HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL


Hydrogenated Castor Oil = CASTOR WAX = HCO

Hydrogenated Castor Oil is a wax-like hydrogenated derivative of castor oil. Hydrogenated castor oil has many industrial applications.
Hydrogenated castor oil is insoluble in water and completely odourless. Concretely, Hydrogenated castor oil is produced during hydrogenation, a chemical reaction that takes place during the combination, by catalysis, of pure castor oil with hydrogen.

Castor wax, also called hydrogenated castor oil, is an opaque, white vegetable wax. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is produced by the hydrogenation of pure castor oil often in the presence of a nickel catalyst to increase the rate of reaction.
The hydrogenation of castor oil forms saturated molecules of castor wax; this saturation is responsible for the hard, brittle and insoluble nature of the wax.

Castor Wax can be used in all cosmetic and personal care products. Castor Wax is used to thicken emulsions, bind antiperspirants and can work to disperse pigments. 
Castor Wax is widely used in lip balms, anhydrous systems and color cosmetics.


Castor wax


Castor wax, also called hydrogenated castor oil, is a hard, brittle, vegetable wax. 
Castor wax is produced by the hydrogenation (chemical combination with hydrogen) of pure castor oil, in the presence of a nickel catalyst. 
Castor wax is odorless and insoluble in water.


Hydrogenated castor oil is a waxy compound obtained by the hydrogenation of refined castor oil. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is a hard product with a high melting point. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is almost odourless and tasteless. HCO is supplied in flakes and powder. Hydrogenated castor oil is cream to white coloured. 

Castor wax flakes can be heated beyond this range to create a liquid and the material will re-harden once the temperature cools. 
Castor wax flakes are produced through the chemical combination of hydrogen and pure castor oil. 
Castor wax is an odorless wax-like substance that is insoluble in water. 
Castor wax flakes are used in a variety of cosmetic and industrial applications. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil can be used effectively as a thickening agent for lotions and creams, and are commonly found in a wide range of cosmetic products such as lip balms, body creams, hair care products, eye makeup and face foundations. Industrial applications include polished, coatings, lubricants and auto maintenance products


Castor wax is a hard, brittle, high melting point wax that is insoluble in most organic solvents but is highly compatible with most resins and waxes.


Description: Vegetable-derived (vegan), hydrogenated castor oil derivative that is used as an emollient and thickener in a variety of cosmetic products. 
Off-white hard brittle wax, flakes/pastilles. Melting point 84-89°C (183-192°F). Not water-soluble, oil-soluble.
CAS: 8001-78-3
INCI Name: Hydrogenated castor oil

Benefits:
Increases viscosity in lotions, creams, and ointments
Stabilizes stick products and increases melting point of lip sticks and lip balms
Acts as effective emollient
Use: Add to hot oil phase of formulation until melted (melting point 84-89°C / 183-192°F). Typical use level 0.5-10%. For external use only.
Applications: Stick products, also deodorants, lip balms, pomades, foundations, creams, lotions.

CAS Number: 8001-78-3
EINECS/ELINCS No:232-292-2
C57H110O9
HCO


USES & APPLICATIONS
HCO is an extremely versatile oleochemical that has a number of industrial and manufacturing applications:
CASE: Because of its excellent resistance to moisture, Hydrogenated Castor Oil works extremely well as a viscosity modifier, and it also provides significant improvement in grease and oil resistance.
Plastics: Hydrogenated Castor Oil performs the role of a lubricant and release agent for PVC and improves processing, dispersion and grease resistance of sheeted polyethylene. 
It is also useful in the preparation of various polyurethane coating formulas.
Personal Care: There are multiple Hydrogenated Castor Oil uses in the manufacturing of personal care products, particularly as an emollient and thickening agent in ointments and deodorants, as well as hair care products and certain cosmetics.
Waxes: Hydrogenated Castor Oil works as a binding agent in synthetic and petroleum waxes, as it makes the wax harder and more resistant to crumbling.
Soaps and Detergents: Hydrogenated Castor Oil is sometimes used as an emulsifying agent in liquid soaps and detergents to enhance the stability of the liquid formula.
Textiles: HCO makes an effective processing agent in various textile manufacturing applications.
Lubricants and Greases: HCO is used as a thickening agent in lithium grease and lithium complex grease, as well as multipurpose greases and metal-drawing lubricants.

Castor Wax is a non-hygroscopic organic derivative of castor oil. 
Castor Wax is used as a rheology additive in oil and alkyd paint, to add thixotropic body and prevent oil separation.
Hydrogenated Castor Oil does not react with pigments and vehicles and does not detract from the durability of paint. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil assists in the stabilization of water-in-oil emulsions. 
Add 1–2% of total pigment weight.

Castor wax is primarily used as a rheological additive to add thixotropic body and increase viscosity, reduce settling of pigments and extenders, control sag without impairing flow to produce optimum leveling in paints, control liquid penetration into porous surfaces and has no adverse effect on durability and lightfastness and is non-yellowing.

Solubility
Castor wax exhibits relatively high solubility in hydrocarbon solvents (such as mineral spirits). It is insoluble in water and alcohol, but is readily soluble in benzene and common organic non-polar solvents when warm.

Storage
Castor wax should be kept in a cool, dry location. It has a shelf life of four years from date of manufacture.

