LAUROSTEARIC ACID

Laurostearic acid = Dodecanoic acid

CAS number: 143-07-7
EC number: 205-582-1
Molecular formula: C12H24O2

Laurostearic acid or systematically, dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus having many properties of medium-chain fatty acids, is a bright white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap. 
The salts and esters of Laurostearic acid are known as laureates. 
Laurostearic acid is found in many vegetable fats, particularly in coconut and palm kernel oils. 
People use Laurostearic acid as medicine.

Laurostearic acid, also known as dodecanoate or Dodecanoic Acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. 
These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 
Laurostearic acid is a very hydrophobic molecule, practically insoluble (in water), and relatively neutral. 
Laurostearic acid is a potentially toxic compound.

Laurostearic acid, C12H24O2, also known as dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain. 
The powdery, white crystalline acid has a slight odor of oil of bay and occurs naturally in various plant and animal fats and oils. 
Laurostearic acid is a major component of coconut oil and palm kernel oil. 
Laurostearic acid is used as an intermediate and surface active agent in industry and in the manufacture of personal care products in the consumer market

Laurostearic acid (dodecanoic acid, N-Dodecanoic acid, Dodecyl acid) is a saturated medium-chain fatty acid with a 12-carbon backbone. 
Laurostearic acid is found naturally in various plant and animal fats and oils, and is a major component of coconut oil and palm kernel oil.

Laurostearic acid is an inexpensive, non-toxic and safe to handle compound often used in laboratory investigations of melting-point depression. 
Laurostearic acid is a solid at room temperature but melts easily in boiling water, so liquid Laurostearic acid can be treated with various solutes and used to determine their molecular masses.

Glycerides of Laurostearic acid are produced by an esterification reaction between Dodecanoic Acid and glycerol creating a covalent bond between these two molecules. 
They show to possess strong antibacterial properties, especially against Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. 
Laurostearic acid glycerides interfere with the cell membrane and disturbs vital cell processes of the bacteria.

Laurostearic acid or systematically, dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus having many properties of medium-chain fatty acids, is a bright white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap. 
The salts and esters of Laurostearic acid are known as laurates.

Occurrence of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid, as a component of triglycerides, comprises about half of the fatty-acid content in coconut milk, coconut oil, laurel oil, and palm kernel oil (not to be confused with palm oil), Otherwise, it is relatively uncommon. 
Laurostearic acid is also found in human breast milk (6.2% of total fat), cow's milk (2.9%), and goat's milk (3.1%).

Like many other fatty acids, Laurostearic acid is inexpensive, has a long shelf-life, is nontoxic, and is safe to handle. 
Laurostearic acid is used mainly for the production of soaps and cosmetics. 
For these purposes, Laurostearic acid is reacted with sodium hydroxide to give sodium laurate, which is a soap. 
Most commonly, sodium laurate is obtained by saponification of various oils, such as coconut oil. 
These precursors give mixtures of sodium laurate and other soaps.

Laboratory uses of Laurostearic acid:
In the laboratory, Laurostearic acid may be used to investigate the molar mass of an unknown substance via the freezing-point depression. 
The choice of Laurostearic acid is convenient because the melting point of the pure compound is relatively high (43.8°C). 
Its cryoscopic constant is 3.9°C·kg/mol. 
By melting Laurostearic acid with the unknown substance, allowing it to cool, and recording the temperature at which the mixture freezes, the molar mass of the unknown compound may be determined.

Potential medicinal properties of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid increases total serum cholesterol more than many other fatty acids, but mostly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (the "good" blood cholesterol). 
As a result, Laurostearic acid has been characterized as having "a more favorable effect on total HDL cholesterol than any other fatty acid [examined], either saturated or unsaturated".

In general, a lower total/HDL serum cholesterol ratio correlates with a decrease in atherosclerotic risk.
Nonetheless, an extensive meta-analysis on foods affecting the total LDL/serum cholesterol ratio found in 2003 that the net effects of Laurostearic acid on coronary artery disease outcomes remained uncertain.
A 2016 review of coconut oil (which is nearly half Laurostearic acid) was similarly inconclusive about the effects on cardiovascular disease risk.

What Is Laurostearic acid?    
Laurostearic acid is a medium-length long-chain fatty acid, or lipid, that makes up about half of the fatty acids within coconut oil. 

Laurostearic acid’s a powerful substance that is sometimes extracted from the coconut for use in developing monolaurin.
Monolaurin is an antimicrobial agent that is able to fight bacteria, viruses, yeasts, and other pathogens. 
Because you can’t ingest Laurostearic acid alone (it’s irritating and not found alone in nature), you’re most likely to get it in the form of coconut oil or from fresh coconuts.

