BORIC ACID


Boric Acid is a weakly acidic hydrate of boric oxide with mild antiseptic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. The exact mechanism of action of boric acid is unknown; generally cytotoxic to all cells. It is used in the treatment of yeast infections and cold sores.
Boric acid is an odorless white solid. Melting point 171°C. Sinks and mixes with water. 
Boric acid is a member of boric acids. It has a role as an astringent. It is a conjugate acid of a dihydrogenborate.

CAS Number: 10043-35-3 

SYNONYMS 
Boracic Acid, Hydrogen Borate, Orthoboric Acid;
Boracic acid; Hydrogen orthoborate; Trihydroxyborane CAS NO. 10043-35-3; Boracic Acid, Hydrogen Borate, Orthoboric Acid; Boracic acid; Hydrogen orthoborate; Trihydroxyborane; Borsäure; ácido bórico; Acide borique; Orthoboric acid; TRIS-BORAT-EDTA PUFFER; TRIS-BORATE-EDTA; TRIS-BORATE-EDTA BUFFER; TRIS-BORATE-EDTA DISODIUM; Ant flip; basilitb; boric; Boric acid (BH3O3); Boric acid (H3BO3); boricacid(h3bo3); Boricacid,medicinal; Borofax; Boron hydroxide; Borsaure
CAS NO:10043-35-3, 11113-50-1 (Base); 13813-79-1 (orthoboric acid); 13460-50-9, 13780-71-7 (metaboric acid);                                                                                                                                   Boric acid, also called hydrogen borate, boracic acid, and orthoboric acid is a weak, monobasic Lewis acid of boron. However, some of its behaviour towards some chemical reactions suggest it to be tribasic acid in the Brønsted sense as well. Boric acid is often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, neutron absorber, or precursor to other chemical compounds. It has the chemical formula H3BO3 (sometimes written B(OH)3), and exists in the form of colorless crystals or a white powder that dissolves in water. When occurring as a mineral, it is called sassolite.Occurrence
Boric acid, or sassolite, is found mainly in its free state in some volcanic districts, for example, in the Italian region of Tuscany, the Lipari Islands and the US state of Nevada. In these volcanic settings it issues, mixed with steam, from fissures in the ground. It is also found as a constituent of many naturally occurring minerals – borax, boracite, ulexite (boronatrocalcite) and colemanite. Boric acid and its salts are found in seawater. It is also found in plants, including almost all fruits.

Boric acid was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652–1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi ("sedative salt of Homberg"). However borates, including boric acid, have been used since the time of the ancient Greeks for cleaning, preserving food, and other activities.reparation
Boric acid may be prepared by reacting borax (sodium tetraborate decahydrate) with a mineral acid, such as hydrochloric acid:

Na2B4O7·10H2O + 2 HCl → 4 B(OH)3 [or H3BO3] + 2 NaCl + 5 H2O
It is also formed as a by product of hydrolysis of boron trihalides and diborane:[4]

B2H6 + 6 H2O → 2 B(OH)3 + 6 H2
BX3 + 3 H2O → B(OH)3 + 3 HX (X = Cl, Br, I)
Properties
Boric acid is soluble in boiling water. When heated above 170 °C, it dehydrates, forming metaboric acid (HBO2):

H3BO3 → HBO2 + H2O
Metaboric acid is a white, cubic crystalline solid and is only slightly soluble in water. Metaboric acid melts at about 236 °C, and when heated above about 300 °C further dehydrates, forming tetraboric acid, also called pyroboric acid (H2B4O7):

4 HBO2 → H2B4O7 + H2O
The term boric acid may sometimes refer to any of these compounds. Further heating (to about 330 °C)[5] leads to boron trioxide.

