MONOETHYLENE GLYCOL

Monoethylene Glycol = MEG = Ethylene glycol

CAS Number: 107-21-1
EC Number: 203-473-3
Chemical formula: C2H6O2
Molar mass: 62.068 g·mol−1 

Monoethylene Glycol (IUPAC name: ethane-1,2-diol) is an organic compound with the formula (CH2OH)2. 
Monoethylene Glycol is mainly used for two purposes, as a raw material in the manufacture of polyester fibers and for antifreeze formulations. 
Ethylene glycol is an odorless, colorless, sweet-tasting, viscous liquid.
Monoethylene Glycol is a colorless, odorless, and slightly viscous liquid and miscible with water in all proportions. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used where high purity is required.

Monoethylene Glycol is miscible in ethanol, acetone and water.
Monoethylene Glycol is used as an inhibitor coating compound, which is a protective barrier in the form of a solid, film or fluid applied to a metallic surface to prevent corrosion. 
These barrier coatings possess chemical or physical properties that prevent corrosion reactivity and/or material degradation due to external factors.
Inhibitor coatings generate a passivation layer on the metal they protect, which prevents contact with water, chemicals and other corrosion causing materials. 
Passivation reduces the reactivity by electrochemical polarization.

Applications and Uses of Monoethylene Glycol:
Monoethylene Glycol ( MEG ) can be used for applications that require chemical intermediates for resins, solvent couplers, freezing point depression, solvents, humectants and chemical intermediates.
These applications are vital to the manufacture of a wide range of products, including resins; deicing fluids; heat transfer fluids; automotive antifreeze and coolants; water-based adhesives, latex paints and asphalt emulsions; electrolytic capacitors; textile fibers; paper and leather.
-Polyester resins ( fibers, containers and films )
-Resin esters as plasticizers ( adhesives, lacquers and enamels )
-Alkyd-type resins ( synthetic rubbers, adhesives, surface coatings )
-Stabilizer against gel formation
-Freezing point depression
-Deicing fluids ( aircraft, runway )
-Heat transfer fluids ( gas compressors, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, process chillers )
-All-weather automotive antifreeze and coolants
-Water-based formulations ( adhesives, latex paints, asphalt emulsions )
-Medium for suspending conductive salt in electrolytic capacitors
-Textile fibers
-Paper
-Leather
-Adhesives
-Glue

Monoethylene Glycol/ Ethylene Glycol (C2H6O2) is a clear, colourless, odourless, slightly viscous liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohol, and many organic compounds, and has the formula C2H6O2. 
Monoethylene Glycol is the most important of the commercially available ethylene glycols as it has many industrial applications. 
Monoethylene Glycol is produced by the oxidation of ethylene at a high temperature in the presence of a silver oxide catalyst. 
The ethylene oxide is then hydrated to yield mono ethylene glycol with di and tri ethylene glycols as co-products.

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG):
Monoethylene Glycol is the simpliest divalent alcohol. 
Monoethylene Glycol is also called ethylene glycol or just glycol.
Ethylene chlorohydrin is derived from ethylene and then hydrolyzed to form monoethylene glycol.
For industrial use, Monoethylene Glycol is produced from ethylene oxide. 
Monoethylene Glycol is a clear and sweet vicious liquid and has a hygroscopic nature. 
Monoethylene Glycol easily melts in water and alcohol and is difficult to melt in ether. 
MEG is the one of the main materials of polyethylene terephthalate, alkyd resin and synthetic fiber.

Monoethylene Glycol. Acts as a wetting agent as well as plasticizer. 
Monoethylene Glycol is obtained from the reaction of ethylene oxide and water. 
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is a clear, transparent and odorless liquid that can be mixed with water in any proportion. 
The resins produced from oleic acid and monoethylene glycol known as alkyd resins, are used frequently in the industry of paints and varnishes. 
Also used in printing inks applications.

Physical / Chemical Properties
MEG is a colorless and odorless liquid with a low vapor pressure and a sweet taste. 
MEG is fully miscible with water and when mixed in a ratio of 60:40, the resulting freezing point is -48 C.
The flash point for this product is approximately 232 ºF / 111 ºC.

Monoethylene Glycol is a vital ingredient in the production of polyester fibres, films, and resins, one of which is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). 
PET is used for making of plastic bottles. 
Ethylene Glycol has renowned antifreeze applications, being a major component in the manufacture of antifreeze, coolants, and de-icing liquids. 
Humectant properties make Monoethylene Glycol ideal for use in the fibre treatment of textiles, pulp and paper industry, in adhesives, inks, and cellophane. 
Monoethylene Glycol is also a used as a dehydration agent in natural gas pipelines, inhibiting the formation of natural gas clathrates before being recovered from the gas and reused.

Uses of Monoethylene Glycol.
Coolant and heat-transfer agent
The major use of ethylene glycol is as an antifreeze agent in the coolant in for example, automobiles and air-conditioning systems that either place the chiller or air handlers outside or must cool below the freezing temperature of water. 
In geothermal heating/cooling systems, ethylene glycol is the fluid that transports heat through the use of a geothermal heat pump. 
The ethylene glycol either gains energy from the source (lake, ocean, water well) or dissipates heat to the sink, depending on whether the system is being used for heating or cooling.

Pure ethylene glycol has a specific heat capacity about one half that of water. 
So, while providing freeze protection and an increased boiling point, ethylene glycol lowers the specific heat capacity of water mixtures relative to pure water. 
A 1:1 mix by mass has a specific heat capacity of about 3140 J/(kg·°C) (0.75 BTU/(lb·°F)), three quarters that of pure water, thus requiring increased flow rates in same-system comparisons with water. 
The formation of large bubbles in cooling passages of internal combustion engines will severely inhibit heat flow (flux) from the area, so that allowing nucleation (tiny bubbles) to occur is not advisable. 
Large bubbles in cooling passages will be self-sustaining or grow larger, with a virtually complete loss of cooling in the area. 
With pure MEG (mono-ethylene glycol) the hot spot will reach 200 °C (392 °F). 
Cooling by other effects such as air draft from fans (not considered in pure nucleation analysis) will assist in preventing large-bubble formation.

