time to keep the tree healthy). 
Carnauba wax is hypoallergenic, very emollient, and has a high melting point, making Carnauba wax one of the preferred ingredients for thickening eye makeup and skincare products.
Carnauba wax is often used alongside other thickening ingredients, such as cocoa butter or beeswax, to add hardness to the texture of a product. 
Carnauba wax also creates a protective layer and adds shine and glow to the skin and hair.
“Carnauba wax has very good emulsification properties and excellent oil-binding capacity for ester oils and mineral oils,” explains Simon Badal, head of the pharmaceuticals department at the University of West Indies. 
“Carnauba wax also raises the melting point of gels, thus making Carnauba wax the preferred additives in lipsticks, lip balms, and mascara. 
Carnauba wax provides glossy and slippery surfaces.”

Compatibility
Carnauba wax is compatible with most vegetable and mineral waxes and a large variety of natural and synthetic resins.

Applications
Applications suitable for this grade of Carnauba wax include cosmetics, ointments, tablet coatings, candles, confections, investment casting, auto, floor and shoe polishes, inks and paper coatings, and fruit coatings.

Carnauba Wax is obtained from the leaves of the palm tree known in Latin as ‘Copernica Cerifera’, which is also referred to as the "Tree of Life". 
The Carnauba palm flourishes in northeastern regions within Brazil, and proliferates naturally along riverbanks, streams and damp low-lands.

The tree exudes wax through the petioles of Carnauba waxs fan-shaped leaves, which prevent dehydration in the equatorial climate. 
The palm leaves, harvested in the dry months occurring from September through February are sun-dried and mechanically thrashed to separate the wax from the leaf. 
The color and quality of the wax are governed by the age of the leaves and care used in processing.

Strahl & Pitsch produces a cosmetic, pharmaceutical and confectionery grade product as well as a USDA Certified Organic product. 
We also offer grades suitable for a wide range of industrial applications.

Carnauba Wax is considered among the hardest of natural waxes and produces a very durable film. 
Carnauba wax has a high melt point, enhances oil retention, is valued as a stable co-emulsifier agent and is an exceptional polishing aid.

Carnauba Wax is an all natural vegetable wax harvested from the leaves of the Brazilian palm tree Copernicia cerifera. 
Carnauba wax is produced and sold in different grades with T1 being the highest quality and purity available making it perfect for personal care products. 
Carnauba wax has good emoliant properties and helps thicken and soften skin care products. 
T-1 grade is lighter in color than other less quality grades in the industry and Carnauba wax is known as the hardest natural wax available in small flake form. 
Carnauba T-1 has a high melting point and light aroma which makes Carnauba wax an awesome hardener additive for softer natural waxes such as coconut and soy. 
Carnauba T-1 is widely used in cosmetic, food and industrial applications such as deodorants, hair products, lipstick, mascara and facial creams. 
Carnauba wax is used on many edible goods such as fresh fruit, nuts, coffee beans, fruit chews and hard candies to give them a glossy finish and Carnauba wax is often blended with other waxes to create polishes and finishes such as car wax.

GRADES AVAILABLE:
No #1 Yellow (Type 1)
NC #3 Light(Type 3)
NC #3 Dark (Type 4-Filtered)

Carnauba wax APPLICATIONS INCLUDE:
Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, Ointments, Tablet Coatings, Candles, Confections, Investment Casting, Auto, Floor and Shoe Polishes, Carbon Paper, Inks and Paper Coatings, Fruit Coatings.

Carnauba wax COMPATIBILITY:
Carnauba Wax is compatible with most vegetable and mineral waxes and a large variety of natural and synthetic resins

Carnauba wax may be used as a mold release agent for manufacture of fibre-reinforced plastics. 
An aerosol mold release agent is formed by dissolving carnauba wax in a solvent. 
Unlike silicone or PTFE, carnauba is suitable for use with liquid epoxy, epoxy molding compounds (EMC), and some other plastic types and generally enhances their properties. 
Carnauba wax is not very soluble in chlorinated or aromatic hydrocarbons.
Carnauba is used in melt/castable explosives to produce an insensitive explosive formula such as Composition B, which is a blend of RDX and TNT.