How to Use
The optimum use level of castor wax varies depending on the vehicle and on the desired degree of thickening. A typical starting use level is 0.2% to 0.8% by weight of the total paint. Castor wax should be added to the vehicle before grinding with the pigment, preferably by mixing in the vehicle for about five minutes before other components are added. When incorporating castor wax a lower and an upper processing temperature must be observed. A minimum temperature of about 43° C (110° F) is necessary to build the thixotropic structure properly. If a 55° C (130° F) temperature is exceeded, soft gel-like particles may appear on return to room temperature. The presence of aromatic solvents lowers this upper temperature limit. Should this limit be exceeded, the formation of particles can be prevented by continuous stirring during cooling to 45° C (113° F) or below. Within the prescribed temperature range, castor wax should be subjected to as much stirring as possible during processing. The more intense the stirring or grinding action, the more pronounced and immediate is the effect.

HCO (chemical name: Hydrogenated Castor Oil), also known as castor wax, is a very common oleochemical product that has many industrial and manufacturing applications. 

What is Hydrogenated Castor Oil? 
HCO is a hard, wax-like substance extracted from castor oil beans. 

There is also a petroleum-based formula of Hydrogenated Caster Oil known as PEG-40. 
The Hydrogenated Castor Oil chemical formula of this material is C57H110O9(CH2CH2O)n. 
Hydrogenation refers to a chemical process where an unsaturated compound is combined with hydrogen to produce saturation. 
In the case of Hydrogenated Castor Oil, this increases the oil’s stability and raises its melting point, transforming it into a solid at room temperature.
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is insoluble in water and most types of organic solvents. 
This makes Hydrogenated Castor Oil extremely valuable in the manufacturing of lubricants and industrial greases. 
However, Hydrogenated Castor Oil is soluble in hot solvents. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil also has the ability to resist water while retaining its polarity, lubricity and surface wetting capabilities. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is also an extremely safe, non-toxic material that is suitable for use in personal care products and soaps. 
To learn more about HCO safety, please review the Hydrogenated Castor Oil SDS (Safety Data Sheet).

Uses
Castor wax is used in polishes, oils paints (Old Holland, Lefranc), cosmetics, electrical capacitors, carbon paper, lubrication and coatings and greases where resistance to moisture, oils and petrochemical products is required. 
Castor wax is also useful in polyurethane coating formulation, as it contains three secondary hydroxyl groups. 
These coating compositions are useful as a top coat varnish for leather, wood and rubber. 
Castor wax can also be added to beeswax for encaustic painting.

Properties
Melting point = 80 C
Acid number = 2
Saponification value = 179
Iodine number = 4


Like pure castor oil, the hydrogenated one is rich in triglycerides from ricinoleic acid. 
Hydrogenated castor oil is used in many products for the following characteristics:

Hydrogenated castor oil is lipogelling
Hydrogenated castor oil helps stabilize the emulsions, thus favouring mixtures of liquids
Hydrogenated castor oil acts as a viscosity control agent
Hydrogenated castor oil is also possible that you will be confronted, in the compositions of your products, with castor oil ethoxylated and/or hydrogenated, or PEG-40 (for example). It is nothing but pure castor oil which has been subjected to chemical treatment with ethylene oxide (ethoxylation), and/or hydrogenation, to make it an emulsifying/surfactant agent whose penetration into the skin is multiplied. However, this process involves very polluting residues.

What are the multiple uses of this oil?

Because of its characteristics, hydrogenated castor oil, or castor wax, is one of the ingredients of many products. It is found in some varnishes, soaps, and in different types of cosmetics. If you look carefully at the ingredients of your beauty products, there is a good chance that you will see the word hydrogenated wherever you read castor oil as it is the safest form. This is also valid in certain products labelled organic.

Additionally, you will also find it in a wide variety of products, which you might not have thought of at first knowing the benefits of castor oil for the body. The fact that it is lipogelling and resistant to water, oil and petrochemical liquids allows it to be commonly found, for example, in the composition of:

coatings, especially polyurethane
engine lubricants
carbon paper
electric capacitors
Paints and varnishes for materials (wood, leather, etc.)
household products
Properties of Castor oil products

Castor oil, hydrogenated


Glyceryl tris(12-hydroxystearate)
139-44-6
Thixin R
Trihydroxystearin
Glycerol tris(12-hydroxystearate)
Thixcin E
Thixcin R
Trixcin R
Tixcin R
12-Hydroxystearic acid triglyceride
2,3-bis(12-hydroxyoctadecanoyloxy)propyl 12-hydroxyoctadecanoate
UNII-06YD7896S3
Tri-12-hydroxystearin
12-Hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, glyceryl ester
Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, triester with glycerol
1,2,3-Propanetriyl tris(12-hydroxyoctadecanoate)
12-Hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, triester with glycerol
NSC2389
06YD7896S3
Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, 1,2,3-propanetriyl ester
Hydrogenated castor oil
Castorwax
Castorwax NF
Rice syn wax
Unitina HR
Castorwax MP-70
Castorwax MP-80
Castor oil hydrogenated
Caswell No. 486A
Olio di ricino idrogenato
UNII-ZF94AP8MEY
Castor oil, hydrogenated [NF]
8001-78-3
NSC 2389
EINECS 205-364-6
EINECS 232-292-2
Olio di ricino idrogenato [Italian]
EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 031604
AI3-19740
ZF94AP8MEY
EC 232-292-2
SCHEMBL296177
DTXSID3051701
Glyceryl tri(12-hydroxystearate)
NSC-2389
Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, 1,1',1''-(1,2,3-propanetriyl) ester
Octadecanoic acid, triester with glycerol
1,2,3-Propanetriol tri(12-hydroxystearate)
FT-0623513
Propane-1,2,3-triyl tris(12-hydroxyoctadecanoate)
W-108215
12-Hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, 1,2,3-propanetriyl ester
Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, 1,2, 3-propanetriyl ester
2,3-Bis((12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl)oxy)propyl 12-hydroxyoctadecanoate


The oil has many properties since it is a multifaceted agent:

It is an emollient that softens and moisturizes the skin
An emulsifier because it promotes the mixing of liquids
Helps in the maintenance of healthy skin
A surfactant since it allows a uniform distribution of the product by reducing the surface tension
Promotes viscosity control
However, hydrogenation is an aggressive process because it involves high-temperature extraction of the oils. This, therefore, has an effect on the quality of the final oil produced. This chemical treatment also leaves doubts about its harmful effects.