The mixture of ethylene glycol with water provides additional benefits to coolant and antifreeze solutions, such as preventing corrosion and acid degradation, as well as inhibiting the growth of most microbes and fungi.
Mixtures of ethylene glycol and water are sometimes informally referred to in industry as glycol concentrates, compounds, mixtures, or solutions.
Ethylene glycol, also known as monoethylene glycol or MEG, is an odorless, colorless, hygroscopic liquid. 
Not only does Monoethylene Glycol exhibit low volatility and low viscosity, but Monoethylene Glycol is also fully miscible in water and many other organic liquids. 
Because of the reactivity of the hydroxyl group and the high degree of solubility, ethylene glycol provides a broad range of applications. 
Besides serving as an intermediate to chemical synthesis, Monoethylene Glycol can produce resins, act as a solvent, and lower the freezing point of water, lending its efficacy as an anti-freeze.

Anti-freeze
Pure ethylene glycol freezes at about −12 °C (10.4 °F) but, when mixed with water, the mixture freezes at a lower temperature. 
For example, a mixture of 60% ethylene glycol and 40% water freezes at −45 °C (−49 °F).
Diethylene glycol behaves similarly. 
The freezing point depression of some mixtures can be explained as a colligative property of solutions but, in highly concentrated mixtures such as the example, deviations from ideal solution behavior are expected due to the influence of intermolecular forces. 
Monoethylene Glycol's important to note that though pure and distilled water will have a greater specific heat capacity than any mixture of antifreeze and water, commercial antifreezes also typically contain an anti-corrosive additive to prevent pure water from corroding coolant passages in the engine block, cylinder head(s), water pump and radiator. 
Monoethylene Glycol is for this reason that even in areas that do not see freezing temperatures a mixture of 1:1 distilled water to 50/50 antifreeze (resulting in a 3:1 water to antifreeze ratio) is suggested as a rule of thumb.

There is a difference in the mixing ratio, depending on whether Monoethylene Glycol is ethylene glycol or propylene glycol. 
For ethylene glycol, the mixing ratios are typically 30/70 and 35/65, whereas the propylene glycol mixing ratios are typically 35/65 and 40/60. 
Monoethylene Glycol is important that the mixture be frost-proof at the lowest operating temperature.
Because of the depressed freezing temperatures, ethylene glycol is used as a de-icing fluid for windshields and aircraft, as an antifreeze in automobile engines, and as a component of vitrification (anticrystallization) mixtures for low-temperature preservation of biological tissues and organs.

The use of ethylene glycol not only depresses the freezing point of aqueous mixtures, but also elevates their boiling point. 
This results in the operating temperature range for heat-transfer fluids being broadened on both ends of the temperature scale. 
The increase in boiling temperature is due to pure ethylene glycol having a much higher boiling point and lower vapor pressure than pure water, as is typical with most binary mixtures of volatile liquids.

Precursor to polymers
In the plastic industry, ethylene glycol is an important precursor to polyester fibers and resins. 
Polyethylene terephthalate, used to make plastic bottles for soft drinks, is prepared from ethylene glycol.

Other uses
Dehydrating agent
Ethylene glycol is used in the natural gas industry to remove water vapor from natural gas before further processing, in much the same manner as triethylene glycol (TEG).

Hydrate inhibition
Because of Monoethylene Glycols high boiling point and affinity for water, ethylene glycol is a useful desiccant. 
Ethylene glycol is widely used to inhibit the formation of natural gas clathrates (hydrates) in long multiphase pipelines that convey natural gas from remote gas fields to a gas processing facility. Ethylene glycol can be recovered from the natural gas and reused as an inhibitor after purification treatment that removes water and inorganic salts.

Natural gas is dehydrated by ethylene glycol. 
In this application, ethylene glycol flows down from the top of a tower and meets a rising mixture of water vapor and hydrocarbon gases. 
Dry gas exits from the top of the tower. 
The glycol and water are separated, and the glycol recycled. 
Instead of removing water, ethylene glycol can also be used to depress the temperature at which hydrates are formed. 
The purity of glycol used for hydrate suppression (monoethylene glycol) is typically around 80%, whereas the purity of glycol used for dehydration (triethylene glycol) is typically 95 to more than 99%. 
Moreover, the injection rate for hydrate suppression is much lower than the circulation rate in a glycol dehydration tower.

Applications
Minor uses of ethylene glycol include the manufacture of capacitors, as a chemical intermediate in the manufacture of 1,4-dioxane, as an additive to prevent corrosion in liquid cooling systems for personal computers, and inside the lens devices of cathode-ray tube type of rear projection televisions. 
Ethylene glycol is also used in the manufacture of some vaccines, but Monoethylene Glycol is not itself present in these injections. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used as a minor (1–2%) ingredient in shoe polish and also in some inks and dyes. 
Ethylene glycol has seen some use as a rot and fungal treatment for wood, both as a preventative and a treatment after the fact. 
Monoethylene Glycol has been used in a few cases to treat partially rotted wooden objects to be displayed in museums. 
Monoethylene Glycol is one of only a few treatments that are successful in dealing with rot in wooden boats, and is relatively cheap. 
Ethylene glycol may also be one of the minor ingredients in screen cleaning solutions, along with the main ingredient isopropyl alcohol. 
Ethylene glycol is commonly used as a preservative for biological specimens, especially in secondary schools during dissection as a safer alternative to formaldehyde. 
Monoethylene Glycol is also used as part of the water-based hydraulic fluid used to control subsea oil and gas production equipment.