Carnauba wax is native to Brazil. 
Carnauba wax comes from a palm known as the Copernica prunifera. 
This palm only occurs in the northeastern states of Brazil. 
The wax occurs on the leaves of the palm during dry, hot weather. 
Carnauba wax’s a natural means of protecting the leaves from the elements.

In order to harvest the wax, workers beat the leaves as a means of removing the wax. 
Carnauba wax fall off as flakes, and workers then collect Carnauba wax for processing and storage.

However, in recent years, a greater awareness about the ecological effects of harvesting the wax has lead to workers only removing up to 10 -20 leaves from a given tree at any time. 
This is due to the fact that by removing more than 10-20 leaves, you stunt the tree’s growth. 
This can ultimately cause Carnauba wax to die off slowly.

This in turn, has a very negative effect for the surrounding ecosystem that may be dependent on these trees. 
So Carnauba wax’s important that governments enforce these regulations.

During the processing stage, workers grind the flakes into a finer powder or keep them in their natural state. 
In some cases, they dissolve the flakes in aliphatic solvents. 
These are petroleum-based chemicals such as paraffin, iso-paraffin or cyclic paraffins.

To sum up, using products that contain carnauba wax is a very effective way of keeping your car looking excellent all year round. 
Since it provides great protection from all types of climates, UV rays and can even prevent or cover up scratches. 
All those benefits also come with a glossy finish worthy of any showroom. 
Carnauba wax's no wonder carnauba is used in a number of wax products.
Apart from this, Carnauba wax also helps protect many other day-to-day objects, as its properties are quite useful. 
Given that Carnauba wax is safe for humans, the only aspect limiting Carnauba waxs use is Carnauba waxs availability, but further development might solve this.

What is Carnauba wax?
Carnauba wax (Copernicia cerifera) is a natural wax made from the leaves of the Brazilian wax palm tree. 

What does Carnauba wax do?
Carnauba wax is used alongside beeswax and joboba in our Dental Floss to help the floss glide smoothly between teeth while remaining gentle on gums.

How is Carnauba wax made?
Our Stewardship Model guides us to select ingredients which have been processed in a manner that supports our philosophy of human and environmental health.
Carnauba wax is collected from the leaves of the wax palm tree, then purified in boiling water, filtered and refined.

What are the alternatives for Carnauba wax?
Candelilla wax, beeswax or vegetable oils are natural alternatives. 
Synthetic beeswax or petroleum-derived waxes like paraffin can be used as an alternative to natural carnauba wax, but they do not meet our Stewardship Model standards for natural, responsible and sustainable.

Is Carnauba wax the right option for me?
Carnauba wax is nontoxic and is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as both a direct and indirect food additive .
This is part of a process that can ultimately create a stronger form of the wax that is free of any unnecessary chemical constituents that may form a part of the natural composition of the wax. 
Thus, Carnauba wax is more suitable for industrial use.
However, this seems to be one of the issues that most homoeopaths point out as being problematic for the long-term health benefits of using carnauba wax over time. 

Grade: Type 1 NF
Form: Flakes
Melting Point (Open Cap. Tube USP Class II): 80–86° C
Flash Point, Miniwaxı (ASTM D92-78): 310–318° C
Acid Value: 2–7
Saponification Value: 78–95
Paraffinic Hydrocarbons: 2% Maxiwaxı
Color: Yellow

Organic Carnauba Wax (Copernicia prunifera)
Organic carnauba wax is also commonly referred to as Brazil wax and even palm wax. 
Carnauba wax is made from the leaves of the copernicia prunifera palm by drying the leaves, beating them, and then separating the loosened wax. 
Carnauba wax is then refined and bleached. 
Carnauba wax is a great ingredient for being able to protect dog paws and relieve dry and painful conditions.
Carnauba wax is comprised of aliphatic esters mostly but also contains fatty acids. 
What is most distinctive about carnauba wax is the high quantity of diesters in Carnauba wax.