H2B4O7 → 2 B2O3 + H2O
There are conflicting interpretations for the origin of the acidity of aqueous boric acid solutions. 
Raman spectroscopy of strongly alkaline solutions has shown the presence of B(OH)−4 ion,[6] leading some to conclude that the acidity is exclusively due to the abstraction of OH− from water:

B(OH)3 + H2O ⇌ B(OH)−4 +  H+ (K = 7.3×10−10; pK = 9.14) or more properly expressed in the aqueous solution:

B(OH)3 + 2 H2O ⇌ B(OH)−4 + H3O+
This may be characterized[7][8][9] as Lewis acidity of boron toward OH−, rather than as Brønsted acidity.

Polyborate anions are formed at pH 7–10 if the boron concentration is higher than about 0.025 mol/L. The best known of these is the 'tetraborate' ion, found in the mineral borax:

4 [B(OH)4]− + 2  H+ ⇌ [B4O5(OH)4]2− + 7 H2O
Boric acid makes an important contribution to the absorption of low frequency sound in seawater.

Reactions
With polyols containing cis-vicinal diols, such as glycerol and mannitol, the acidity of the boric acid solution is increased. With different mannitol concentrations, the pK of B(OH)3 extends on five orders of magnitude (from 9 to 4): this exacerbed acidity of boric acid in the presence of mannitol is also sometimes referred as "mannitoboric acid".[11] Greenwood and Earnshawn (1997)[12] refer to a pK value of 5.15 while a pK value of 3.80 is also reported in Vogel's book. This is due to the formation of a boron-mannitol chelate, [B(C6H8O2(OH)4)2]−, also known as mannitoborate complex, according to the following complexation reaction releasing a proton:

(mannitoboric acid)
boric acid
B(OH)3 + 2 mannitolC6H14O6
 ⇌ 
mannitoborate complex
[B(C6H8O2(OH)4)2]− + 3 H2O + H+
(pKa ranging from 4 to 9, depending on the mannitol concentration)
This feature is used in analytical chemistry to determine the boron content in aqueous solution by potentiometric titration with a strong base, such as NaOH.[12]

Boric acid also dissolves in anhydrous sulfuric acid:

B(OH)3 + 6 H2SO4 → B(HSO4)4− + 2 HSO4− + 3 H3O+
Boric acid reacts with alcohols to form borate esters, B(OR)3 where R is alkyl or aryl. 
A dehydrating agent, such as concentrated sulfuric acid is typically added:

B(OH)3 + 3 ROH → B(OR)3 + 3 H2O
A variety of salts are also known, involving the planar trigonal BO33– borate anion.

Molecular and crystal structure
The three oxygen atoms form a trigonal planar geometry around the boron. The B-O bond length is 136 pm and the O-H is 97 pm. The molecular point group is C3h.

Crystalline boric acid consists of layers of B(OH)3 molecules held together by hydrogen bonds of length 272 pm. The distance between two adjacent layers is 318 pm.Toxicology
Based on mammalian median lethal dose (LD50) rating of 2,660 mg/kg body mass, boric acid is only poisonous if taken internally or inhaled in large quantities. The Fourteenth Edition of the Merck Index indicates that the LD50 of boric acid is 5.14 g/kg for oral dosages given to rats, and that 5 to 20 g/kg has produced death in adult humans. For comparison's sake, the LD50 of salt is reported to be 3.75 g/kg in rats according to the Merck Index. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, "The minimal lethal dose of ingested boron (as boric acid) was reported to be 2–3 g in infants, 5–6 g in children, and 15–20 g in adults. [...] However, a review of 784 human poisonings with boric acid (10–88 g) reported no fatalities, with 88% of cases being asymptomatic."[15]

Long-term exposure to boric acid may be of more concern, causing kidney damage and eventually kidney failure (see links below). Although it does not appear to be carcinogenic, studies in dogs have reported testicular atrophy after exposure to 32 mg/kg bw/day for 90 days. This level is far lower than the LD50.

According to the CLH report for boric acid published by the Bureau for Chemical Substances Lodz, Poland, boric acid in high doses shows significant developmental toxicity and teratogenicity in rabbit, rat, and mouse fetuses as well as cardiovascular defects, skeletal variations, and mild kidney lesions.
At a 2010 European Diagnostics Manufacturing Association (EDMA) Meeting, several new additions to the Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC) candidate list in relation to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals Regulations 2007 (REACH) were discussed. Following the registration and review completed as part of REACH, the classification of Boric Acid CAS 10043-35-3 / 11113-50-1 is listed from 1 December 2010 is H360FD (May damage fertility. May damage the unborn child.)