Ethylene glycol is used as a protecting group in organic synthesis to protect carbonyl compounds such as ketones and aldehydes.
Silicon dioxide reacts in heated reflux under dinitrogen with ethylene glycol and an alkali metal base to produce highly reactive, pentacoordinate silicates which provide access to a wide variety of new silicon compounds.
The silicates are essentially insoluble in all polar solvent except methanol.
Monoethylene Glycol also can be used in vaccine manufacture or as a formaldehyde substitute when preserving biological specimens.

Mono-ethylene Glycol (MEG) can be used for applications that require chemical intermediates for resins, solvent couplers, freezing point depression, solvents, humectants and chemical intermediates. 
These applications are vital to the manufacture of a wide range of products, including resins; deicing fluids; heat transfer fluids; automotive antifreeze and coolants; water-based adhesives, latex paints and asphalt emulsions; electrolytic capacitors; textile fibers; paper and leather.

Chemical reactions
Ethylene glycol is used as a protecting group for carbonyl groups in organic synthesis. 
Treating a ketone or aldehyde with ethylene glycol in the presence of an acid catalyst (e.g., p-toluenesulfonic acid; BF3·Et2O) gives the corresponding a 1,3-dioxolane, which is resistant to bases and other nucleophiles. 
The 1,3-dioxolane protecting group can thereafter be removed by further acid hydrolysis.
In this example, isophorone was protected using ethylene glycol with p-toluenesulfonic acid in moderate yield. 
Water was removed by azeotropic distillation to shift the equilibrium to the right.

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is a liquid, colorless daughter product of ethylene oxide which originates by adding water. 
Monoethylene Glycol`s most important areas of application are the production of PET bottles as well as polyester fibers for functional sports and casual wear and also for polyester resins. 
You can find MEG in the automotive industry as engine coolants, as lubricants for moving parts in cooling systems, as additives in electrolytic polishing belts and as a component for flame resistant hydraulic fluids.

Monoethylene Glycol is a transparent and slightly sticky liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is practically odorless. 
Monoethylene Glycol mixes with water, alcohols and numerous other organic compounds.

Method of obtaining
The method of producing monoethylene glycol which is most commonly used is the hydrolysis of ethylene oxide.

Applications of Monoethylene Glycol:
Monoethylene Glycol is used in antifreezes for engine coolers and in cooling systems as an component.
Monoethylene Glycol is also used to produce polyester and alkyd resins and synthetic fibers, and also solvents, plastifiers and explosives.

Storage and transport
Monoethylene Glycol is most commonly stored in stainless steel or aluminum tanks.

CAS No. 107-21-1
Chemical Name: MONO ETHYLENE GLCOL
Other Names:
MEG
Ethylene Glycol
1,2-dihydroxyethane
1,2-ethanediol

Production of Monoethylene Glycol:
Industrial routes
Ethylene glycol is produced from ethylene (ethene), via the intermediate ethylene oxide. 
Ethylene oxide reacts with water to produce ethylene glycol according to the chemical equation:
C2H4O + H2O → HO−CH2CH2−OH
This reaction can be catalyzed by either acids or bases, or can occur at neutral pH under elevated temperatures. 
The highest yields of ethylene glycol occur at acidic or neutral pH with a large excess of water. 
Under these conditions, ethylene glycol yields of 90% can be achieved. 
The major byproducts are the oligomers diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol, and tetraethylene glycol. 
The separation of these oligomers and water is energy-intensive. 
About 6.7 million tonnes are produced annually.

A higher selectivity is achieved by use of Shell's OMEGA process. 
In the OMEGA process, the ethylene oxide is first converted with carbon dioxide (CO2) to ethylene carbonate. 
This ring is then hydrolyzed with a base catalyst in a second step to produce mono-ethylene glycol in 98% selectivity.
The carbon dioxide is released in this step again and can be fed back into the process circuit. 
The carbon dioxide comes in part from the ethylene oxide production, where a part of the ethylene is completely oxidized.

Ethylene glycol is produced from carbon monoxide in countries with large coal reserves and less stringent environmental regulations. 
The oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl oxalate provides a promising approach to the production of C1-based ethylene glycol.

Chemical Intermediate for Resins 
• Polyester resins (fibers, containers and films)
• Resin esters as plasticizers (adhesives, lacquers and enamels)
• Alkyd-type resins (synthetic rubbers, adhesives,
• surface coatings)

Solvent Coupler 
• Stabilizer against gel formation
• Freezing Point Depression
• Deicing fluids
• Heat transfer fluids (gas compressors, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, process chillers, ice rinks)
• All-weather automotive antifreeze and coolants
• Water-based formulations (adhesives, latex paints, asphalt emulsions)

Solvent 
• Medium for suspending conductive salt in electrolytic capacitors

Humectant 
• Textile fibers
• Paper
• Leather
• Adhesives
• Glue

Chemical Intermediate 
• Solvents

Uses of Monoethylene Glycol:
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is an important raw material for industrial applications. 
MEG is utilized in the manufacture of polyester (PET) resins, films, fibers, antifreezes, coolants, aircraft anti-icer and deicers and solvents.
Monoethylene Glycol is also utilised as raw material for paper industry, polyester Resins, adhesives and inks, chemical Intermediates, Heat Transfer, Fluids.
Monoethylene Glycol is also a used as a dehydration agent in natural gas pipelines where Monoethylene Glycol inhibits the formation of natural gas clathrates.

