MELAMINE

Melamine = Cyanuramide = Triaminotriazine

CAS number: 108-78-1
EC number: 203-615-4
Molecular formula: C3H6N6

Melamine /ˈmɛləmiːn/ is an organic compound with the formula C3H6N6. 
Melamine is a trimer of cyanamide, with a 1,3,5-triazine skeleton. 
Like cyanamide, Melamine contains 67% nitrogen by mass, and its derivatives have fire retardant properties due to its release of nitrogen gas when burned or charred. 
Melamine can be combined with formaldehyde and other agents to produce melamine resins. 

Melamine is a chemical compound with a number of uses, including manufacturing laminates, glues, dinnerware, and more. 
Melamine can also be made in a wide range of colors and styles, making it an extremely versatile product that can be used in a variety of settings. 
Melamine is created by combining melamine resin with strengthening materials, which means it can stand up to the rigors of everyday use.

Melamine, also called cyanuramide or triaminotriazine, a colourless crystalline substance belonging to the family of heterocyclic organic compounds, which are used principally as a starting material for the manufacture of synthetic resins. 
Melamine is rich in nitrogen, a property that is similar to protein.
Such resins are characteristically durable thermosetting plastic used in high pressure decorative laminates such as Formica, melamine dinnerware, laminate flooring, and dry erase boards.
Melamine foam is used as insulation, soundproofing material and in polymeric cleaning products, such as Magic Eraser.

Melamine is sometimes illegally added to food products in order to increase the apparent protein content.
Ingestion of melamine may lead to reproductive damage, or bladder or kidney stones, and bladder cancer. 
Melamine is also an irritant when inhaled or in contact with the skin or eyes. 
The United Nations' food standards body, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, has set the maximum amount of melamine allowed in powdered infant formula to 1 mg/kg and the amount of the chemical allowed in other foods and animal feed to 2.5 mg/kg. 
While not legally binding, the levels allow countries to ban importation of products with excessive levels of melamine.

Uses of Melamine
In one large-scale application, melamine is combined with formaldehyde and other agents to produce melamine resins. 
Such resins are characteristically durable thermosetting plastic used in high-pressure decorative laminates such as Formica, melamine dinnerware, laminate flooring, and dry erase boards.
Melamine foam is used as insulation, soundproofing material and in polymeric cleaning products, such as Magic Eraser.
Melamine is one of the major components in Pigment Yellow 150, a colorant in inks and plastics.

Melamine also enters the fabrication of melamine polysulfonate, used as a superplasticizer for making high-resistance concrete. 
Sulfonated melamine formaldehyde (SMF) is a polymer used as a cement admixture to reduce the water content in concrete while increasing the fluidity and the workability of the mix during handling and pouring. 
Melamine results in concrete with a lower porosity and a higher mechanical strength, exhibiting an improved resistance to aggressive environments and a longer lifetime.

The use of melamine as fertilizer for crops had been envisioned during the 1950s and 1960s because of its high nitrogen content (2/3).
However, melamine is much more expensive to produce than are other common nitrogen fertilizers, such as urea. 
The mineralization (degradation to ammonia) for melamine is slow, making this product both economically and scientifically impractical for use as a fertilizer.

What is melamine?
Melamine is a chemical that has many industrial uses. 
Melamine is approved for use in the manufacturing of some cooking utensils, plates, plastic products, paper, paperboard, and industrial coatings, among other things. 
Melamine is not registered as a fertilizer in the U.S., melamine has been used as a fertilizer in some parts of the world.
Melamine may be used in the manufacturing of packaging for food products, but is not FDA-approved for direct addition to human food or animal feeds marketed in the U.S.

Melamine is chemical compound originally found to be toxic only in large quantities and in those cases, results in negative effects on kidney function. 
However, new research is shedding light on just how much damage can be done to the human body from ingesting melamine. 
Exposure to melamine has negative impacts on brain development and reproductive functions because it changes how hormones work in the body.

Where is Melamine Found?
Melamine can be found in pretty much every type of dishware, cups, plates, bowls and utensils as the compound makes these things dishwasher safe, inexpensive to produce, and extremely durable. 
Remember how I mentioned before that these plates don't look like they're plastic? 