Uses
Industrial
The primary industrial use of boric acid is in the manufacture of monofilament fiberglass usually referred to as textile fiberglass. Textile fiberglass is used to reinforce plastics in applications that range from boats, to industrial piping to computer circuit boards.

In the jewelry industry, boric acid is often used in combination with denatured alcohol to reduce surface oxidation and firescale from forming on metals during annealing and soldering operations.

Boric acid is used in the production of the glass in LCD flat panel displays.

In electroplating, boric acid is used as part of some proprietary formulas. One such known formula calls for about a 1 to 10 ratio of H3BO3 to NiSO4, a very small portion of sodium lauryl sulfate and a small portion of H2SO4.

Boric acid, mixed with borax (sodium tetraborate decahydrate) at the weight ratio of 4:5, is highly soluble in water, though they are not so soluble separately.[26] The solution is used for fire retarding agent of wood by impregnation.

It is also used in the manufacturing of ramming mass, a fine silica-containing powder used for producing induction furnace linings and ceramics.

Boric acid is one of the most commonly used substances that can counteract the harmful effects of reactive hydrofluoric acid (HF) after an accidental contact with the skin. It works by forcing the free F− anions into complex salts. This process defeats the extreme toxicity of hydrofluoric acid, particularly its ability to sequester ionic calcium from blood serum which can lead to cardiac arrest and bone decomposition; such an event can occur from just minor skin contact with HF.

Boric acid is added to borax for use as welding flux by blacksmiths.

Boric acid, in combination with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or silicone oil, is used to manufacture Silly Putty.

Boric acid is also present in the list of chemical additives used for hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania.[31] Indeed, it is often used in conjonction with guar gum as cross-linking and gelling agent for controlling the viscosity and the rheology of the fracking fluid injected at high pressure in the well. Indeed, it is important to control the fluid viscosity for keeping in suspension on long transport distances the grains of the propping agents aimed at maintaining the cracks in the shales sufficiently open to facilitate the gas extraction after the hydraulic pressure is relieved.[32][33][34] The rheological properties of borate cross-linked guar gum hydrogel mainly depend on the pH value.

Medical
Boric acid can be used as an antiseptic for minor burns or cuts and is sometimes used in salves and dressings, such as boracic lint. Boric acid is applied in a very dilute solution as an eye wash. Dilute boric acid can be used as a vaginal douche to treat bacterial vaginosis due to excessive alkalinity,as well as candidiasis due to non-albicans candida.As an antibacterial compound, boric acid can also be used as an acne treatment. It is also used as prevention of athlete's foot, by inserting powder in the socks or stockings. Various preparations can be used to treat some kinds of otitis externa (ear infection) in both humans and animals. The preservative in urine sample bottles in the UK is boric acid.

Boric acid solutions used as an eye wash or on abraded skin are known to be toxic, particularly to infants, especially after repeated use; this is because of its slow elimination rate.

Insecticidal
Boric acid was first registered in the US as an insecticide in 1948 for control of cockroaches, termites, fire ants, fleas, silverfish, and many other insects. The product is generally considered to be safe to use in household kitchens to control cockroaches and ants. It acts as a stomach poison affecting the insects' metabolism, and the dry powder is abrasive to the insects' exoskeletons. Boric acid also has the reputation as "the gift that keeps on killing" in that cockroaches that cross over lightly dusted areas do not die immediately, but that the effect is like shards of glass cutting them apart. This often allows a roach to go back to the nest where it soon dies. Cockroaches, being cannibalistic, eat others killed by contact or consumption of boric acid, consuming the powder trapped in the dead roach and killing them, too.