Chemical Formula: HOCH2CH2OH
CAS Number: 107-21-1
Molar Weight: 62,07 g/mol
Melting Point: -12,9 °C
Boiling Point: 197,6 °C

MEG is also used in antifreeze / coolant applications, precursor to polymer, dehydrating agent and also as hydrate inhibition in natural gas treatment and in polyurethane and poliol, in polyester resin and in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.
Monoethylene Glycol (Ethylene glycol) is a colorless, virtually odorless and slightly viscous liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols, aldehydes and many organic compounds. 
MEG will not dissolve rubber, cellulose acetate or heavy vegetable and petroleum oils. 
MEG has a low volatility and Monoethylene Glycol is 50% more hygroscopic than glycerol at room temperature.

Monoethylene Glycol Uses and Applications
Mono ethylene glycol, commonly referred to as EG, ethylene glycol, or MEG, is the largest volume product of all ethylene glycols. 
Mono ethylene glycol is available in four grades: polyester, high purity, industrial and antifreeze.
Polyester grade mono ethylene glycol is used in the manufacture of polyester fibers and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) resins which are used in the production of products such as textiles, tire cords, videotapes, and soft drink and water containers. 
Polyester mono ethylene glycol meets the highest quality standards.
High purity and industrial grade mono ethylene glycol is used in a variety of applications requiring good solvent, hygroscopic or high boiling point characteristics, such as paints, printing inks, hydraulic fluids, cleaners, heat transfer fluids and electronics.
Antifreeze grade mono ethylene glycol is a major component in automotive engine coolants.

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is one of the most commonly used reagents for hydrate inhibition in production pipelines. 
Monoethylene Glycol is recovered and reinjected to minimize the operating and environmental costs associated with MEG replacement and disposal.

Physical characteristic: Colorless, Odorless Liquid
Chemical formula: C2H6O2
Molecular weight: 62,07g/mol

Properties: Typical Value
Form: Clear liquid
Appearance: Colourless
Odour: Odourless
CAS No.: 107-21-1
Monoethylene Glycol Content: 99.5% min.
Solubility: Completely soluble with water

Monoethylene Glycol is a non-volatile, colorless and hygroscopic liquid that can be dissolved in water, acetone and alcohol. 
Monoethylene Glycol has a low freezing point and a high boiling point. 
That is why Monoethylene Glycol has many areas of usage.

Monoethylene Glycol inhibited is a transparent fluid that can be mixed with water and widely used as antifreeze in secondary refrigerant circuits. 
Monoethylene Glycol can be adapted to various applications. 
Monoethylene Glycol is formulated with quality products and special corrosion inhibitors for plant protection.

Areas of usage:
Monoethylene Glycol is used in the production of polyester fibre, PET resin, surface coatings, alkyd and unsaturated polyester.
Monoethylene Glycol is used as antifreeze in the automotive sector.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in the textile industry.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in the cosmetics industry.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in medicine production.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in coolant production.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in the production of brake liquids.
Monoethylene Glycol is used in the production of paint, varnish and ink.

What is Monoethylene Glycol?
Monoethylene Glycol (also known as MEG) is a clear, colourless, virtually odourless, and slightly viscous liquid.  
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols and many organic compounds, Monoethylene Glycol has the formula C2H6O2.  
Monoethylene Glycol is the most important of the commercially available ethylene glycols as Monoethylene Glycol has many industrial applications.

What can i use MEG for?
Anti-freezing and anti-icing additive
Humidifying and plasticizing
Dehydrating
Coupling printing inks
Textile conditioning
Solvent for dyes in textile and leather finishing
Agricultural formulation
General purpose cleaners
Explosives manufacture
Electrolytic component
Humectant
Water-based coating
Preservative, rust remover and disinfectant

Monoethylene Glycol Application Areas:
-Chemical Intermediate
-Solvents
-Polyester resins
-Resin esters as plasticizers
-Alkyd-type resins

Humectant
-Textile fibers
-Paper
-Leather
-Adhesives
-Glue

Solvent Coupler
-Stabilizer against gel formation
-Freezing Point Depression
-Deicing fluids
-Heat transfer fluids (gas compressors, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, process chillers, ice rinks)
-All-weather automotive antifreeze and coolants
-Water-based formulations (adhesives, latex paints, asphalt emulsions)

CAS Number: 107-21-1
3DMet: B00278
Abbreviations: MEG
Beilstein Reference: 505945    
CHEBI:30742 
ChEMBL: ChEMBL457299
ChemSpider: 13835235 
ECHA InfoCard: 100.003.159
EC Number: 203-473-3
Gmelin Reference: 943
KEGG: C01380 
MeSH: Ethylene+glycol
PubChem CID: 174
RTECS number: KW2975000
UNII: FC72KVT52F 
UN number: 3082
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID8020597

Monoethylene Glycol is manufactured in a 2-step reaction process. 
First, ethylene is reacted with oxygen to form ethylene oxide. 
Second, ethylene oxide is reacted with water to form Monoethylene Glycol (MEG).
MEG is typically produced to a high level of purity (99%).

Product Uses
MEG is used as a feedstock for manufacturing polyester polymers. 
Monoethylene Glycol is also used in the formulation of antifreeze products.

Physical / Chemical Properties
Mono ethylene glycol is a colorless, odorless, and slightly viscous liquid, more hygroscopic than glycerol and miscible with water in all proportions. 
The flash point for mono ethylene glycol is 111°C (232°F). 
The boiling point and freezing points are 197°C (387°F) and -13°C (8.6°F) respectively.

WHAT IS MONOETHYLENE GLYCOL
Monoethylene Glycol can be used as an intermediate in the production of solvents and resins or as a building block in PET to produce fibers. 
Furthermore, MEG is commonly used as a raw material for antifreeze fluids and also in O&G and Agriculture

MONO ETHYLENE GLYCOL(MEG) is an essential raw material for polyester. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used in latex based paint formulation. 
These Glycols are also used to produce resins for coatings, adhesives, and paints. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used as an active ingredient in engine coolants and antifreeze. 
Monoethylene Glycol is offered in Technical and Laboratory Grade. 
Monoethanolamine is available in the form of Colourless Liquid packed in 230 kg Drum. 
We can offer Monoethylene Glycol in many grades as per the application needs in different industry sectors.