Though coconut oil is being studied at a breakneck pace, much of the research doesn’t pinpoint what in the oil is responsible for its reported benefits. 
Because coconut oil contains much more than just Laurostearic acid, it would be a stretch to credit it with all of the coconut oil benefits. 
Still, a 2015 analysis suggests that many of the benefits tied to coconut oil are directly linked to Dodecanoic Acid. 
Among the benefits, they suggest Laurostearic acid could aid weight loss and even protect against Alzheimer’s disease. 

Laurostearic acids effects on blood cholesterol levels still need to be clarified.
This research suggests that the benefits of Laurostearic acid are due to how the body uses it. 
The majority of Laurostearic acid is sent directly to the liver, where it’s converted to energy rather than stored as fat. 
When compared with other saturated fats, Laurostearic acid contributes the least to fat storage.

Including Laurostearic acid in Your Diet: 
Laurostearic acid can be taken as a supplement, but it is most commonly consumed as part of coconut oil or palm kernel oil. 
Laurostearic acid is considered to be safe based on the amounts generally found in food. 

However, because they are still pure oil, limit your intake of MCTs to stay within the recommended 5 to 7 teaspoons of oil per day as set out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 
You can use coconut and palm kernel oil for stir-fries because both oils withstand high heat. 
They can also be used in baking, adding a natural richness to your food.

Chemical properties of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is colorless needle-like crystals. 
Laurostearic acid is soluble in methanol, slightly soluble in acetone and petroleum ether.

Uses of Laurostearic acid:
1. Laurostearic acid Used for the preparation of alkyd resins, as well as wetting agents, detergents and pesticides
2. Laurostearic acid is used for peeling vegetables and fruits with a maximum amount of 3.0g/kg.
3. Laurostearic acid is used as defoamer; GB 2760-86 provides for the spices allowed to use; used for the preparation of other food grade additives.
4. Laurostearic acid is widely used in the surfactant industry and can be, according to the classification of surfactants, divided into cationic, anionic, non-ionic and amphoteric type. 

The surfactants types of Laurostearic acid are listed in the attached table of this item. 
Some surfactants of the derivatives of dodecanoic acid and dodecanol are also antiseptics, such as dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (geramine), dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium bromide (bromo-geramine) and dodecyl dimethyl (2-phenoxyethyl) ammonium bromide (domiphen bromide). 
The dodecyldimethyllammonium-2,4,5-trichlorophenolate in these derivatives can be used as citrus preservative. 
Laurostearic acid also has many applications in plastic additives, food additives, spices and pharmaceutical industries.

Intermediates of Liquid Crystals:
Given Laurostearic acids foaming properties, the derivatives of Laurostearic acid (h-dodecanoic acid) are widely used as a base in the manufacture of soaps, detergents, and lauryl alcohol. 
Laurostearic acid is a common constituent of vegetable fats, especially coconut oil and laurel oil. 
Laurostearic acid may have a synergistic effect in a formula to help fight against mircoorganisms. 
Laurostearic acid is a mild irritant but not a sensitizer, and some sources cite it as comedogenic.

Laurostearic acid is a fatty acid obtained from coconut oil and other veg- etable fats. 
Laurostearic acid is practically insoluble in water but is soluble in alco- hol, chloroform, and ether. 
Laurostearic acid functions as a lubricant, binder, and defoaming agent.

Production methods of Laurostearic acid:    
-Industrial production methods of Laurostearic acid can be grouped into two categories: 
    1) derived from the saponification or high temperature and pressure decomposition of natural vegetable oils and fats; 
    2) separated from the synthetic fatty acid. Japan mainly uses coconut oil and palm kernel oil as the raw materials for the preparation of Dodecanoic Acid. 

The natural vegetable oils used to produce dodecanoic acid include coconut oil, litsea cubeba kernel oil, palm kernel oil and mountain pepper seed oil. 
Other plants oil, such as palm kernel oil, tea tree seed oil and camphor tree seed oil, can also service industry to produce dodecanoic acid. 
The residual C12 distillate from the extraction of dodecanoic acid, containing a large number of dodecenoic acid, can be hydrogenated at atmospheric pressure, without catalyst, to convert into dodecanoic acid with a yield of more than 86%.

-Laurostearic acid derived from the separation and purification of coconut oil and other vegetable oil.

-Laurostearic acid naturally exists in coconut oil, litsea cubeba kernel oil, palm kernel oil and pepper kernel oil in the form of glyceride. 
Laurostearic acid can be derived from the hydrolysis of natural oils and fats in industry. 
The coconut oil, water and catalyst are added into the autoclave and hydrolyzed to glycerol and fatty acid at 250 ℃ under the pressure of 5MPa. 