Why Use Organic Carnauba Wax for Dogs
When you’re looking to protect your dog’s paws from dry and potentially painful conditions, you may be looking for all natural products. 
In fact, that is the best solution because products that are not considered all natural may contain some natural ingredients, but they will be modified with chemicals to provide faster results, though they can often be harmful.
Carnauba wax is an all natural ingredient that is highly effective as a paw protectant because it has strong emollient properties, which means it helps to smooth out and soften skin. 
That provides comfort and relief to dogs that are dealing with dry, chapped, and even cracked skin on their paws, snout, and elsewhere.
Carnauba wax is a durable wax so that means Carnauba wax will last a long time and hold up under some tough conditions, including heat.

Essential Properties of Organic Carnauba Wax
There are several grades of carnauba wax, labeled T1, T3, and T4. 
The labels essentially refer to the purity level of the wax. 
In order to purify carnauba wax, Carnauba wax goes through filtration, centrifugation, and bleaching.

Carnauba wax is mostly made up of esters, accounting for 40% of Carnauba waxs composition. 
Carnauba wax is nearly insoluble in water and is considered non-toxic and hypoallergenic. 
This makes Carnauba wax a safe ingredient to be using in a paw protectant.

The Brazilian palm tree from which carnauba wax is known as the ‘Tree of Life’ and for good reason. 
Carnauba wax offers some great healing and protective properties and this wax is one of the hardest natural waxes found anywhere in the world.
Carnauba wax dries to a glossy finish and is harder than beeswax, which means careful consideration has to be made with regard to how much is used in a salve, ointment, or cream.

With organic carnauba wax, Carnauba wax is a great way to help smooth the skin and texture of the paws and protect them for the future. 
With regard to any paw protectant, carnauba wax adds value and offers your dog the ability to feel more comfortable and alleviate some of the pain Carnauba waxs paws may be causing at the moment.

INCI-NAME:
copernica cerifera cera

DESCRIPTION:
CosVivet Carnauba waxis obtained from the Copernicia Cerifera palm tree indigenous to Brazil. 
This wax is obtained from the young leaves of the waxes and fulfils the purity requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia. 
Carnauba wax has a pleasant odour and is supplied in flake form.

APPLICATION:
Due to Carnauba waxs hardness and Carnauba waxs high melting point, carnauba wax is mainly used in cosmetic stick formulations. 
However, Carnauba wax can also be used in sun care, make up, mascara and other decorative cosmetic applications. 
Because of its high melting point, Carnauba wax can improve the temperature stability of formulations.

Also, Carnauba wax provides hardness and surface gloss to products and improves mould release. 
Carnauba wax is often used in combination with other waxes to improve the viscosity and the plasticity and increase the melting point of the final product.

Grapefruit treatment with a coating of chitosan or carnauba wax containing benzoic or sorbic acids, and their salts, was successfully used on fruit. 
The effects of different concentrations of organic acids, their salts, chitosan, and fungicide sodium ortho-phenyl-phenate were evaluated on growth and spore production. 
Organic acids and salts showed superior efficacy to the fungicide against fruit decay. 
Use of citric acid (1%) and calcium chloride (10%) in the coating of sodium alginate were tested with success on minimally processed lampascioni (Muscari comosum) and fresh-cut ‘Madrigal’ artichokes. 
Potassium sorbate in carboxy-methylcellulose-based coating was applied to pistachios. 

An antimicrobial coating containing organic acids was found effective against several molds isolated from fruits. 
The incorporation of potassium sorbate in pea starch and guar gum coatings improved the antifungal effectiveness better than the direct application by aqueous solution. 
The impact of edible coating with or without potassium sorbate on aerobic microbial growth was investigated using potato. 
During refrigerated storage, the use of coating led to a significant reduction of the maxiwaxı microbial load. 
Coating with antimicrobial compounds helped to extend the lag phase and postpone time to reach maxiwaxı load by almost four days, compared to the control coating.