Synonyms: MEG 1, 2-Ethanediol, Monoethylene Glycol
INCI: Monoethylene Glycol
Chemical Formula: HOCH2CH2OH
CAS Number: 107-21-1

Monoethylene Glycol (also known as MEG) is a clear, colourless, virtually odourless, and slightly viscous liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols, and many organic compounds, and has the formula C2H6O2. 
Monoethylene Glycol is the most important of the commercially available ethylene glycols as Monoethylene Glycol has many industrial applications.
Substance name:ethylene glycol
Trade name:Monoethyleneglycol
EC no:203-473-3
CAS no:107-21-1
HS code:29053100
Formula:C2H6O2

Monoethylene Glycol is elevating as an ideal solution in a wide variety of antifreeze formulations, specifically for automobile radiators.
Hence, Monoethylene Glycol is well-known as an active anti-freezing agent. 
In general, the ethylene glycol products are mainly utilized in coolants, chemical intermediates, heat transfer fluids, polyester resins, and solvents. 
In addition to this, MEG is also useful in gas dehydration and treating. 
MEG is an essential raw material, which is highly preferred by the market players mainly for industrial applications such as for making polyester resins, fibers, and films. 
Many advantages of ethylene glycol are attracting industry players. 
These advantages are low volatility and low boiling point.

What is Monoethylene Glycol – Fibre?
Mono ethylene glycol (also known as MEG, EG, 1,2-ethanediol or 1,2-Dihydroxyethane) is an organic compound with the formula C2H6O2. 
Monoethylene Glycol is a slightly viscous liquid with a clear, colourless appearance and a sweet taste that emits virtually no odour. 
Monoethylene Glycol’s miscible with water, alcohols, and many other organic compounds and is primarily used in the industry for manufacturing polyester fibres and as a component in the production of antifreeze, coolants, aircraft anti-icers and de-icers.

Chemical formula: C2H6O2
Molar mass: 62.068 g·mol−1
Appearance: Clear, colorless liquid
Odor: Odorless
Density: 1.1132 g/cm3
Melting point: −12.9 °C (8.8 °F; 260.2 K)
Boiling point: 197.3 °C (387.1 °F; 470.4 K)
Solubility in water: Miscible
Solubility: Soluble in most organic solvents
log P: -1.69
Vapor pressure: 0.06 mmHg (20 °C)
Viscosity: 1.61×10−2 Pa·s

Monoethylene Glycol is a colourless, oily liquid produced commercially from ethylene oxide. 
Monoethylene Glycol is widely used as antifreeze in automobile cooling systems and in the manufacture of man-made fibres, low-freezing explosives, and brake fluid.
Ethylene glycol is used as a classic industrial antifreeze. 
Our products differ in particular in their additive packages, which affect the service life of the system and the heat transfer.

Ethylene glycol is viscous at room temperature. 
Monoethylene Glycol is colorless, odorless, and sweet-tasting. 
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible in water in all ratios.
Monoethylene Glycol is one of the main raw materials for polyethylene terephthalate (PET resin). 
Monoethylene Glycol is widely used for automotive antifreeze solutions because the freezing point is low, toxicity is low, and Monoethylene Glycol is completely miscible in water.
CAS: No. 107-21-1
EINECS: No. 203-473-3

What is Mono-Ethylene Glycol (MEG)?
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) or ethylene glycol is one of the important commercially available glycol. 
Monoethylene Glycol is produced industrially from ethylene or ethylene oxide. 
In this process of manufacturing MEG two co-products are obtained, diethylene glycol (DEG) and triethylene glycol (TEG).
Monoethylene Glycol is an important raw material for the number of industrial applications including manufacturing of polyester fiber, fabrics and polyethylene terephthalate used to manufacture bottles. 
Other industrial uses comprise of being used as a coolant, heat transfer agents, antifreeze and also as a hydrate inhibitor in gas pipelines.

Technical Properties
Chemical and physical properties of mono ethylene glycol:
Molecular Formula: C2H6O2 / (CH2OH)2 / HOCH2CH2OH
Cas Number: 107-21-1
Molecular Mass: 62.07 g/mol
Exact Mass: 62.036779 g/mol
Flashpoint: 232 °F/ 111.11 °C
Boiling Point: 387.7 °F / 197.6 °C at 760 mm Hg
Melting Point: 9 ° F / -12.8 °C
Vapour Pressure: 0.06 mm Hg at 68 °F / 20 °C
Water Solubility: Miscible
Density: 1.115 at 68 °F

PRESENTATION:
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is a colorless, practically odorless and viscous liquid organic compound.
Monoethylene Glycol has a sweetish taste and is miscible in water, alcohol, ether, acetone, and ethylene glycol.

APPLICATIONS:
Monoethylene Glycol is primarily used as a raw material in the manufacture of polyester fibers and fabric industry and polyethylene terephthalate resins (PET) used in bottling. 
A small percent is also used in other applications such as antifreeze formulations and other products.

Product Benefits
High performance industrial antifreeze based on MEG
Extreme temperature protection down to -50oC
Miscible with water in all proportions
Versatile, suitable for a wide range of applications

Monoethylene Glycol is raw material in the manufacture of polyester fiber and fabric industry.
Monoethylene Glycol is also used in industrial applications like antifreeze formulations and other industrial products.
Monoethylene Glycol is an odorless, colorless, syrupy, hygroscopic, sweet-tasting liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol also can reduce the freezing points for water, and is miscible in water, alcohol, acetone.