The content of Laurostearic acid is 45%~80%, and can be further distilled to obtain dodecanoic acid.
Laurostearic acid is a fatty carboxylic acid isolated from vegetable and animal fats or oils. 
For example, coconut oil and palm kernel oil both contain high proportions of Laurostearic acid. 
Isolation from natural fats and oils involves hydrolysis, separation of the fatty acids, hydrogenation to convert unsaturated fatty acids to saturated acids, and finally distillation of the specific fatty acid of interest.

Description of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid ( systematically: dodecanoic acid ), the saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus falling into the medium chain fatty acids, is a white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap.

Chemical Properties of Laurostearic acid:    
Like many other fatty acids, Laurostearic acid is inexpensive, has a long shelf-life, and is non-toxic and safe to handle. 
Laurostearic acid is mainly used for the production of soaps and cosmetics. 
For these purposes, Laurostearic acid is neutralized with sodium hydroxide to give sodium laurate, which is a soap. 

Most commonly, sodium laurate is obtained by saponification of various oils, such as coconut oil. 
These precursors give mixtures of sodium laurate and other soaps.
Laurostearic acid occurs as a white crystalline powder with a slight odor of bay oil.

Chemical Properties of Laurostearic acid:   
-Laurostearic acid is a white solid with a faint odour of bay oil
-Laurostearic acid has a fatty odor.
-Laurostearic acid is a common constituent of most diets; large doses may produce gastrointestinal upset

Occurrence of Laurostearic acid:   
Laurostearic acid, as a component of triglycerides, comprises about half of the fatty acid content in coconut oil, laurel oil, and in palm kernel oil (not to be confused with palm oil), Otherwise it is relatively uncommon. 
Laurostearic acid is also found in human breast milk ( 6.2 % of total fat), cow's milk (2.9%), and goat's milk (3.1 %).

Pharmaceutical Applications of Laurostearic acid:    
Laurostearic acid has also been examined for use as an enhancer for topical penetration and transdermal absorption, rectal absorption, buccal delivery, and intestinal absorption. 
Laurostearic acid is also useful for stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions. 
Laurostearic acid has also been evaluated for use in aerosol formulations.

CAS Number: 143-07-7  
CHEBI:30805 
ChEMBL: ChEMBL108766 
ChemSpider: 3756  
ECHA InfoCard: 100.005.075  
EC Number: 205-582-1
IUPHAR/BPS: 5534
KEGG: C02679  
PubChem CID: 3893
UNII: 1160N9NU9U 
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID5021590

Storage of Laurostearic acid: 
Laurostearic acid is stable at normal temperatures and should be stored in a cool, dry place. 
Avoid sources of ignition and contact with incompatible materials.

Laurostearic acid is a naturally occurring compound found in a variety of animal and vegetable fats and oils, particularly coconut oil and palm kernel oil. 
Laurostearic acid is carried to the whole body by lymphatic portal systems.
Laurostearic acid or systematically, dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus having many properties of medium-chain fatty acids, is a bright white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap. 
The salts and esters of Laurostearic acid are known as laureates a fatty acid, CH3(CH2)10COOH, occurring in coconut, palm and laurel oil; mostly used in making cosmetics and soaps dodecanoic acid, fatty crystalline acid that is mostly found in coconut and laurel oil (used to make soaps, cosmetic products, etc.) a crystalline fatty acid occurring as glycerides in natural fats and oils (especially coconut oil and palm-kernel oil)

Industry Uses of Laurostearic acid:      
-Commercial and industrial products.
-Dyes
-İntermediates

Consumer Uses of Laurostearic acid:        
-Cleaning and furnishing care products
-Cleaning compound
-Floor coverings
-Industrial organic chemicals used in commercial and consumer products.
-Lubricants and greases
-Personal care products

Industry Processing Sectors:
-All other basic organic chemical manufacturing
-All other chemical product and preparation manufacturing
-Petroleum lubricating oil and grease manufacturing
-Plastic material and resin manufacturing
-Soap, cleaning compound, and toilet preparation manufacturing
-Synthetic dye and pigment manufacturing
-Textiles, apparel, and leather manufacturing

About Laurostearic acid Helpful information:
Laurostearic acid is registered under the REACH Regulation and is manufactured in and / or imported to the European Economic Area, at ≥ 10 000 to < 100 000 tonnes per annum.
Laurostearic acid is used by consumers, in articles, by professional workers (widespread uses), in formulation or re-packing, at industrial sites and in manufacturing.

Biocidal Uses of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is approved for use as a biocide in the EEA and/or Switzerland, for: repelling or attracting pests.

Consumer Uses of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is used in the following products: washing & cleaning products, coating products, fillers, putties, plasters, modelling clay, finger paints, polishes and waxes, air care products and plant protection products.
Other release to the environment of Laurostearic acid is likely to occur from: indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners) and outdoor use.