Benefits

One of the most popular advantages of hydrogenated castor oil is for hair. 
The oil exhibits remarkable results for the growth of hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes. 
Moreover, it is capable of treating a large number of diseases. 
It is, however, not uncommon to see it in automobile and aviator mechanics. 
It can either be applied by massage or used in plasters or poultices. It can also be used on any part of the body – the belly, the face, the thighs, the hands, hair, and more.

Castor Vegetable Wax Flakes are a derivative of Castor Oil. They are produced by the hydrogenation (chemical combination with hydrogen) of pure castor oil, in the presence of a nickel catalyst.

INCI: Hydrogenated Castor Oil.

Appearance: Solid white flakes with little to no odor.

Uses: Castor Wax is heavily used in the cosmetic industry when a waxy component is needed in a formulation. It also acts as a thickening and moisturizing agent. Examples include eyeliner pencils, anti-antiperspirant sticks, body washes, creams, lotions and lipsticks. Castor wax is also used to make liquid soaps.

Compatibility: Castor Wax is compatible with most animal, vegetable and mineral waxes and a large variety of natural and synthetic resins.


HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is a hard, amorphous, waxy solid, melting at 86° to 88°C, composedprincipally of glyceryl tris-12-hydroxystearate. 
The ordinary commercial product may have a lower melting point because of impurities or because of deliberate incomplete hydrogenation to modify properties. 
The largest use for HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is the manufacture of multipurpose greases. Other uses of HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL are in the formulation of waxes, polishes, cosmetics, and paper coatings. 
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL may be only a minor constituent of the final -product. 

HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is used primarily for the manufacture of heavy-duty lubricants.
Except for the presence of a hydroxyl group on most of the 18-carbon chains,castor oil derivatives are chemically similar to corresponding chain-length compounds made from more ordinary fats and oils. 
The hydroxyl group imparts superior lubricating properties and raises the melting point of the castor oil derivatives by more than 20°C compared with derivatives of ordinary fats and oils, making castor oil derivatives especially suitable for certain heavy-duty lubricants. 
Lubricants for certain types of machinery operated at high speeds or under high pressure must have high melting points as well as the required lubricating properties

Hydrogenated castor oil (castor wax) is also used an extended release agent; stiffening agent; tablet and capsule lubricant.

Hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) is insoluble in water and in most organic solvents but it is soluble in hot organic solvents like ether and chloroform. 
This insolubility is among good qualities that make Hydrogenated castor oil valuable for lubricant industries because of water resistance and retention of its lubricity. 
Moreover, the polarity and surface wetting properties of Hydrogenated castor oil are useful in cosmetics, hair dressing, solid lubricant, paint additives, manufacture of waxes, polishes, carbon paper, candles and crayons

Hydrogenated Castor Oil (HCO) or castor wax is a hard, brittle wax. Hydrogenated Castor Oil is odorless and insoluble in water.

Hydrogenated Castor Oil is produced by addition of hydrogen to castor oil (hydrogenation process) in the presence of a nickel catalyst. 
This is done by bubbling hydrogen gas into the castor oil, during which the Ricinoleic Acid becomes fully saturated to give a viscous waxy like substance with a melting point of 61-69oC. 
Hydrogenation of castor oil accounts for the largest single use of castor oil for a standard commodity. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is insoluble in water and most organic solvents, but it is soluble in hot solvents. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is water resistant while retaining lubricity, polarity and surface wetting properties. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is this insolubility that makes HCO valuable to the lubricants markets. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is perfect for metal drawing lubricants and multipurpose industrial greases. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is used in polishes, cosmetics, electrical capacitors, carbon paper, lubrication, and coatings and greases where resistance to moisture, oils and petrochemical products is required.

Hydrogenated castor oil — also called HCO or castor wax — is a hard, white, opaque vegetable wax. 
Its resistance to moisture makes it useful in many coatings, greases, cosmetics, polishes and similar applications.

The wax is created by hydrogenating pure liquid castor oil, which is obtained from castor beans. 
The oil is heated under extreme pressure using a nickel catalyst during the hydrogenation process. 
Afterward, the hydrogen creates saturated molecules of castor wax, which gives the oil a higher melting point that allows it to remain solid at room temperature. After hydrogenation, the oil becomes hard and brittle to the touch.

HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL USES AND APPLICATIONS

Hydrogenated castor oil flakes are incredibly versatile. 
Their unique structure is useful for applications in many industries. 
Some of the industries that often employ castor wax include:
Skin care: HCO is an ingredient in numerous topical acne treatments and liquid soaps because of its anti-inflammatory qualities. Because it is insoluble in water, you can also add it to various lotions and creams to keep your product from washing off too easily when a user washes their hands. 
Further, antiperspirant manufacturers employ its unique consistency to keep deodorants’ bases firm but easily spreadable on the skin.
Hair care: Likewise, the product is a favorite ingredient in conditioners. It can hydrate and moisturize dry hair due to the triglycerides naturally found in castor oil. It is also an excellent foam booster in shampoos.
Cosmetics: Castor wax is found in nearly any cosmetic product that requires a waxy substance. Common makeup products using the wax include eyeliner pencils, lipsticks and balms.
Plastics: HCO acts as both a release agent and a lubricant for PVC during plastics production and can aid in polyurethane coating production.
Lubricants: Various greases and lubricants use HCO. It makes an excellent thickening agent in products such as lithium grease and greases for multipurpose use.