Ethylene glycol is a colorless, practically odorless, low-volatility, low-viscosity, hygroscopic liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is completely miscible with water and many organic liquids. ,
Ethylene glycol is produced from ethylene, via the intermediate ethylene oxide. 
Ethylene oxide reacts with water to produce ethylene glycol. 
Ethylene glycol (Monoethylene Glycol) in Monoethylene Glycols pure form, Monoethylene Glycol is an odorless, colorless, syrupy liquid with a sweet taste.

Monoethylene Glycol Uses
Polyester fiber
Antifreeze
Unsaturated polyester resin
Electronic grade etching solvent

Monoethylene Glycol Applications
- in the manufacture of antifreeze (coolant)
- as an ingredient of deicing compositions used in the aviation
- included in the hydraulic fluids and quenching
- for the production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
- as an intermediate in the preparation of 1,4-dioxane, diethylene glycol and other oligomers of ethylene glycol
- as a drying agent for gases
- for the production of alkyd resins and polyurethane

Monoethylene Glycol Properties
Physical state:    Liquid
Colour: Clear very pale straw
Odour: Mild
pH: 6.5 – 8.5
Relative density: 1.115
Boiling point: 198oC (initial)

Other Known Names: 1,2-ethanediol, glycol, ethylene alcohol
Molecular Formula: C2H6O2
Applications: coolant and antifreeze, cosmetics, adhesives, leather dyeing, tobacco, foam stabilizer

Monoethylene Glycol Applications    
Polyethylene terephthalate, polyester, PET bottles, antifreeze solutions

Monoethylene Glycol Usage Regulations    
Applicable Laws: Japan, Fire Service Law

Available volume specifications    
Tanker truckload (lorry), drum, oil can, ship (bulk).

DESCRIPTION:
Monoethylene Glycol is a clear, colorless and hygroscopic liquid, with moderately viscous. 
Monoethylene Glycol is completely miscible with water and many organic liquids.

APPLICATION:
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is most commonly used as chemical intermediate in the manufacture of polyester resins and textile fibers. 
MEG is also wildly used as automotive antifreeze due to Monoethylene Glycols low freezing point when mixed with water and used as heat transfer fluids for ventilation and air-conditioning systems.

How is Monoethylene Glycol produced?
Mono ethylene glycol is produced industrially using ethylene oxide via hydrolysis. 
Ethylene oxide is obtained through oxidation and is then reacted with water to give mono ethylene glycol with di and tri ethylene glycols as co-products:
C2H4O + H2O → HOCH2CH2OH
Mono ethylene glycol is also manufactured via the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate in the presence of a copper catalyst or via the acetoxylation of ethylene.

Monoethylene Glycol also known as MEG is a clear, colourless, virtually odourless, and slightly viscous liquid.  
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols, and many organic compounds, and has the molecular formula C2H6O2, CAS: 107-21-1. 
Monoethylene Glycol has a specific gravity of 1.115 and a flash point of 110 °C.

Monoethylene Glycol, also known as MEG or ethylene glycol is a viscous, colourless and odourless dihydroxy alcohol. 
Monoethylene Glycol can be made from a number of raw materials but is mainly produced from ethylene via ethylene oxide which is then hydrated through thermal or catalytic processes.

Monethylene Glycol uses and applications:
Monoethylene Glycol is widely used as an antifreeze in closed circuit systems where Monoethylene Glycol possesses the ability to lower the freezing temperature of water. 
Monoethylene Glycolis also commonly used in heat transfer fluids as a coolant for compressors, heating/ventilating systems and air conditioning units.

In most cooling / closed circuit systems, however, Monoethylene Glycol is often necessary to mix monoethylene glycol with an inhibitor to reduce the risk of corrosion. 
If you have this requirement, along with the need for a blue dye additive our MonCool Ethylene Glycol E860 is recommended.
Other uses of MEG include as a raw material in the production of a range of products including polyethylene terephthalate (PET) resin, polyester, fiberglass and inks.

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is a gas hydrate inhibitor. 
The large amounts used in gas field industry impose the need for MEG regeneration. 
During this process the water–MEG mixture is heated at low pressure to remove most of the water. 
Monoethylene Glycol is important to know the carbon dioxide equilibria under MEG regeneration conditions to prevent problems related to mineral precipitation and scale formation. 
The equilibrium amount of total CO2 in solution was therefore examined in water–MEG solutions at typical MEG regeneration conditions [(50 to 98) % wt MEG, (80 to 140) °C, (50 or 100) mmol·kg–1 total alkalinity]. 
A CO2/N2 mixture of known composition (0.200 % or 0.050 % mol CO2) controlled the CO2 pressure in the reaction vessel. 
Discoloration was observed in some experiments, and ion chromatography showed that glycolic and formic acids were the dominating MEG degradation products. 
Data for the total CO2 concentration at equilibrium are reported together with a discussion describing why common acid titration is still a valid analysis method although significant amounts of organic acids were present.

Preferred IUPAC name
Ethane-1,2-diol
Other names
Ethylene glycol
1,2-Ethanediol
Ethylene alcohol
Hypodicarbonous acid
Monoethylene Glycol
1,2-Dihydroxyethane

Mono ethylene glycol (MEG) is a colourless, odourless, stable liquid with a high boiling point and low viscosity.
Monoethylene Glycol is a member of a homologous series of dihydroxyalcohols.

Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols, aldehydes and most organic compounds. 
Monoethylene Glycols chemical properties are similar to those of di ethylene glycol (DEG) and tri ethylene glycol (TEG) with some slight differences in viscosity, hygroscopicity and boiling point. 
Monoethylene Glycol is produced by the hydration of ethylene oxide.

Molar Mass: 62.07 g/mol
Density: 1.1132 g/cm3
Melting Point: -12.9°C

MEG as a drying agent / Desiccant
Because of its high boiling point and affinity for water, ethylene glycol is a useful desiccant.