Article service life of Laurostearic acid:
Release to the environment of Laurostearic acid can occur from industrial use: industrial abrasion processing with high release rate (e.g. sanding operations or paint stripping by shot-blasting) and industrial abrasion processing with low release rate (e.g. cutting of textile, cutting, machining or grinding of metal).
Other release to the environment of Laurostearic acid is likely to occur from: indoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. flooring, furniture, toys, construction materials, curtains, foot-wear, leather products, paper and cardboard products, electronic equipment), outdoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. metal, wooden and plastic construction and building materials), outdoor use in long-life materials with high release rate (e.g. tyres, treated wooden products, treated textile and fabric, brake pads in trucks or cars, sanding of buildings (bridges, facades) or vehicles (ships)) and indoor use in long-life materials with high release rate (e.g. release from fabrics, textiles during washing, removal of indoor paints).
Laurostearic acid can be found in complex articles, with no release intended: vehicles and machinery, mechanical appliances and electrical/electronic products (e.g. computers, cameras, lamps, refrigerators, washing machines).
Laurostearic acid can be found in products with material based on: plastic (e.g. food packaging and storage, toys, mobile phones), fabrics, textiles and apparel (e.g. clothing, mattress, curtains or carpets, textile toys), leather (e.g. gloves, shoes, purses, furniture) and paper used for packaging (excluding food packaging).

Widespread uses of Laurostearic acid by professional workers:
Laurostearic acid is used in the following products: washing & cleaning products, polishes and waxes, adhesives and sealants, cosmetics and personal care products and laboratory chemicals.
Laurostearic acid is used in the following areas: formulation of mixtures and/or re-packaging and municipal supply (e.g. electricity, steam, gas, water) and sewage treatment.
Laurostearic acid is used for the manufacture of: textile, leather or fur.
Release to the environment of Laurostearic acid can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures and in processing aids at industrial sites.
Other release to the environment of Laurostearic acid is likely to occur from: indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners) and outdoor use.

Formulation or re-packing of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is used in the following products: polymers, pH regulators and water treatment products, leather treatment products, coating products, fillers, putties, plasters, modelling clay, finger paints, inks and toners, cosmetics and personal care products, lubricants and greases and textile treatment products and dyes.
Release to the environment of Laurostearic acid can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures and formulation in materials.

Uses of Laurostearic acid at industrial sites:
Laurostearic acid is used in the following products: washing & cleaning products, leather treatment products, polymers, textile treatment products and dyes, pH regulators and water treatment products and lubricants and greases.
Laurostearic acid is used in the following areas: formulation of mixtures and/or re-packaging and municipal supply (e.g. electricity, steam, gas, water) and sewage treatment.
Laurostearic acid is used for the manufacture of: textile, leather or fur.
Release to the environment of Laurostearic acid can occur from industrial use: in processing aids at industrial sites, in the production of articles, as processing aid and as processing aid.

Manufacture of Laurostearic acid:
Release to the environment of Laurostearic acid can occur from industrial use: manufacturing of the substance.

Laurostearic acid for acne:
Because Laurostearic acid has antibacterial properties, it’s been found to effectively combat acne. 
The bacteria Propionibacterium acnes are found naturally on the skin.
When they overgrow, they lead to the development of acne.

The results of a 2009 study found that Laurostearic acid could reduce inflammation and the number of bacteria present. 
Laurostearic acid worked even better than benzoyl peroxide, a common acne treatment. 
A 2016 study also reconfirmed the acne-fighting properties of Laurostearic acid.

This doesn’t mean you should put coconut oil on your acne. 
The researchers used pure Laurostearic acid and suggested that it could be developed into an antibiotic therapy for acne in the future.

Chemical formula: C12H24O2
Molar mass: 200.322 g·mol−1
Appearance    : White powder
Odor: Slight odor of bay oil
Density:
1.007 g/cm3 (24 °C) 
0.8744 g/cm3 (41.5 °C) 
0.8679 g/cm3 (50 °C) 
Melting point: 43.8 °C (110.8 °F; 316.9 K) 
Boiling point:
297.9 °C (568.2 °F; 571.0 K)
282.5 °C (540.5 °F; 555.6 K) at 512 mmHg 
225.1 °C (437.2 °F; 498.2 K) at 100 mmHg 
Solubility in water:
37 mg/L (0 °C)
55 mg/L (20 °C)
63 mg/L (30 °C)
72 mg/L (45 °C)
83 mg/L (100 °C) 
Solubility: Soluble in alcohols, diethyl ether, phenyls, haloalkanes, acetates 
Solubility in methanol:
12.7 g/100 g (0 °C)
120 g/100 g (20 °C)
2250 g/100 g (40 °C) 
Solubility in acetone:
8.95 g/100 g (0 °C)
60.5 g/100 g (20 °C)
1590 g/100 g (40 °C) 
Solubility in ethyl acetate:
9.4 g/100 g (0 °C)
52 g/100 g (20°C)
1250 g/100 g (40°C) 
Solubility in toluene:
15.3 g/100 g (0 °C)
97 g/100 g (20°C)
1410 g/100 g (40°C) 
log P    4.6 
Vapor pressure:
2.13·10−6 kPa (25 °C) 
0.42 kPa (150 °C) 
6.67 kPa (210 °C) 
Acidity (pKa):5.3 (20 °C) 
Thermal conductivity:
0.442 W/m·K (solid) 
0.1921 W/m·K (72.5 °C)
0.1748 W/m·K (106 °C) 
Refractive index (nD):
1.423 (70 °C) 
1.4183 (82 °C) 
Viscosity:
6.88 cP (50 °C)
5.37 cP (60 °C)