Hydrogenated castor oil is a chemically modified version of castor oil that results in a solid, waxy material that serves as an emollient and consistency building material.

Hydrogenated castor oil also has some unique moisturizing properties as it is both occlusive and humectant.  
The former one is common for oils and waxes and it means that it sits on top of the skin hindering water to evaporate out of the top layers. 
The latter one, the humectant property, is surprising and comes from the unique property of ricinoleic acid (the dominant fatty acid in castor oil)  having an extra water-loving -OH group on its otherwise oil-loving fatty chain.


HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL
Benefits: HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL acts as an emollient agent, as it is highly moisturising and softening. 
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is remarkable that it is quickly absorbed into the skin and nourishes from the inside so it is especially indicated and beneficial for dry and sensitive skin. 
In addition, HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL also has anti-ageing properties by stimulating collagen and elastin production and, hence, reduces the appearance of expression lines.


1,3-bis[(12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl)oxy]propan-2-yl 12-hydroxyoctadecanoate
2,3-bis(12-hydroxyoctadecanoyloxy)propyl 12-hydroxyoctadecanoate
Castor Oil, hydrogenated
HCO
propane-1,2,3-triyl tris(12-hydroxyoctadecanoate)
Triglyceride ester of 12-hydroxy octadecanoic acid


HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is classified as :
Emollient
Emulsifying
Skin conditioning
Surfactant
Viscosity controlling

CAS Number: 8001-78-3
EINECS/ELINCS No:232-292-2
COSING REF No:    34330
Chem/IUPAC Name: Castor oil, hydrogenated

Production Methods: Hydrogenated castor oil is prepared by the hydrogenation of castor oil using a catalyst.

The hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) is obtained form castor oil hydrogenation process.

It is a solid at room temperature and melts above 85 ° C. It is marketed in the form of flakes or granules, is white and opaque.

CAS Number: 8001-78-3
Inci Name: Hydrogenated Castor Oil
Other Names: HCO

 

Hydrogenated Castor Oil, also known as castor wax, is derived from castor beans (Ricinus communis), which is typically a liquid at room temperature, that has been processed by adding hydrogen to make it more stable and raises its melting point so that it is a solid at room temperature. It is odourless and insoluble in water.

Historically, ancient Egyptians used castor oil as fuel for their lamps. Castor oil has also been used as a lubricant in machine and aircraft engines, and is added to certain paints, dyes and varnishes as well. 
Ingestion of pure castor oil works as a laxative to treat constipation.

What does it do?
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is a hard, waxy substance with a unique structure. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil works with the other oils and waxes in the antiperspirant base to give the stick a firm but spreadable consistency. 
In all cases, because hydrogenated castor oil is insoluble in water, it is not readily washed away.

Hydrogenated castor oil is used in cosmetics, hair dressing, solid lubricant, paint additives, manufacture of waxes, polishes, carbon paper, candles and crayons

HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL     
CASTOR OIL, HYDROGENATED

Product Name: Hydrogenated Castor Oil
Synonyms: Hydrogenated Castor Oil, HCO
CAS No.: 8001-78-3

Use of the substance/mixture: Thickener in lithium grease, emulsion in personal care applications 

Pharmaceutical Applications
Hydrogenated castor oil is a hard wax with a high melting point used in oral and topical pharmaceutical formulations. 
In topical formulations, hydrogenated castor oil is used to provide stiffness to creams and emulsions. 
In oral formulations, hydrogenated castor oil is used to prepare sustained-release tablet and capsule preparations
Hydrogenated castor oil may be used as a coat or to form a solid matrix.
Hydrogenated castor oil is additionally used to lubricate the die walls of tablet presses and is similarly used as a lubricant in food processing.
Hydrogenated castor oil is also used in cosmetics.

 Hydrogenated castor oil is a white and hard wax with a melting point about 85℃.
● It is compatible with ethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate butyrate, natural and synthetic rubber, polyethylene,polyvinyl butyrate, polymethacrylate, rosins, shellacs, botanical wax, and montan wax, etc.
● Hydrogenated castor oil is relatively stable against heat and able to improve resistance against solvent and grease, as well as hardness and melting point of other waxes by blending together
● It can be used in cosmetics, grease, shoe cream, polish, crayons and pharmaceuticals.


Physical State : Solid
Appearance : Flakes. White powder.
Odor : Hardened vegetable oil.
Odor Threshold : No data available
pH : No data available
Relative Evaporation Rate (butylacetate=1) : No data available
Melting Point : 82 - 87 °C (179.6-188.6°F)
Freezing Point : No data available
Boiling Point : > 300 °C (572°F)
Flash Point : > 310 °C (590°F)
Auto-ignition Temperature : No data available
Decomposition Temperature : No data available
Flammability (solid, gas) : No data available
Vapor Pressure : 3.81E-34 Pa at 20 °C.
Relative Vapor Density at 20 °C : No data available
Relative Density : ~ 99 @ 25 °C
Specific Gravity : 0.93 g/cm³ @25°C

Solubility : Water: < 0.05 mg/l @20°C
Ether: Soluble
Organic solvent:Soluble

Uses    
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is used in multipurpose greases having higher dropping points for hardness, better rust-proofing, lubricity and durability 
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is used in metal drawing lubes, PVC lubricants for PVC pipes, profiles, sheets, pharma tabletting, metal powders, ceramics.
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is used in cosmetics in lipsticks, deodorant and antiperspirant sticks and cosmetic creams.
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is slip additive in inks, paints, plastics (PE).
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is dispersing agent in plastic colour master batches, carbon papers, inks.
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is flow control and dispersing additive in powder coatings, hot-melt adhesives and sealants.
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL is used in shoe polishing and furniture polishing creams.


HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL Chemical Properties
Solubility :Practically insoluble in water; soluble in acetone, chloroform, and methylene chloride.
Stability: Stable. Combustible. Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents.

HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL Usage And Synthesis
Description: Hydrogenated castor oil is a waxy compound obtained by the hydrogenation of refined castor oil. 
Hydrogenated castor oil is a hard product with a high melting point. 
Hydrogenated castor oil is almost odourless and tasteless. 
HCO is supplied in flakes and powder. 
Hydrogenated castor oil is cream to white coloured.
appearance white to creamish flakes or powder
melting point °C: 83 - 87
colour Gardner max. 3
colour (on 1” Lovibond) max 20 yellow / max.2 red
acid value mg KOH/g max. 5
iodine value g/100g max. 5
hydroxyl value 155 - 165
saponification value mg KOH/g 180 - 190


Chemical Properties: Hydrogenated castor oil occurs as a fine, almost white or pale yellow powder or flakes. The PhEur 6.0 describes hydrogenated castor oil as the oil obtained by hydrogenation of virgin castor oil. 
It consists mainly of the triglyceride of 12-hydroxystearic acid.

Hydrogenated castor oil is a white waxy solid derived from the castor bean (Ricinus communis) a fast growing species of flowering shrub. 
Likely a native to North-East Africa but now found around the world, these trees grow up to 4 meters tall with large, soft leaves and clusters of flowers containing rectangular seeds. 
The seeds, known as castor 'beans' are particularly rich in triglycerides, useful fatty acids also present in the body. 
To produce castor oil, harvested seeds undergo a process of drying, dehulling, heating and pressing to extract the oil. 
The raw seeds are highly poisonous due to the presence of ricin; the crucial heating process during oil production disables the ricin rendering the oil safe for use.

Using hydrogen gas, a catalyst such as nickel, and high pressure, plant oils can undergo a hydrogenation process whereby they change from a liquid into a solid or semi-solid state - becoming hydrogenated oils. 
The hydrogenation process allows oils to remain solid at room temperature - an everyday example of which is margarine. 
When used in skincare, hydrogenated castor oil's resistance to water and oil can help the skin retain moisture, leaving it soft and smooth.

Other names: Castor Wax, Glyceryl tris(12-hydroxystearate), Trihydroxystearin; Castor Oil, Hydrogenated

INCI Name:
Hydrogenated Castor Oil
Ingredient origins:
Castor Seed
Role:
Skin Conditioning Agent
Common name:
Hydrogenated Castor Oil


Manufacturing processes
Hydrogenated castor oil is derived from castor oil, more or less by definition. 
Castor oil is approximately 97 percent triglycerides, an unusually high proportion, with a fatty acid composition comprising 85 to 90 percent of a single fatty acid, cis-12-hydroxyoctadecen-9-oic acid, more conunonly known as ricinoleic acid.
Castor oil is the starting point in making a number of organic chemicals by processes of hydrogenation, hydrolysis, dehydration, sulfonation, alkali fusion, oxidation, and so forth. 
Besides use as a starting material for synthesis, castor oil is used directly in coatings and finishes and other products; small amounts are used for medicinal cathartics.

The manufacture of Hydrogenated castor oil is a minor use of castor oil and relatively minor among the chemical derivatives of castor oil. 
More important is dehydration (catalytic removal of the hydroxyl group and a nearby hydrogen atom) to form a doubly unsaturated carbon chain. 
Dehydrated castor oil is an excellent,though expensive, nonyellowing drying oil in coatings, with good film-forming properties and possessing high flexibility and adhesion. 
Besides direct use in protective coatings, dehydrated castor oil is hydrolyzed to mixed fatty acids, which are also made by dehydration of ricinoleic acid derived by hydrolysis from castor oil. 
Such dehydrated castor oil fatty acids have a much higher content of conjugated fatty acids, a desirable attribute in many applications. 
Sulfonation of castor oil produces Turkey red oil, long used as a textile dyeing assist
The processing of castor oil through a number of steps, including alkali fusion, produces sebacic acid, which is, among other things, a precursor of nylon-6,10, a superior molding plastic to the more conunon nylon-6,6 derived from adipic acid. 
Nylon-11, superior for some engineering and industrial textile applications, is made from castor oil by a transesterification reaction.

Proper care must certainly be taken with all of these processes, but none is regarded as "high-tech" by chemical industry standards.

Hydrogenated castor oil has been subjected to hydrogenation. 
Hydrogenation and hydrolysis are employed in making other castor oil products not subject to the present investigation. 
Hydrogenation and hydrolysis are applied on a very large scale worldwide in the processing of fats and oils generally into corranon end products. 

Castor Oil is heated to reduce viscosity and reaction time and is reacted with hydrogen gas in a closed pressure vessel at several hundred pounds per square inch pressure in the presence of a nickel or other metallic catalyst. 
Hydrolysis (also known as fat splitting or saponHication) is done by heating oil and water in the presence of either an acidic or basic catalyst. 


Castor Wax is heavily used in the cosmetic industry when a waxy component is needed in a formulation. It also acts as a thickening and moisturizing agent. Examples include eyeliner pencils, anti-antiperspirant sticks, body washes, creams, lotions and lipsticks. Castor wax is also used to make liquid soaps.


Reactivity: Stable at ambient temperature and under normal conditions of use
Chemical Stability: Risk of explosion by shock, friction, fire or other sources of ignition. Risk of explosion if heated under confinement.
Possibility of Hazardous Reactions: Hazardous polymerization will not occur.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid creating or spreading dust. Avoid ignition sources.
Incompatible Materials: Strong acids. Strong bases. Strong oxidizers.
Hazardous Decomposition Products: Carbon oxides (CO, CO2).