Instead of removing water, ethylene glycol can also be used to depress the temperature at which hydrates are formed. 
The purity of glycol used for hydrate suppression (mono-ethylene glycol) is typically around 80%, whereas the purity of glycol used for dehydration (tri-ethylene glycol) is typically 95-99+%. 
Moreover, the injection rate for hydrate suppression is much lower than the circulation rate in a glycol dehydration tower.

Other applications for MEG
As an additive to prevent corrosion in liquid cooling systems for computers
In the manufacture of some vaccines
Monoethylene Glycol is used as a minor ingredient in shoe polish and also in some inks and dyes.
Ethylene glycol has seen some use as a rot and fungal treatment for wood, both as a preventative and a treatment. 
Often Monoethylene Glycol is used as acarrier for boric acid and borax in woodworm treatments and wet/dry rot treatments.
Mixed with isopropyl alcohol Monoethylene Glycol is used for cleaning mirrors, glass, lenses and screens.
Ethylene glycol is commonly used as a preservative for specimens in schools during dissection.

Properties of MEG
Synonyms: Ethane-1,2-diol; 1,2-Ethanediol; Glycol; Ethylene Alcohol; Hypodicarbonous acid; Monoethylene Glycol;
CAS NO: 107-21-1
EINECS: 203-473-3
Mol formula: C2H6O2
Mol mass: 62.07 g/mol
Appearance: clear liquid
Distillation BP: 197oC
Melting point: -12.9oC
Flash Point: 111oC
Autoignition temperature: 410oC

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is a viscous (concentrated) and highly toxic liquid that is commonly used for two purposes: 
1) production of polyester fibers and 2) production of antifreeze.
Monoethylene Glycol is a pure, colorless, odorless and toxic liquid with a sweet taste.
Ethylene glycol disrupts hydrogen when dissolved in water. 
Pure ethylene glycol cools to about -12 ° C, but when mixed with water, the mixture does not crystallize easily and therefore the freezing point of the mixture is reduced. 
Specifically, a mixture of 60% ethylene glycol and 40% water freezes at -45 ° C.
Applications of monoethylene glycol
• Used as a raw material for the preparation of polymers such as polyesters and polyethylene terephthalates
• Application in antifreeze formulations in cars
• Application as a cooling and heat transfer facilitator in air conditioning systems
• Preventing water freezing inside chillers and cooling equipment in industries
• Used as a dehydrating compound to remove water molecules from natural gas
Use of monoethylene glycol to synthesize some carbonyl organic compounds
• Application in rubber industry
• Used in the production of polymer resins

Monoethylene Glycol Physical and chemical properties
• Iupac name: Ethane-1 and 2-diol
Common names: Monoethylene Glycol, Ethylene glycol, 1-2-ethane diol, Ethylene alcohol, 1-2-dihydroxyethane
Chemical formula: C2H6O2
• Mole mass: 62.07 grams per mole
Density: 1.1132 grams per cubic centimeter
• Viscosity: 0.00161 mm Hg
Melting point: 12.9 ° C
Boiling point: 197.3 ° C
Flammability: 111 ° C
• Vapor pressure: 0.06 mm Hg
Similar compounds: diethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol and triethylene glycol
Study methods: IR, NMR, MS and UV spectroscopy methods

Safety information and storage conditions
According to the information in the safety sheet and chemical considerations of monoethylene glycol, regarding the use of toxic organic compounds, Monoethylene Glycol is very important to pay attention to the following:
Ethylene glycol contains highly toxic vapors. 
Tennessee vapors cause poisoning.
The flash point of ethylene glycol is 111 ° C, so never store packages containing Monoethylene Glycol in the vicinity of heat or sources of ignition and fire.
• Keep monoethylene glycol barrels away from containers and containers containing acids or other active chemical compounds such as alkalis and oxidants.
• The warehouse should have strong and proper ventilation.
• All people dealing with ethylene glycol should wear special work clothes, glasses, masks and gloves.
• Ethylene glycol storage containers must have a safety information label.
• Ethylene glycol containers and barrels should always be tightly closed.
Prolonged exposure to monoethylene glycol can have devastating effects on the kidneys, liver, and nervous system.
• This substance can greatly irritate the skin, eyes and respiratory system

Mono Ethylene glycol in its pure form, Monoethylene Glycol is an odorless, colorless, syrupy liquid with a sweet taste. 
Mono Ethylene glycol is produced from ethylene, via the intermediate ethylene oxide. 
Ethylene oxide reacts with water to produce ethylene glycol according to the chemical equation. 
The major byproducts are the diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol, and poly glycol.
Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is an important raw material for industrial applications. 
A primary use of MEG is in the manufacture of polyester (PET) resins, films and fibers. 
In addition, MEG is important in the production of antifreezes, coolants, aircraft anti-icer and deicers and solvents.

What Does Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) Mean?
Monoethylene Glycol is a chemical substance that is produced by the reaction of ethylene or ethylene oxide. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used as a corrosion inhibitor in antifreeze and in coolants, and in the manufacturing of polyester.

Type of polyol that is obtained by hydration of ethylene oxide and is a petrochemical product. 
Monoethylene Glycol is widely used in making of alkyd and polyester resins. 
Also widely used in closed circuit anti-freeze solutions.
Chemical name: Ethane-1,2-diol

History of Mono-Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene Glycol was first prepared by a French chemist Charles-Adolphe Wurtz from ethylene glycol via saponification in the year 1859. 
Later, The United States started semi-commercial production of ethylene glycol via ethylene chlorohydrination in the year 1917.
The first large commercial plant for manufacturing Ethylene glycol was set up at South Charleston by Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Co. in the year 1925.