Melamine and its salts are used as fire-retardant additives in paints, plastics, and paper.
A melamine fibre, Basofil, has low thermal conductivity, excellent flame resistance and is self-extinguishing; this makes it useful for flame-resistant protective clothing, either alone or as a blend with other fibres.
Melamine derivatives of arsenical drugs are potentially important in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis.
Melamine use as non-protein nitrogen (NPN) for cattle was described in a 1958 patent.
In 1978, however, a study concluded that melamine "may not be an acceptable non-protein N source for ruminants" because its hydrolysis in cattle is slower and less complete than other nitrogen sources such as cottonseed meal and urea.

Melamine is sometimes illegally added to food products in order to increase the apparent protein content. 
Standard tests, such as the Kjeldahl and Dumas tests, estimate protein levels by measuring the nitrogen content, so they can be misled by adding nitrogen-rich compounds such as melamine. 
There are instruments available today which can differentiate melamine nitrogen from protein nitrogen.

Regulation in food and feed
The United Nations' food standards body, Codex Alimentarius Commission, has set the maximum amount of melamine allowed in powdered infant formula to 1 mg/kg and the amount of the chemical allowed in other foods and animal feed to 2.5 mg/kg. 
While not legally binding, the levels allow countries to ban importation of products with excessive levels of melamine.

Melamine is used in the following products: laboratory chemicals, coating products and polymers.
Melamine is used in the following areas: building & construction work.
Melamine is used for the manufacture of: plastic products.
Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use and outdoor use resulting in inclusion into or onto a materials (e.g. binding agent in paints and coatings or adhesives).

Melamine is used in the following products: polymers, coating products, adhesives and sealants, leather treatment products, laboratory chemicals and washing & cleaning products.
Release to the environment of Melamine can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures.
Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners) and outdoor use.

Widespread uses by professional workers
Melamine is used in the following products: laboratory chemicals, coating products and polymers.
Melamine is used in the following areas: building & construction work.
Melamine is used for the manufacture of: plastic products.
Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use and outdoor use resulting in inclusion into or onto a materials (e.g. binding agent in paints and coatings or adhesives).

Formulation or re-packing
Melamine is used in the following products: polymers, coating products, adhesives and sealants, leather treatment products, laboratory chemicals and washing & cleaning products.
Release to the environment of Melamine can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures.
Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners) and outdoor use.
Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners), outdoor use, outdoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. metal, wooden and plastic construction and building materials) and indoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. flooring, furniture, toys, construction materials, curtains, foot-wear, leather products, paper and cardboard products, electronic equipment).

Description    
Melamine-formaldehyde resin (MFR) is an active ingredient of strong (reinforced) plasters. 
Sensitization was reported in a plaster-room technician, who applied resin-reinforced pIaster casts, and in dental technicians. 
MFR was contained in a strong dental pIaster used for mouldings. 
Used as a textile finish res in, it was also found to be an allergen in a women who replaced clothes in a store. 
MFR also releases formaldehyde, which may be the sensitizer.

Melamine-formaldehyde resin (MFR) is an active ingredient of strong (reinforced) plasters. 
Sensitization was reported in a plaster-room technician, who applied resin-reinforced pIaster casts, and in dental technicians. 
MFR was contained in a strong dental pIaster used for mouldings. 
Used as a textile finish res in, it was also found to be an allergen in a women who replaced clothes in a store. 
MFR also releases formaldehyde, which may be the sensitizer.

Definition    
A white solid organic compound whose molecules consist of a sixmembered heterocyclic ring of alternate carbon and nitrogen atoms with three amino groups attached to the carbons. 
Condensation polymerization with methanal or other aldehydes produces melamine resins, which are important thermosetting plastics.
melamine: A white crystalline compound,C3N6H6. 
Melamine is a cycliccompound having a six-memberedring of alternating C and N atoms,with three NH2 groups. 
Melamine can becopolymerized with methanal to givethermosetting melamine resins,which are used particularly for laminatedcoatings.

Production Methods
Melamine is prepared almost exclusively by the urea process—the action of ammonia on urea. 
Melamine is produced worldwide.

General Description
Colorless to white monoclinic crystals or prisms or white powder. Sublimes when gently heated.