Kolliwax HCO 

Kolliwax HCO is hydrogenated castor powder for pharmaceutical application used as consistency factor in topical formulations, as lipohphillic lubricant in tablets and capsules and as plasticizer in solid dispersions using spray drying, melt granulation or hot melt extrusion processes. 
Kolliwax HCO is particularily suitable for formulation of sensitive APIs.

Kolliwax HCO hydrogenated castor oil complies with IPEC GMP standards for critical pharmaceutical applications. 
It is used as a consistency factor in topical formulations, as alipophillic lubricant in tablets and capsules, and as a plasticizer in solid dispersions using spray drying, melt granulation or hot melt extrusion processes. 
It ensures risk reduction in pharmaceutical applications and meets all relevant regulatory needs. 
Kolliwax HCO commercial packaging includes a transport friendly and secure box with primary electrostatically dissipative PE packaging material.

Why choose Kolliwax HCO?
IPEC GMP compliant and Secure Lined Box Packaging
Unique particle size distribution
Is particularly suitable for the formulation of sensitive APIs
Compatible with several natural vegetable and animal waxes, as well as fatty alcohols to enhance viscosity of topical formulations
Suitable as a plasticizer for melt granulation, spray drying, hot melt extrusion
Compatible with several APIs, no metallic taste, effective lubricant


In topical formulations, Kolliwax HCO can be used as consistency factor to enhance the viscosity of the formulation. The typical concentration at about 0.1-2% hydrogenated castor oil is compatible with most natural vegetable and animal waxes and can therefore be used in combination with fatty alcohols and other consistency factors.

Similar to emollients, waxes affect the sensory profile and the stability of a topical formulation. They are solid at ambient temperatures and stabilize emulsions as the viscosity is increased by formation of lamellar structures in oil-in-water formulations.

Furthermore Kolliwax HCO has a special advantage because of its high melting point and is able to support the formulation stability particularly at elevated temperatures.

Lubricants prevent ingredients from clumping together and from sticking to the tablet punches or capsule filling machine. Lubricants also ensure that tablet formulations and ejection can occur with low friction. Common minerals like talc or silica, and fats, e.g. vegetable stearin, magnesium stearate or stearic acid, are most frequently used lubricants in tablets or hard gelatin capsules. Lubricants are added in small quantities to tablet or capsule formulations to improve certain processing characteristics.

In tablet formulations Kolliwax HCO can be used as a lubricant as an effective alternative to magnesium stearate. Hydrogenated castor oil is compatible to a large number of actives and does not provide a metallic taste. Kolliwax HCO is particularly suitable for formulation of sensitive APIs.


In solid dispersions, Kolliwax HCO is used as plasticizer in solid polymeric matrices. It is suitable for melt granulation, spray drying and hot melt extrusion processes.

Safety    Hydrogenated castor oil is used in oral and topical pharmaceutical formulations and is generally regarded as an essentially nontoxic and nonirritant material.
Acute oral toxicity studies in animals have shown that hydrogenated castor oil is a relatively nontoxic material. Irritation tests with rabbits show that hydrogenated castor oil causes mild, transient irritation to the eye.

Hydrogenated Castor Oil

Castor Wax: What is it?

Castor wax or hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) is a derivative of castor beans (Ricinus communis), which is typically present in the form of a liquid at room temperature. One can find the vegetable wax in its unmodified state in the form of hard crumbly block. It works well with other oils and waxes in the antiperspirant base, giving the stick a firm, yet spreadable consistency.

Properties of Castor Wax

Castor wax, a cream to white coloured, is flaky or powdered in nature. It is odourless and insoluble in water; hence, it does not wash away easily. It has a density of 0.970 at 20⁰C, with melting point at 83-87⁰C. Like pure castor oil, castor wax is rich in triglycerides received from ricinoleic acid and highly used in several products for its unique properties.

Castor wax has lipo gelling properties, which means it helps in reduction of fat and cellulite from the body, especially in arms, legs and abdominal region. Besides, it helps in stabilizing the emulsions, thereby favouring mixtures of liquids. Lastly, it acts as a viscosity-controlling agent.

Making of Castor Wax

The castor oil manufacturers produce castor wax or hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) following a process called hydrogenation. The process involves chemical combination of elemental hydrogen and hence the name hydrogen castor oil. In the presence of nickel catalyst, pure castor oil gets hydrogenated, which increases the melting point of the final product. During the process of manufacturing castor wax, the manufacturers bubbles hydrogen gas into castor oil. The process improves the taste, odour and other qualities of the final product. Besides, the process gives a viscous waxy consistency, which is none other than castor wax. However, for obtaining best results, the process requires high concentration of nickel.

Reasons of Using Castor Wax as a Natural Ingredient in Skincare Products

Since ancient times, people consider castor oil as a natural remedy for treating several skin and hair problems. It is the best elixir that keeps your lustrous skin glowing. Castor oil, enriched with omega fatty acids, proteins and castor oil helps in preventing hair fall, premature greying of hair, promoting hair growth and battle with irritated scalp. Whether you have tan, acne, pigmentation, or even aging signs, castor oil is the best natural ingredient having all the solutions. Castor wax, one of the castor oil derivatives, contains similar properties of castor oil; hence, used in several natural skincare products.

Below are the reasons for using hydrogenated castor oil in different skincare products.

Reduces Wrinkles

Castor oil is the best solution for reducing wrinkles. When applied, the oil defuses on the skin, thereby stimulating production of collagen, which smoothens and hydrates the skin. Apply castor oil or products containing castor wax on the wrinkles. Let it stay overnight and rinse well. Castor oil helps in revamping the skin, making it look supple and radiant.