How to use Laurostearic acid:
To reap the topical benefits of Laurostearic acid and coconut oil, apply it directly to your skin.
While this isn’t recommended for people with acne, the risks are minimal when it comes to addressing issues such as skin hydration and psoriasis.

General description of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is the most abundant fatty acid present in coconut oil. 
Laurostearic acid is also one of the main flavor constituents of Chinese rice wine and sweet cream butter. 
Laurostearic acid is commonly used in lubricants and also in edible-coating formulations.

Overview of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is a saturated fat. 
Laurostearic acid is found in many vegetable fats, particularly in coconut and palm kernel oils.
People use Laurostearic acid as medicine.

Laurostearic acid is used for treating viral infections including influenza (the flu); swine flu; avian flu; the common cold; fever blisters, cold sores, and genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV); genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV); and HIV/AIDS. 
Laurostearic acid is also used for preventing the transmission of HIV from mothers to children.

Other uses for Laurostearic acid include treatment of bronchitis, gonorrhea, yeast infections, chlamydia, intestinal infections caused by a parasite called Giardia lamblia, and ringworm.
In foods, Laurostearic acid is used as a vegetable shortening.
In manufacturing, Laurostearic acid is used to make soap and shampoo.

Laurostearic acid and myristic acid are saturated fatty acids. 
Their formal names are dodecanoic acid and tetradecanoic acid, respectively. 
Both are white solids that are very slightly soluble in water.

Laurostearic acid esters (principally triglycerides) are found only in vegetable fats, primarily from coconut milk and oil, laurel oil, and palm kernel oil. 
In contrast, myristic acid triglycerides occur in plants and animals, notably in nutmeg butter, coconut oil, and mammalian milk.

Fatty acids have a bad name because they are strongly associated with high serum cholesterol levels in humans. 
Lauric and myristic acids are among the worst offenders; therefore, many governmental and health organizations advise that coconut oil and milk, among other high–saturated fat substances, should be excluded from the diet.

Glycerides of Laurostearic acid are gaining more interest in the fight against viral diseases. 
Their molecular structure makes them able to attack fat-enveloped viruses by destroying their fat-envelope. 
Several in vitro trials reveal that the antiviral effects of Laurostearic acid glycerides are outperforming glycerides of other MCFAs. 
Globally, glycerides of Laurostearic acid are applied to suppress the negative impact of Infectious Bronchitis (IB), Newcastle Disease (ND), Avian Influenza (AI), Marek’s disease (MD) and others.

As a result of the multiple actions of Laurostearic acid glycerides, FRA C12 is a successful tool in antibiotic free diets. 
One will notice a reduction in curative antibiotic usage as well as improved animal health and performance with the use of glycerides of Dodecanoic Acid. 

Laurostearic acid is a versatile oleochemical with applications in everything from plastics to personal care. 
Found in numerous plants including the palm tree and cohune palm, as well as in coconut oil, palm seeds, betel nuts and macadamia nuts, Dodecanoic Acid is classified as a saturated fat featuring a 12-carbon atom chain.

There are some researchers who believe that Laurostearic acid may be safer than trans-fats when used in food preparation.
Laurostearic acid is a white, powdery solid that exhibits a slight odor reminiscent of bay oil or soap. 
As with most fatty acids, Laurostearic acid is non-toxic, making it safe for use in a wide range of applications. 
Additionally, Laurostearic acid is relatively inexpensive, making it a popular ingredient in manufacturing processes where cost is a key consideration.

Applications of Laurostearic acid:
Laurostearic acid is mainly used in the manufacturing of soaps and other cosmetics. 
In scientific laboratories, Laurostearic acid is often used to investigate the molar mass of unknown substances via freezing-point depression. 
In industry, Laurostearic acid is used as an intermediate and as a surface active agent. 