Carnauba wax has a melting point of 180-187 °F, making Carnauba wax the hardest commercially available, natural wax. 
Carnauba wax sets harder than concrete, is nearly insoluble in water and ethanol, and can be polished to a highly glossy sheen. 
Carnauba wax’s non-toxic and hypoallergenic, and its durability makes Carnauba wax a popular material for use in myriad products and industries, from floor waxes to dessert toppings. 
Carnauba wax’s often found in vegan cosmetics and other beauty products as a replacement for beeswax, and it’s used in pharmaceuticals as a coating for pills. 
Carnauba wax’s even the coating responsible for helping your dental floss glide easily between your pearly whites.

Carnauba Wax is a new cream wax dedicated to making surfaces completely glow. 
UV blocking Carnauba and other essential oils give you lustrous shine and protection. 
Easily applied by hand or machine.

Carnauba consists mostly of aliphatic esters (40 wt%), diesters of 4-hydroxycinnamic acid (21.0 wt%), ω-hydroxycarboxylic acids (13.0 wt%), and fatty alcohols (12 wt%). 
The compounds are predominantly derived from acids and alcohols in the C26-C30 range. 
Distinctive for carnauba wax is the high content of diesters as well as methoxycinnamic acid.

General Information
Carnauba wax T1 is obtained from the leaves of a palm tree named Copernica cerifera, indigenous to northern Brasil. 
The wax protects the plant against the environment and prevents excessive evaporation. 
Carnauba wax consists mainly of esters (ca. 85 %), free long chain fatty alcohols (ca. 13 %), and free fatty acids and resins. 
This very hard natural wax is mainly used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical stick formulations.

Applications
Sticks, make-up, mascara, decorative cosmetics, sun care, food, candles, furniture and car polishes.

Advantages
Carnauba wax provides good mould release, hardness,consistency, surface gloss and ease of application. 
Because carnauba wax has the highest melting point among the natural waxes Carnauba wax is suitable for improving the temperature stability of many cosmetic products.

Carnauba wax is sold in several grades, labeled T1, T3, and T4, depending on the purity level. 
Purification is accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, and bleaching.

Carnauba wax has various applications and uses and these include food, cosmetics, automobile and furniture wax, molds for semiconductors devices, and as coating for dental floss.
Carnauba wax has very good emulsification properties and excellent oil-binding capacity for ester oils and mineral oils. 
Carnauba wax also raises the melting point of gels, thus making Carnauba wax the preferred additives in lipsticks, lip balms, and mascara. 
Carnauba wax provides glossy and slippery surfaces.

Carnauba wax can form solvent resistant superhydrophobic films from selfemulsifying mixtures with alcohol emulsions. 
These films are resistant to solvent etching by chloroform, toluene, acetone, and alcohols. 
Carnauba wax is used as a hardener for other waxes and to raise the melting points of wax mixtures. 
Carnauba wax is also a component of furniture, leather, and shoe polishes. 
In the cosmetic and food industries, carnauba wax is added to formulations of lipsticks and balms and chewing gum.

Carnauba, also called Brazil wax and palm wax, is a hard wax of the leaves of the palm Copernicia prunifera, a plant native to and grown only in the northeastern Brazilian states of Piauí, Ceará, and Rio Grande do Norte. 
Carnauba wax is known as "queen of waxes" and usually comes in the form of hard yellow-brown flakes. 
Carnauba wax is obtained from the leaves of the carnauba palm by collecting and drying them, beating them to loosen the wax, then refining and bleaching the wax.
Carnauba consists mostly of aliphatic esters (40 wt%), diesters of 4-hydroxycinnamic acid (21.0 wt%), ω-hydroxycarboxylic acids (13.0 wt%), and fatty acid alcohols (12 wt%). 
The compounds are predominantly derived from acids and alcohols in the C26-C30 range. 