Incompatibilities    
Incompatible with oxidizers (chlorates, nitrates, peroxides, permanganates, perchlorates, chlorine, bromine, fluorine, etc.); contact may cause fires or explosions. 
Keep away from alkaline materials, strong bases, strong acids, oxoacids, epoxides. 
Melamine neutralizes acids in exothermic reactions to form salts plus water. 
May be incompatible with isocyanates, halogenated organics, peroxides, phenols (acidic), epoxides, anhydrides, and acid halides. 
Flammable gaseous hydrogen may be generated in combination with strong reducing agents such as hydrides, nitrides, alkali metals, and sulfides.

Melamine appears as colorless to white monoclinic crystals or prisms or white powder. 
Sublimes when gently heated.

Melamine is a trimer of cyanamide, with a 1,3,5-triazine skeleton. 
Melamine has a role as a xenobiotic metabolite. 
Melamine derives from a cyanamide. 
Melamine is a conjugate base of a melamine(1+).


Uses of Melamine
-General adhesives and binding agents for a variety of uses    
-Additive for products to promote hardening, used in paints and varnishes, plastics, etc.    
-Antiwrinkle agents    
-General term which includes clothes, shoes, backpacks/purses/luggage, jewelry, pet apparel, etc.; more specific terms (e.g. clothing, footwear, handwear)
-Relatived to the maintenance and repair of automobiles, products for cleaning and caring for automobiles (auto shampoo, polish/wax, undercarriage treatment, brake grease) 
-Binding agents, used in paint, sand, etc    
-Related to the building or construction process for buildings or boats (includes activities such as plumbing and electrical work, bricklaying, etc)    
-Bricks or related to bricklaying/masonry    
-Materials used in the building process, such as flooring, insulation, caulk, tile, wood, glass, etc.    

Uses of Melamine
-Fillers for paints, textiles, plastics, etc    
-Flooring materials (carpets, wood, vinyl flooring), or related to flooring such as wax or polish for floors    
-Insulating materials to protect from noise, cold, etc (such as used in homes or buildings), insulating materials related to electricity    
-Related to cement, concrete, or asphalt materials    
-Wall construction materials, or wall coverings    
-Wood used as a building material, wood preservatives    
-Casting agents or molding compounds for plastics, sand, or metals    

Uses of Melamine
-Modifier used for chemical, when chemical is used in a laboratory    
-Term used for colorants, dyes, or pigments; includes colorants for drugs, textiles, personal care products (cosmetics, tatoo inks, hair dye), food colorants, and inks for printing
-General construction (as opposed to those things labeled building_construction)
-Plastic products, industry for plastics, manufacturing of plastics, plastic additives
-Insulating materials to protect from noise, cold, etc (such as used in homes or buildings), insulating materials related to electricity
-Fillers for paints, textiles, plastics, etc    
-Fire prevention materials, or additives/coatings to prevent flammability in paints, textiles, plastics, etc     

Melamine, melamine cyanurate, other melamine salts and guanidine compounds are currently the most used group of nitrogen-containing flame retardants.
Melamine is used as a flame retardant additive for polypropylene and polyethylene. 
Melamine cyanurate is employed commercially as a flame retardant for polyamides and terephthalates (PET/PBT) and is being developed for use in epoxy and polyurethane resins. 
Melamine phosphate is also used as a flame retardant for terephthalates (PET/PBT) and is currently being developed for use in epoxy and polyurethane flame retardant formulations. 
Also in the development stages for use as flame-retardant additives are melamine salts and melamine formaldehyde for their application in thermoset resins.
Melamine resins, organic syntheses, leather tanning.

Industry Uses
-Adhesives and sealant chemicals
-Fillers
-Flame retardants
-Intermediates
-It is a monomer used as a reactant for polymer resin for pigments.
-Paint additives and coating additives not described by other categories
-Pigments
-Processing aids, not otherwise listed

Consumer Uses
-Adhesives and sealants
-Building/construction materials - wood and engineered wood products
-Building/construction materials not covered elsewhere
-Foam seating and bedding products
-Ink, toner, and colorant products
-Paints and coatings
-Plastic and rubber products not covered elsewhere

Methods of Manufacturing
Melamine is produced from urea by a high or low pressure process in either one or two stages. 
In the low pressure route, the reaction is carried out in the vapour phase generally using an alumina catalyst. 
Urea forms isocyanic acid, which is converted first to cyanamide and then to melamine. 
In the high pressure process, carried out in the liquid phase without a catalyst, urea forms cyanuric acid which is reacted with ammonia to form melamine. 
Carbon dioxide and ammonia by-products are recycled to urea.