The consumer market uses Laurostearic acid in the cleaning, furnishing, and production of personal care products. 
In medicine, Laurostearic acid is known to increase total serum cholesterol more than many of the other fatty acids.
Laurostearic acid uses include acid chlorides, amphoteric surfactant intermediate, anti ageing creams & lotions, antiperspirants, bar soap, betaines, body wash, cosmetics, deodorants, emollient, emulsifier, exfoliant scrub, facial cleaner, foundations, glycerol esters, hair care, hair colorants, imidazolines, lip balm, liquid hand soap, lubricant, moisturizing cream formulations, organic peroxides, sarcosinates, shaving cream, shower gels, skin care products, etc.

Treatment for intestinal infections and ringworm caused by the parasite. 
Laurostearic acid in foods is used as a vegetable abbreviation. 
In manufacturing, Laurostearic acid is used to make soap and shampoo. 
It is not known how Laurostearic acid works as a medicine. 
Some research suggests that Laurostearic acid may be a safer oil than trans fats in food preparations. 

Laurostearic acid is a saturated fatty acid. 
Laurostearic acids official name is dodecanoic acid. 
Laurostearic acid is a white coat that is slightly soluble in water. 
Laurostearic acid esters (mainly triglycerides) are only found in vegetable oils, particularly coconut milk and oil, bay oil, and palm kernel oil. 
In contrast, myristic acid triglycerides occur in plants and animals, particularly nutmeg oil, coconut oil, and mammalian milk.

Fatty acids have a bad name because they are strongly associated with high serum cholesterol levels in humans. 
Lauric and myristic acids are among the worst offenders; 
For this reason, many governments and health organizations recommend that coconut oil and milk, along with other high-saturated fat substances, should be eliminated from the diet. 
Laurostearic acid, or systematically, dodecanoic acid is a saturated fatty acid with a chain of 12 carbon atoms, hence a It has many properties, it is a dark colored oil solid, a dark colored oil solid and a dark oil. 
Salts and esters of Laurostearic acid are known as laureates.

Laurostearic acid and monolaurin have significantly significant antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria and a number of fungi and viruses. 
Today, there are many commercial products that use Laurostearic acid and monolaurin as antimicrobial agents. 
Because of the significant differences in Laurostearic acid properties compared to longer chain fatty acids, they are typically divided into medium chain fatty acids covering C6 - C12 and long chain fatty acids covering C14 and longer. 
Coconut oil is all the rage in natural beauty and wellness regimens. 

Numerous blogs and natural health websites have come out as a miracle product and have been able to do anything to relieve chapped skin. 
However, when you break down coconut oil into its active parts, things start to look less miraculous and more like science. 
Laurostearic acid is one of those active parts. 

Laurostearic acid is a medium-length long-chain fatty acid or lipid that makes up about half of the fatty acids in coconut oil.
Laurostearic acid is often used in lab research of melting point depression Used, inexpensive, non-toxic and safe to use. 
Laurostearic acid is a solid at room temperature but dissolves easily in boiling water, so liquid Dodecanoic Acid can be processed with a variety of solutes and used to determine their molecular mass.

The numerous Laurostearic acid uses include:

Plastics: 
In plastics manufacturing applications, Laurostearic acid serves as an intermediate, which is substance formed during the middle stages of a chemical reaction between the reactants and the finished product.

Food and Beverage: 
One of the more common uses of Laurostearic acid is as raw material for emulsifiers in various food and beverage additives, particularly in the manufacturing of vegetable shortening. 
Dodecanoic Acids nontoxicity also makes Laurostearic acid safe for use in food production.

Surfactants and Esters: 
When used as anionic and nonionic surfactants, Laurostearic acid has the ability to reduce surface tension between liquids and solids.

Textiles: 
Laurostearic acid works well as a lubricant & process agent in textile manufacturing applications, as it has the ability to help water mix with oil.

Personal Care: 
One of the more common Laurostearic acid uses is as an emulsifier for facial creams and lotions, as it possesses a strong ability to cleanse skin and hair. 
Laurostearic acid is also easy to wash away after use. 
You can find Laurostearic acid in many personal care products such as shampoos, body washes and shower gels.

Soaps and Detergents: 
When used as a base in the production of liquid and transparent soaps, Laurostearic acid can control the level of lathering, add conditioning properties and enhance overall cleaning ability.

Medical: 
Laurostearic acid can be found in a variety of medicines used for treating viral infections, certain forms of influenza, fever blisters, cold sores, bronchitis, yeast infections, gonorrhea, genital herpes and many others. 
However, there is insufficient evidence to determine its overall effectiveness in treating these conditions. 
Preliminary research also indicates that Laurostearic acid may aid in the treatment of acne as well.

Laurostearic acid, or dodecanoic acid, is the main acid in coconut oil and in palm kernel oil, and is believed to have antimicrobial properties. 
The detected values of half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) of Laurostearic acid on P. acnes, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis growth indicate that P. acnes is the most sensitive to Dodecanoic Acid among these bacteria. 
In addition, Laurostearic acid did not induce cytotoxicity to human sebocytes. 
This data highlight the potential of using Laurostearic acid as an alternative treatment for antibiotic therapy of acne vulgaris.
Laurostearic acid is used in the manufacture of soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and lauryl alcohol.