Cleansing Agent

Castor oil has natural astringent properties that help in clearing the impurities from the skin. Besides, you can use castor oil as a cleansing agent or for cleansing your oily skin. With the richness of fatty acids, castor oil facilitates restoring moisture balance to your skin. Application of castor oil or products containing castor oil derivatives helps in clearing the clogged pores and healing acne.

Moisturising Agent

The anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of castor oil assists in healing several skin ailments. It shields you skin from bacterial infections and prevents microbes causing skin problems. Besides, castor oil is rich in triglycerides, which is beneficial for maintaining the moisture content of your skin. Pure castor oil along with products containing castor wax are best for treating dry skin. Moreover, the humectant properties help in retaining moisture by preventing water loss and keep your skin hydrated throughout the day.

Helps in Maintaining Complexion

With high saturation of mono-saturated fatty acids in castor oil, makes your skin soft and smooth. It also stimulates the growth of healthy skin tissues, improves your uneven skin tone, skin texture and complexion. With a lower comedogenic score, castor oil prevents the growth and appearance of blackheads and clogged pores on your skin. Hence, it is the best suitable natural ingredients for all skin types, especially for sensitive skin.

Reduces Fungal Infections

People often face fungal infections caused due to candida albicans, which cause common dental problems such as formation and growth of plaque, root canal infections and gum infections. The strong antifungal properties of castor oil facilitate in warding off bacteria and maintain the freshness and health of the mouth. You can also treat denture associated with stomatitis, a painful condition caused by candida albicans from the infected tooth.

Other Uses of Castor wax

Castor wax has uses in different industries. Besides it’s usage in different products in skincare industries, one can find hydrogenated castor oil used in polishes, oil paints, electrical capacitors, lubricants, carbon paper, coatings and greases, which requires resistance to oils, moisture and petrochemical products. Polyurethane coating formulation also contains castor wax, containing three secondary hydroxyl groups. The coating compositions forms a topcoat varnish for lather and leather products, wood and rubber. In manufacturing encaustic painting, the manufacturers use castor wax in combination with beeswax.

Besides, different types of detergents and emulsifiers, liquid soaps, and formed plastics contain castor wax. With the power of resisting moisture, oils and varied petrochemical products, manufacturers use castor wax or hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) in manufacturing different types of cosmetic products such as deodorants, creams, lotions and foundations.

Castor wax is a derivative of castor oil, produced by bubbling of hydrogen gas in the presence of high concentration of nickel has become one of the most essential ingredients in the skincare industry. With several benefits for the skin, hair, nails and overall wellbeing, yet you must not abuse and avoid excess usage.


This vegetable wax comes in a white flake form and has a melting point of 85-88 degrees Celsius. Castor wax flakes can be heated beyond this range to create a liquid and the material will re-harden once the temperature cools. Castor wax flakes are produced through the chemical combination of hydrogen and pure castor oil. It is an odorless wax-like substance that is insoluble in water.

Castor wax flakes are used in a variety of cosmetic and industrial applications. They can be used effectively as a thickening agent for lotions and creams and are commonly found in a wide range of cosmetic products such as lip balms, body creams, hair care products, eye makeup and face foundations. Industrial applications include polished coatings, lubricants and auto maintenance products


Castor Wax is a vegetable-derived (vegan), hydrogenated castor oil derivative, that can be used as an emollient and thickener in a variety of cosmetic products. 
Supplied as an off-white hard brittle wax ( flakes /pastilles ). 
Castor Wax  is a non-toxic, odourless, tasteless,  biodegradable and a renewable resource product. 
It contains a high proportion of Ricinoleic Acid (12-Hydroxyoleic Acid).  
Castor Wax has high product uniformity and consistency for a naturally occurring material.  
Castor Wax acts as a moisturiser due to being a humectant (via hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl groups on the product and water molecules) and also by being able to form an occlusive layer which reduces trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). 
It is recommended for use in anti-perspirant sticks, cosmetic pencils, lipsticks, creams and lotions. 
Castor wax is noted for its ability to carry a high concentration of dyes and pigments, which is a requirement of colour cosmetics such as lipsticks.


Castor Wax acts as a substantivity agent, thickener & stabilizer, waxes/consistency factor and protective agent. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is obtained by hydrogenation of virgin castor oil. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil consists mainly of glycerides of 12-hydroxystearic acid. 

Castor Wax is a white, hard and high melting wax. 
Castor Wax is used a binder and viscosity enhancer for emulsions, pastes and anhydrous systems. 
Castor Wax is non-animal, offers hold and protection. 
Due to its excellent pigment dispersing properties Castor Wax is often used in sticks especially antiperspirants and pencil preparations. 
Other applications include decorative cosmetics and hair styling products.It is 100% natural.


Castor Wax is used to thicken emulsions, bind antiperspirants and can work to disperse pigments
Castor Wax is a castor oil derivative. Hydrogenated Castor Oil is used as an emollient and thickening agent in ointments and deodorants. 
Because of the meltpoints of either 70 or 80, Castor Wax is often preferred over standard HCO for Personal Care applications, as well as in Textile processing.
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is used to thicken emulsions, bind antiperspirants and can work to disperse pigments. 
Hydrogenated Castor Oil is widely used in lip balms, anhydrous systems and color cosmetics.


Benefits:
Hydrogenated Castor Oil increases viscosity in lotions, creams, and ointments
Hydrogenated Castor Oil stabilizes stick products and increases melting point of lip sticks and lip balms
Hydrogenated Castor Oil acts as effective emollient
Use: For external use only,  Add to hot oil phase of formulation until melted (melting point 84-89°C / 183-192°F). Typical use level 0.5-10%. 
 
Applications: Stick products, also deodorants, lip balms, pomades, foundations, creams, lotions.