General Manufacturing Information
Industry Processing Sectors
-Adhesive manufacturing
-Furniture and related product manufacturing
-Miscellaneous manufacturing
-Paint and coating manufacturing
-Plastic material and resin manufacturing
-Plastics product manufacturing
-Printing and related support activities
-Synthetic dye and pigment manufacturing
-Wholesale and retail trade
-Wood product manufacturing

IDENTIFICATION: 
Melamine is a monoclinic prismatic substance that is slightly soluble in water and ethanol. 
Melamine is insoluble in diethyl ether. 
Melamine forms synthetic resins with formaldehyde. 
Melamine is used in the manufacture of melamine resins, laminates, surface coating resins, plastic molding compounds, textile resins, bonding resins, gypsum melamine resin mixtures, orthopedic casts, rubber additives and paper products. 
Melamine is a nitrogen-based compound used by many manufacturers to create a number of products, especially plastic dishware. 

Melamine is also used in:
-utensils
-countertops
-plastic products
-dry-erase boards
-paper products
-While melamine is widely found in many items, some people have raised safety concerns that the compound could be toxic.

Is Melamine safe?
The short answer is yes, Melamine is safe.

When manufacturers create plasticware with melamine, they use high heat to mold the substances.
While the heat uses up most of the melamine compounds, a small amount does usually remain in the plates, cup, utensils or more. 
If melamine gets too hot, it can start to melt and potentially leak into food and drink products.

Is Melamine Tolerant to Hot and Cold Uses?
Melamine is an insulator, not a conductor. 
This means that while Melamine may maintain temperatures longer than other types of plastic, Melamine takes a long time for the temperature of the material to change. 
So, melamine stays cool to the touch when serving hot foods because the food does not produce enough heat for a long enough period of time to change the temperature of the material itself. 
This protects restaurant servers and diners from burn hazards associated with hot plates and other servingware. 
Thanks to Melamines heat-resistant properties, melamine is also great for kitchen tools that are used when handling hot soups and boiling water.

Because melamine is such a great insulator, it's also ideal for cold food and buffet displays. 
Melamine food pans are great for cold applications like deli displays, buffets, salad bars, and more. 
For a stylish catered display, place melamine in an ice-filled container to keep plated items cool.

Where is Melamine Used?
Thanks to Melamines durable, light weight construction, melamine is a popular choice for a variety of commercial settings, like dining halls, day care facilities, and assisted living communities. 
However, you can find designer melamine dinnerware that looks just like handcrafted ceramic for an upscale feel that's appropriate in more sophisticated restaurants. 
The low risk of breakage makes melamine an ideal choice for restaurants that serve appetizers poolside or on the beach. 
From bistros to barbecue shacks, you can find melamine dinnerware that suits the decor of nearly any foodservice establishment. 
Melamine's durability makes Melamine ideal for use in a variety of outdoor or high-volume settings.

Etymology
The German word Melamin was coined by combining the words Melam (a derivative of ammonium thiocyanate) and amine.
Melamine is, therefore, unrelated etymologically to the root melas (μελας, meaning "black" in Greek), from which the words melanin, a pigment, and melatonin, a hormone, are formed.

Manufacture and applications of melamine
Melamine can be manufactured from dicyandiamide, hydrogen cyanide, or urea. Modern commercial production of melamine typically employs urea as a starting material. 
Urea is broken down to cyanuric acid, which then can be reacted to form melamine. 
Melamines most important reaction is that with formaldehyde, forming melamine-formaldehyde resins of high molecular weight. 
These compounds form under the influence of heat and then become fixed into an insoluble and infusible mold; this process is known as thermosetting. 
Melamine-based thermoset materials contain cross-linked polymers, which make the fixed molds strong and durable. 
Usually formulated with fillers and pigments, melamine resins can be molded into dishes, containers, utensils, handles, and the like or used as laminating agents or coating materials for wood, paper, and textiles. 
Formica and Melmac are well-known trade names for products based on melamine resins.