Cleansing : Helps to keep a clean surface
Emulsifying : Promotes the formation of intimate mixtures between immiscible liquids by modifying the interfacial tension (water and oil)
Surfactant : Reduces the surface tension of cosmetics and contributes to the even distribution of the product when it is used

Laurostearic acid is a fatty acid obtained from coconut oil and other veg- etable fats. 
Laurostearic acid is practically insoluble in water but is soluble in alco- hol, chloroform, and ether. 
Laurostearic acid functions as a lubricant, binder, and defoaming agent.

Laurostearic acid(143-07-7) is a carboxylic acid. 
Carboxylic acids donate hydrogen ions if a base is present to accept them. 
They react in this way with all bases, both organic (for example, the amines) and inorganic. 
Their reactions with bases, called "neutralizations'', are accompanied by the evolution of substantial amounts of heat. 
Neutralization between an acid and a base produces water plus a salt. 

Carboxylic acids in aqueous solution and liquid or molten carboxylic acids can react with active metals to form gaseous hydrogen and a metal salt. 
Such reactions occur in principle for solid carboxylic acids as well, but are slow if the solid acid remains dry. 
Even "insoluble" carboxylic acids may absorb enough water from the air and dissolve sufficiently in Laurostearic acid(143-07-7) to corrode or dissolve iron, steel, and aluminum parts and containers.

Carboxylic acids, like other acids, react with cyanide salts to generate gaseous hydrogen cyanide. 
The reaction is slower for dry, solid carboxylic acids. 
Insoluble carboxylic acids react with solutions of cyanides to cause the release of gaseous hydrogen cyanide. 
Flammable and/or toxic gases and heat are generated by the reaction of carboxylic acids with diazo compounds, dithiocarbamates, isocyanates, mercaptans, nitrides, and sulfides. 
Carboxylic acids, especially in aqueous solution, also react with sulfites, nitrites, thiosulfates (to give H2S and SO3), dithionite (SO2), to generate flammable and/or toxic gases and heat.

Their reaction with carbonates and bicarbonates generates a harmless gas (carbon dioxide) but still heat. 
Like other organic compounds, carboxylic acids can be oxidized by strong oxidizing agents and reduced by strong reducing agents. 
These reactions generate heat. 

A wide variety of products is possible. 
Like other acids, carboxylic acids may initiate polymerization reactions; like other acids, they often catalyze (increase the rate of) chemical reactions. 
This compound can react with oxidizing materials.

The surfactants types of dodecanoic acid are listed in the attached table of this item. 
Some surfactants of the derivatives of dodecanoic acid and dodecanol are also antiseptics, such as dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (geramine), dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium bromide (bromo-geramine) and dodecyl dimethyl (2-phenoxyethyl) ammonium bromide (domiphen bromide). 
The dodecyldimethyllammonium-2,4,5-trichlorophenolate in these derivatives can be used as citrus preservative. 
Laurostearic acid also has many applications in plastic additives, food additives, spices and pharmaceutical industries.

Laurostearic acid (C-12) is very common in nature. 
Which is a type of monoglyceride when it enters the body converted to monolaurin. 
Monolaurin; antiviral, antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antifungal It is a substance that stands out with its features.

Laurostearic acid, or systematically, dodecanoic acid is a saturated fatty acid with a chain of 12 carbon atoms, hence it has many properties of medium chain fatty acids, it is a dark fatty solid and a dark fatty solid and a dark oil. 
Salts and esters of Laurostearic acid are known as laureates.
Laurostearic acids chemical formula is CH3 (CH2) 1 (/ 0) COOH.

White crystals. Both dodecanoic acid and dodecilic acid. 
Melting point 44.8 ° C, Boiling point 176 ° C (15 mm Hg). It is insoluble in water, soluble in ethanol. 
Raw materials for lauryl alcohol, raw material for detergents and plasticizers. 
In coconut oil, glycerin is found as an ester.

Occurrence of Laurostearic acid: 
Laurostearic acid, a component of triglycerides, makes up about half the fatty acid content in coconut milk, coconut oil, laurel oil, and palm kernel oil (not to be confused with palm oil), otherwise, it is relatively rare. 
Laurostearic acid is also found in breast milk (6.2% of total fat), cow's milk (2.9%) and goat's milk (3.1%). 
Laurostearic acid is one of these active parts. 
Laurostearic acid is a medium-length long-chain fatty acid or lipid that makes up about half of the fatty acids in coconut oil. 