Hydrogenated Castor Oil ( Castor Wax ) as Rheological additive

Castorwax is hard and brittle, and has a high melting point. It is practically odorless (faint fatty or waxy odor) and is tasteless. 
It can be supplied in the form of uniform, free-flowing, white flakes. 
The color of solid castorwax is cream to pearly by reflected light and bluish-white by natural light. 
When molten it is clear, transparent, very fluid, and largely colorless.
Solid castorwax has an amorphous fracture. It is normally uniform in composition and free from extraneous matter.
Castorwax is relatively non-toxic; it can be considered as having a toxicity on the order of linseed or vegetable oils. 
Castorwax is extremely hard in comparison with most other waxes. 
Its penetration value (Penetrometer Needle No. 14 with 100 grams weight) is 0.2 mm as compared with a value of 0.1 for carnauba wax and 1.7 for beeswax.
Castorwax is highly miscible with abietyl alcohol, hydro-abietyl alcohols, chlorinated aromatics, ethyl cellulose, rosin, cellulose acetate butyrate, and polybutyl and polyisobutyl methacrylates. 
It is moderately miscible with ester gums and coumarone indene resins.
A notable property of castorwax is its relative insolubility in most liquid organic systems at moderate temperatures. 
Castorwax will dissolve in a number of solvents and oils at elevated temperatures with these solutions on cooling forming gels or paste-like masses.
When castorwax is subjected to elevated temperatures for sustained periods of time it undergoes heat deterioration, so that on cooling, the original wax is found degraded to a stiff paste and eventually, on reheating, to a brown grease.
In addition to fully hydrogenated or regular castorwax, there are also available a series of partially hydrogenated castor oils of intermediate melting points which are wax-like. 
These waxes of lower melting point may differ in composition from regular castorwax by containing lower percentages of glyceryl trihydroxystearate. 
As the content of this saturated fatty acid glyceride is reduced, there is a corresponding lowering of the melting point of the product.
Partially hydrogenated castor waxes are slightly more compatible and soluble than fully hydrogenated castorwax. 
They have utility in those applications where some sacrifice in melting point and hardness can be tolerated to achieve better compatibility and solubility, or where a lower melting point is desired.
Seeding problems have plagued systems using theological additives comprised of castorwax from the very beginning and scientists and technicians have long searched without success for a seed resistant castor product to use as a rheological additive. 
Seeding occurs because of the forming of colloidal particles in paint containing castor wax products. 
These colloidal particles result from either solvent-swollen but not properly dispersed grains of castor wax (caused by low heat of activation) or by the precipitation of dissolved wax (caused by overheating). 
Paint left standing often shows both an increase in the number of such particles and an increase in their size. 
Paint also may demonstrate such seeding immediately after manufacture.
Seeding is undesirable because such large particles present unpleasant visual qualities after paint and coatings have been applied to a surface. 
In addition their existance make such application more difficult and time consuming. 


astor Wax Flakes
Castor Wax also called Hydrogenated castor oil or HCO. The reason why it is called a wax is because the oil turns into hard, brittle and insoluble material that surprisingly has a lot of benefits in the manufacture of different kinds of products.

How Hydrogenated Castor Oil Is Made
First of all, the castor oil is extracted from castor beans. Once the pure castor oil is obtained, hydrogen is added to it in the presence of a nickel catalyst. Because of the exposure to hydrogen, the castor oil becomes highly viscous and gives it a wax-like consistency. In a more detailed sense, the hydrogenation of the oil is done by bubbling hydrogen gas through the oil. This process is also used in fats and oils used in cooking and processed goods. By bubbling the hydrogen through the oil, it slowly becomes thick and opaque. Contrary to castor oil which has a faint odor, the wax is odorless and the process of hydrogenation also works to increase its shelf life.

Hydrogenated Castor Oil Temperature Properties
The castor wax has a melting point of 61 – 69 degrees Centigrade which is moderately less than the boiling point. Heating the oil beyond these temperatures can cause the castor wax to melt and become liquid again. Once the temperature cools, it will re-harden.

Hydrogenated Castor Oil Cosmetic Uses
This type of castor oil is most commonly used in cosmetics. It is considered to be an organic ingredient since the hydrogenation process makes use of natural hydrogen gas that is mixed with naturally occurring castor beans.  This type of castor oil is already approved by the Food and Drug Association, and it has also been assessed by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel. It is said certain concentrations are safe to use on the skin.

Castor wax are commonly used in cosmetics because of their ability to help form emulsions by reducing surface tension of the substances that are to be emulsified. They also help other ingredients dissolve in solvents where they would otherwise not normally dissolve. In the cosmetic world, hydrogenated oils have their role in the production of acne products, deodorant sticks, anti-dandruff shampoos and other types of skin care products.

Other Uses of Castor Wax
There are many other uses of the castor wax for common everyday things. The wax is used in the manufacture of candles, polishes, crayons, grease, electrical capacitors, carbon papers, rubbers, lubricants, sealants, and waxes. It is even safe to use as the paper for food packaging. Because of its highly viscous nature, the oil can be utilized for paints and varnishes.

Castor oil has always been known for its various medical benefits. But apparently, aside from all that, the oil can even be converted into hydrogenated castor oil, a versatile and durable wax that has countless contributions to the production of materials ranging from paper to rubber.


Castor Wax Flakes act as an effective emollient while increasing the viscosity in products such as creams and lotions
Castor Wax Flakes act as a thickening and moisturizing agent in various cosmetic applications
This Product Can Be Used in a Wide Variety formulations including:

Body Creams
Lotions
Lip Balm
Lipstick
Hair Care Products
Body Wash
Liquid Soap
Eye Makeup
Face Foundations


 


 

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