Distinctive for carnauba wax is the high content of diesters as well as methoxycinnamic acid.
Yellow to greenish brown lumps packed in bags or boxes. 
Used in the manufacture of polished, varnished and insulating compounds. 
Because of Carnauba waxs hypoallergenic and emollient properties as well as Carnauba waxs shine, carnauba wax appears as an ingredient in many cosmetics formulas where Carnauba wax is used to thicken lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, deodorant, various skin care preparations, sun care preparations, etc. 
Carnauba wax is also used to make Cutler's resin.

Carnauba wax is the finish of choice for most briar tobacco or smoking pipes. 
Carnauba wax produces a high gloss finish when buffed on to wood. 
This finish dulls with time rather than flaking off (as is the case with most other finishes used).
In foods, Carnauba wax is used as a formulation aid, lubricant, release agent, anticaking agent, and surface finishing agent in baked foods and mixes, chewing gum, confections, frostings, fresh fruits and juices, gravies, sauces, processed fruits and juices, soft sweets, Tic Tacs, Altoids, and Swedish Fish.
Although too brittle to be used by itself, carnauba wax is often combined with other waxes (principally beeswax) to treat and waterproof many leather products where Carnauba wax provides a high-gloss finish and increases leather's hardness and durability.

Carnauba wax is also used in the pharmaceutical industry as a tablet-coating agent. 
Adding the carnauba wax aids in the swallowing of tablets for patients. 
A very small amount (less than a hundredth of 1 percent by weight. i.e.: 30 grams for a 300 kg batch) is sprinkled onto a batch of tablets after they've been sprayed and dried. 
The wax and tablets are then tumbled together for a few minutes before being discharged from the tablet-coating machine.
Carnauba wax is sold in several grades, labeled T1, T2, and T4, depending on the purity level. 
Purification is accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, and bleaching.

Carnauba wax can produce a glossy finish and as such is used in automobile waxes, shoe polishes, dental floss, food products such as sweets, instrument polishes, and floor and furniture waxes and polishes, especially when mixed with beeswax and with turpentine. 
Use for paper coatings is the most common application in the United States. 
Carnauba wax was commonly used in Carnauba waxs purest form as a coating on speedboat hulls in the early 60's to enhance speed & aid in handling in salt water environments. 
Carnauba wax is also the main ingredient in surfboard wax, combined with coconut oil.

Because of Carnauba waxs hypoallergenic and emollient properties as well as its shine, carnauba wax appears as an ingredient in many cosmetics formulas where Carnauba wax is used to thicken lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, deodorant, various skin care preparations, sun care preparations, etc. 
Carnauba wax is also used to make cutler's resin. 
A mixture of carnauba wax, beeswax, and olive oil is especially effective in removing adhesives.

Carnauba wax is the finish of choice for most briar tobacco or smoking pipes. 
Carnauba wax produces a high gloss finish when buffed on to wood. 
This finish dulls with time rather than flaking off (as is the case with most other finishes used).
Although too brittle to be used by itself, carnauba wax is often combined with other waxes (principally beeswax) to treat and waterproof many leather products where Carnauba wax provides a high-gloss finish and increases leather's hardness and durability.

Carnauba wax is also used in the pharmaceutical industry as a tablet-coating agent. 
Adding the carnauba wax aids in the swallowing of tablets for patients. 
A very small amount (less than a hundredth of one percent by weight, i.e., 30 grams for a 300 kg batch) is sprinkled onto a batch of tablets after they have been sprayed and dried. 
The wax and tablets are then tumbled together for a few minutes before being discharged from the tablet-coating machine.

An aerosol mold release is formed by suspending carnauba wax in a solvent. 
This aerosol version is used extensively in molds for semiconductor devices. 
Semiconductor manufacturers also use chunks of carnauba wax to break in new epoxy molds or to release the plunger when Carnauba wax sticks. 
When used as a mold release, carnauba, unlike silicone or PTFE, is suitable for use with liquid epoxy, epoxy molding compounds (EMC), and some other plastic types and generally enhances their properties.v

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