Laurostearic acid is a potent substance sometimes extracted from coconut for use in developing monolaurin. 
Monolaurin, bacteria, Laurostearic acid is an antimicrobial agent that can fight pathogens such as viruses and yeasts. 
You cannot digest Laurostearic acid alone, as it is irritating and does not occur alone in nature.

You are most likely to get it in the form of coconut oil or fresh coconut.
While coconut oil is being studied at breakthrough speed, most of the research does not pinpoint exactly what is responsible for the oil's reported benefits.
Since coconut oil contains a lot more than Laurostearic acid, it would be too long to credit Dodecanoic Acid with all the benefits of coconut oil. 

Still, a 2015 analysis suggested that most of the benefits linked to coconut oil were directly attributed to Dodecanoic Acid. 
They suggest that Laurostearic acid may aid weight loss and protect against Alzheimer's disease, among other benefits. 
The effects on blood cholesterol levels still need to be cl

IUPAC names:
1-Dodecansäure
docecanoic acid
DODECANOIC ACID
Dodecanoic Acid
Dodecanoic acid
dodecanoic acid
Dodecanoic Acid
Dodecanoic Acid
Dodecanoic Acid
Dodecanoic Acid
Lauric acid
lauric acid
Laurinic acid
Laurinsäure
n-Dodecanoic acid

SYNONYMS: 
Emery651
Dodecanoic Acid(C12:0)
Lauric acid 98%
yeuguisuan
Laurosteaic acid
Lauric acid 98-101 % (acidimetric)
lauric acid, pure
LAURIC ACID, 99.5+%
LAURIC ACID, STANDARD FOR GC
LAURIC ACID 98+% FCC
LAURIC ACID 98+% NATURAL FCC
LauricAcid99%Min.
LauricAcidPureC12H24O2
Lauric Acid-methyl-D3
lauricacid,dodecanoicacid
n-Dodecanoic
LAURICACID,REAGENT
LAURIC ACID(SG)
LAURIC ACID FCC
LAURIC ACID, NATURAL & KOSHER
LAURIC ACID, NATURAL & KOSHER (POWDER)
Dodecanoic acid, typically 99%
N-DODECANOIC ACID
RARECHEM AL BO 0156
acidelaurique
Aliphat no. 4
AliphatNo.4
C-1297
Dodecanoic (Lauric) acid
dodecanoic acid (lauric acid)
Dodecansαure
Dodecylic acid
dodecylicacid
Duodecyclic acid
Duodecylic acid
duodecylicacid
Emery 650
1-Dodecanoic acid
LAURINSAEURE
Lauric acid,99.8+%
Lauric acid,95%
Lauric acid,99%
Dodecanoic acid, typically 99.5%
NSC 5026
Palmac 99-12
Trichloroacetic acid lauryl ester
Hendecane-1-carboxylic acid
Lauric acid≥ 98% (GC)
AKOS 222-45
C12
C12:0 ACID
CARBOXYLIC ACID C12
LAUROSTEARIC ACID
LAURIC ACID
FEMA 2614
DODECOIC ACID
DODECANOIC ACID
1-Undecanecarboxylic acid

Regulatory process names:
Dodecanoic acid
Lauric acid
Lauric Acid
Lauric acid
lauric acid

Translated names:
Acid lauric (ro)
Acide laurique (fr)
Acido laurico (it)
Aċidu lawriku (mt)
Ido láurico (pt)
Kwas laurynowy (pl)
Kyselina dodekánová (sk)
Lauric acid (no)
Lauriinhape (et)
Lauriinihappo (fi)
Laurinezuur (nl)
Laurinsav (hu)
Laurinska kiselina (hr)
Laurinsyra (sv)
Laurinsyre (da)
Laurinsäure (de)
Laurová kyselina (cs)
Laurīnskābe (lv)
Lavrinska kislina (sl)
Uro rūgštis (lt)
Ácido láurico (es)
Λαυρικό οξύ (el)
Додеканова киселина (bg)

CAS names:
Dodecanoic acid

IUPAC names:
1-Dodecansäure
docecanoic acid
DODECANOIC ACID
Dodecanoic Acid
Dodecanoic acid
dodecanoic acid
Lauric Acid
Lauric acid
lauric acid
Lauric Acid
Lauric acid
lauric acid
Laurinic acid
Laurinsäure
n-Dodecanoic acid

Trade names:
DODECANOIC ACID
KORTACID 1299/ 1298/ 1295
Lauric Acid
MASCID 1298
MASCID 1299
PALMAC 98-12
PALMAC 99-12
Palmata 1299
PALMERA
RADIACID 0653
SINAR - FA1299
Tefacid Lauric 98
UNIOLEO FA 1299

Other identifiers:
143-07-7
203714-07-2
203714-07-2
7632-48-6
7632-48-6
8000-62-2
8000-62-2
8045-27-0
8045-27-0

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