How is Mono-Ethylene Glycol (MEG) Produced?
MEG is produced from ethylene, via the intermediate ethylene oxide. 
In this process, ethylene oxide reacts with water to produce ethylene glycol according to the desired chemical equation.  
This process is catalyzed by using acids, bases or can even occur at the acidic or neutral level of pH under elevated temperatures.
The highest amount of Ethylene Glycol can be derived at acidic or neutral pH with an excess amount of water. 
Approximately 90% of ethylene glycol can be achieved under these conditions. 
Prominent by-products of this process are- triethylene glycol, tetramethylene glycol, and oligomers diethylene glycol.

Formula: HOCH2CH2OH
Molecular mass: 62.1
Boiling point: 197°C
Melting point: -13°C
Relative density (water = 1): 1.1
Solubility in water: miscible
Vapour pressure, Pa at 20°C: 6.5
Relative vapour density (air = 1): 2.1
Relative density of the vapour/air-mixture at 20°C (air = 1): 1.00
Flash point: 111.11°C c.c., 115°C o.c.
Auto-ignition temperature: 398°C
Explosive limits, vol% in air: 3.2-15.3
Octanol/water partition coefficient as log Pow: -1.36
Viscosity: 21 mPa*s at 20°C 

Applications of Monoethylene Glycol
Mono ethylene glycol, like other glycols, is used widely in industry because of its high boiling point and Monoethylene Glycols solvent and other useful properties including hygroscopicity, non-corrosiveness, freeze point depression, lubricating and plasticizing properties. 
Monoethylene Glycol reacts readily, making Monoethylene Glycol a popular intermediate for making a number of esters.

Mono ethylene glycol is an important raw material in many industrial applications including the production of polyester fibres, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics, coolants in antifreeze, and resins. 
Monoethylene Glycols hygroscopic properties also make Monoethylene Glycol ideal for use in the treatment of fibres, paper, adhesives, printing inks, leather and cellophane.

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) is an organic compound widely used as an antifreeze for the automotive trade and a precursor to polymers. 
In Monoethylene Glycols pure form, Monoethylene Glycol is an odourless, colourless, hygroscopic, low-viscosity liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is completely miscible with water in all proportions. 
The diverse chemistry of ethylene glycol allows Monoethylene Glycol to be used in the laboratory or in industry for a wide range of reactions.

MEG as a coolant and heat transfer agent
The major use of ethylene glycol is as a medium for convective heat transfer in, for example,cars and liquid cooled computers. 
Ethylene glycol is also commonly used in chilled water air conditioning systems that place either the chiller or air handlers outside, or systems that must cool below the freezing temperature of water. 
In geothermal heating/cooling systems, ethylene glycol is the liquid that transports heat through the use of a geothermal heat pump.

Due to Monoethylene Glycols low freezing point ethylene glycol resists freezing. 
The freezing point of a mixture of 60% ethylene glycol and 40% water freezes below -45 oC. 
Monoethylene Glycol is used as a deicing fluid for windscreens and aircraft.

Property (Unit) Typical Value
Apprearance Essentially free of suspended matter
Monoethylene Glycol, wt. % min. 99.0
Diethylene glycol, wt. % max. 0.5
Color ( APHA ) max. 10
Acidity [ as acetic acid ], wt. % max. 0.005
Chlorides ( as CI ), ppm max. 0.1
Iron, ppm max. 0.10
Water, wt. % max. 0.10
Water solubility at 25°C Miscible in all proportions
Molecular weight 62.07
Boiling point at 760 mm Hg, °C 197.6
Freezing point, °C -13
Flash point ( PMCC ), °C 126.7
Specific gravity at 20/20 °C 1.1154
Specific heat at 20 °C, cal/g/ °C 0.56
Absolute viscosity at 20 °C, cP 20.9
Refractive index at 20 °C 1.4316
Autoignition Temperature °C 427
Critical Pressure Kpa 8.200
Dielectric Constant at 25°C 37.7

Monoethylene Glycol (MEG or ethylene glycol) is the most important of the commercially available glycols. 
Diethylene glycol (DEG) and triethylene glycol (TEG) are obtained as coproducts in the manufacture of MEG from ethylene oxide in some processes. 
MEG is consumed predominantly in polyesters (polyethylene terephthalate or PET) used for fibers, film, solid-state resins, and antifreeze. 
DEG and TEG are used in a wide variety of end products and as chemical intermediates.

Monoethylene Glycol (also known as MEG) is a clear, colourless, virtually odourless, and slightly viscous liquid. 
Monoethylene Glycol is miscible with water, alcohols, and many organic compounds, and has the formula C2H6O2. 
Monoethylene Glycol is the most important of the commercially available ethylene glycols as Monoethylene Glycol has many industrial applications.

Substance name:ethylene glycol
Trade name:Monoethyleneglycol
EC no:203-473-3
CAS no:107-21-1
HS code:29053100
KH product code:100042
Formula:C2H6O2

Synonyms:(1,2-dihydroxyethane / 1,2-ethanediol / 1,2-ethylene glycol / 2-hydroxyethanol / antifreeze / COREXIT 2920 / dihydroxyethane
DOWTHERM SR1 / ECA6969 / EG (=ethylene glycol) / ethane-1,2-diol / ethylene alcohol / ethylene dihydrate / FRIDEX / glycohol alcohol
glycol / glycol alcohol / LUTROL-9 / MACROGOL 400BPC / MEG (=monoethylene glycol) / monoethylene glycol / NA1142 / NORKOOL / RAMP
TESCOL / thermofluide UCAR17 / UCAR17 / ZEREX

Synonyms: 
monoethyleneglycol
mono ethyl glycol
meg glycol
ethylene glycol
1,2-ethanediol
Ethane-1,2-diol
EG industrial glycol
1,2-Dihydroxyethane
glycol alcohol.

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