Melamine has also been incorporated into a variety of flame-retardant materials. This application is based on the compound’s high nitrogen content. 
When exposed to heat, melamine degrades and releases nitrogen. 
The freed nitrogen takes the place of oxygen in the surface air surrounding the material, which prevents the material from burning. 
Butylated melamine resins, made by incorporating butyl alcohol into the melamine–formaldehyde reaction mixture, are fluids used as ingredients of paints and varnishes. 
A copolymer containing melamine, formaldehyde, and sodium bisulfite produces a foam with sound-absorbing and flame-retardant properties. 
The foam has a notably hard microbubble structure, which gives Melamine an abrasive quality that has been utilized in the development of cleaning products

Synthesis and reactions
Melamine was first synthesized by the German chemist Justus von Liebig in 1834. 
In early production, first calcium cyanamide was converted into dicyandiamide, which was heated above its melting temperature to produce melamine. 
Today most industrial manufacturers use urea in the following reaction to produce melamine:6 (NH2)2CO → C3H6N6 + 6 NH3 + 3 CO2
In the first step, urea decomposes into cyanic acid and ammonia:
(NH2)2CO → HNCO + NH3
Cyanic acid polymerizes to cyanuric acid, which condenses with the liberated ammonia forming melamine. 

Uses of Melamine
-Includes food packaging, paper plates, cutlery, small appliances such as roasters, etc.; does not include facilities that manufacture food
-Residues found in food, typically from drugs or pesticides    
-Furniture, or the manufacturing of furniture (can include chairs and tables, and more general furniture such as mattresses, patio furniture, etc.)
-Wood used as a building material, wood preservatives    
-General adhesives and binding agents for a variety of uses    
-Term used for colorants, dyes, or pigments; includes colorants for drugs, textiles, personal care products (cosmetics, tatoo inks, hair dye), food colorants, and inks for printing
-General adhesives and binding agents for a variety of uses    

Uses of Melamine
-Wood used as a building material, wood preservatives    
-Term used for colorants, dyes, or pigments; includes colorants for drugs, textiles, personal care products (cosmetics, tatoo inks, hair dye), food colorants, and inks for printing
-Related to manufacturing for export
-Furniture, or the manufacturing of furniture (can include chairs and tables, and more general furniture such as mattresses, patio furniture, etc.)
-Inks used for printing or writing
-Related to metals - manufacturing of metals, casting of metals, production of metals, surface treatment of metals, etc
-Various types of paint for various use
-Plastic products, industry for plastics, manufacturing of plastics, plastic additives
-Raw materials used in a variety of products and industries (e.g. in cosmetics, chemical manufacturing, production of metals, etc)
-Rubber products (e.g. tires) and their manufacture    

Uses of Melamine
-Textiles used for clothing or furniture upholstery, processes related to textiles (e.g. softeners, antiwrinkle agents), or the processing/manufacturing of textiles 
-Relatived to the maintenance and repair of automobiles, products for cleaning and caring for automobiles (auto shampoo, polish/wax, undercarriage treatment, brake grease) 
-Fire prevention materials, or additives/coatings to prevent flammability in paints, textiles, plastics, etc
-Modifier included when source indicates the product is water based
-Related to the manufcturing of pulp or paper products, or paper products in general    
-Substances used for preventing, destroying or mitigating pests    
-Includes spices, extracts, colorings, flavors, etc added to food for human consumption    
-Inert ingredients in a pesticide    
-Textiles used for clothing or furniture upholstery, processes related to textiles (e.g. softeners, antiwrinkle agents), or the processing/manufacturing of textiles

The released water reacts with cyanic acid, which helps to drive the reaction:
6 HNCO + 3 NH3 → C3H6N6 + 3 CO2 + 3NH3
The above reaction can be carried out by either of two methods: catalyzed gas-phase production or high pressure liquid-phase production. 
In one method, molten urea is introduced onto a fluidized bed with catalyst for reaction. Hot ammonia gas is also present to fluidize the bed and inhibit deammonization. 
The effluent then is cooled. Ammonia and carbon dioxide in the off-gas are separated from the melamine-containing slurry. 
The slurry is further concentrated and crystallized to yield melamine.
Major manufacturers and licensors such as Orascom Construction Industries, BASF, and Eurotecnica have developed some proprietary methods.

The off-gas contains large amounts of ammonia. 
Therefore, melamine production is often integrated into urea production, which uses ammonia as feedstock.
Crystallization and washing of melamine generates a considerable amount of waste water, which may be concentrated into a solid (1.5–5% of the weight) for easier disposal. 
The solid may contain approximately 70% melamine, 23% oxytriazines (ammeline, ammelide, and cyanuric acid), 0.7% polycondensates (melem, melam, and melon).
In the Eurotecnica process, however, there is no solid waste and the contaminants are decomposed to ammonia and carbon dioxide and sent as off gas to the upstream urea plant; accordingly, the waste water can be recycled to the melamine plant itself or used as clean cooling water make-up.
Melamine reacts with acid and related compounds to form melamine cyanurate and related crystal structures, which have been implicated as contaminants or biomarkers in Chinese protein adulterations.

Drug derivatives
Melamine is part of the core structure for a number of drugs including almitrine, altretamine, cyromazine, ethylhexyl triazone, iscotrizinol, meladrazine, melarsomine, melarsoprol, tretamine, trinitrotriazine, and others.

Release to the environment of Melamine can occur from industrial use: industrial abrasion processing with low release rate (e.g. cutting of textile, cutting, machining or grinding of metal). Other release to the environment of Melamine is likely to occur from: indoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. flooring, furniture, toys, construction materials, curtains, foot-wear, leather products, paper and cardboard products, electronic equipment), outdoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. metal, wooden and plastic construction and building materials), indoor use (e.g. machine wash liquids/detergents, automotive care products, paints and coating or adhesives, fragrances and air fresheners) and outdoor use. 
Melamine can be found in complex articles, with no release intended: Vehicles (e.g. personal vehicles, delivery vans, boats, trains, metro or planes)) and vehicles. 
Melamine can be found in products with material based on: plastic (e.g. food packaging and storage, toys, mobile phones), metal used for large surface area articles (e.g. construction and building materials used for roof sheets, pipes), fabrics, textiles and apparel used for large surface area articles (e.g. construction and building materials used on the floor or walls: carpets, rugs, tapestries) and plastic used for furniture & furnishings, including furniture coverings.

IUPAC NAMES
1,3,5 - triazine - 2,4,6 - triamine
1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triamine
1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine
1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine.
1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triazine
2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazin
2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazina
2,4,6-TRIAMINO-1,3,5-TRIAZINE
2,4,6-triammino-1,3,5-triazina
Melamine
melamine
Melamine
melamine
Melamine Monomer
2,4,6-TRIAMINO-1,3,5-TRIAZINE FOR SYNTHE
1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triamine (Melamine)
MELAMINE(P)
Melamine, synthesis grade
Melamine 5g [108-78-1]
Melamine,2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazine, sym-Triaminotriazine
Melamine (250 mg) (2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazine)
1,3,5-Triazin-2,4,6-triaMine
MelaMine (1.0 Mg/10 ML in 84:16% ACN:H2O)
2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazine, sym-Triaminotriazine
Cyanuric amide
Melamine (Micronised)
MelaMine, 99% 1KG
1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-triimine
2,4,6-triamino-s-triazin
2,4,6-Triaminotriazine
Metformin EP Impurity D
Metformin Impurity 4(Metformin EP Impurity D)
Melamine (Metformin Impurity D)
MELAMINE, 99%MELAMINE, 99%MELAMINE, 99%
Melamine (Metformin EP Impurity D)
Melamine standard solution of substance
Metformin impurity D (Ph Eur)
Imp. D:melamine
2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazine for synthesis
Aero
Cyanuric triamide
cyanurictriamide
Cyanurotriamine
Cyanurtriamide
Cymel
Cynurictriamide
dg002(amine)
Hicophor pr
hicophorpr
Isomelamine
NCI-C50715
pluragard
s-Triazine, 2,4,6-triamino-
s-Triazine, 4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2-imino-
S-Triazinetriamine
Teoharn
Theoharn
Triaminotriazine
Virset 656-4
virset656-4
MELANIN
2 4 6-TRIAMINO-1 3 5-TRIAZIN
MELAMINE, 99+%
MELAMINE 99.5%
MELAMINE 99.5% GR
MELAMINEANALYTICAL STANDARD 99.8+%
MELAMINE (FINE GRIND)
TRIAMINO-S-TRIAZINE
Melamin
1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triamine
2,4,6-Triamino-1,3,5-triazine
2,4,6-Triamino-s-triazine

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