Preservation
In combination with its use as an insecticide, boric acid also prevents and destroys existing wet and dry rot in timbers. It can be used in combination with an ethylene glycol carrier to treat external wood against fungal and insect attack. It is possible to buy borate-impregnated rods for insertion into wood via drill holes where dampness and moisture is known to collect and sit. It is available in a gel form and injectable paste form for treating rot affected wood without the need to replace the timber. Concentrates of borate-based treatments can be used to prevent slime, mycelium, and algae growth, even in marine environments.

Boric acid is added to salt in the curing of cattle hides, calfskins, and sheepskins. This helps to control bacterial development, and helps to control insects.

pH buffer
Distribution between boric acid and borate ion versus pH assuming pKa = 9.0 (e.g. salt-water swimming pool)
Boric acid predominates in solution below pH 9
Buffer capacity of the boric acid - borate system versus pH assuming pKa = 9.0 (e.g. salt-water swimming pool)
Boric acid buffers against rising pH in swimming pools
Boric acid in equilibrium with its conjugate base the borate ion is widely used (in the concentration range 50 - 100 ppm boron equivalents) as a primary or adjunct pH buffer system in swimming pools. Boric acid is a weak acid, with pKa (the pH at which buffering is strongest because the free acid and borate ion are in equal concentrations) of 9.24 in pure water at 25 °C. But apparent pKa is substantially lower in swimming pool or ocean waters because of interactions with various other molecules in solution. It will be around 9.0 in a salt-water pool. No matter which form of soluble boron is added, within the acceptable range of pH and boron concentration for swimming pools, boric acid is the predominant form in aqueous solution, as shown in the accompanying figure. The boric acid - borate system can be useful as a primary buffer system (substituting for the bicarbonate system with pKa1 = 6.0 and pKa2 = 9.4 under typical salt-water pool conditions) in pools with salt-water chlorine generators that tend to show upward drift in pH from a working range of pH 7.5 - 8.2. Buffer capacity is greater against rising pH (towards the pKa around 9.0), as illustrated in the accompanying graph. The use of boric acid in this concentration range does not allow any reduction in free HOCl concentration needed for pool sanitation, but it may add marginally to the photo-protective effects of cyanuric acid and confer other benefits through anti-corrosive activity or perceived water softness, depending on overall pool solute composition.

Lubrication
Colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles of boric acid dissolved in petroleum or vegetable oil can form a remarkable lubricant on ceramic or metal surfaces with a coefficient of sliding friction that decreases with increasing pressure to a value ranging from 0.10 to 0.02. Self-lubricating H3BO3 films result from a spontaneous chemical reaction between water molecules and B2O3 coatings in a humid environment. In bulk-scale, an inverse relationship exists between friction coefficient and Hertzian contact pressure induced by applied load.

Boric acid is used to lubricate carrom and novuss boards, allowing for faster play.

Nuclear power
Boric acid is used in some nuclear power plants as a neutron poison. The boron in boric acid reduces the probability of thermal fission by absorbing some thermal neutrons. Fission chain reactions are generally driven by the probability that free neutrons will result in fission and is determined by the material and geometric properties of the reactor. Natural boron consists of approximately 20% boron-10 and 80% boron-11 isotopes. Boron-10 has a high cross-section for absorption of low energy (thermal) neutrons. By increasing boric acid concentration in the reactor coolant, the probability that a neutron will cause fission is reduced. Changes in boric acid concentration can effectively regulate the rate of fission taking place in the reactor. Boric acid is used only in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) whereas boiling water reactors (BWRs) employ control rod pattern and coolant flow for power control. BWRs use an aqueous solution of boric acid and borax or sodium pentaborate for an emergency shut down system. Boric acid may be dissolved in spent fuel pools used to store spent fuel elements. The concentration is high enough to keep neutron multiplication at a minimum. Boric acid was dumped over Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant after its meltdown to prevent another reaction from occurring.[citation needed]

Pyrotechnics
Boron is used in pyrotechnics to prevent the amide-forming reaction between aluminum and nitrates. A small amount of boric acid is added to the composition to neutralize alkaline amides that can react with the aluminum.

Boric acid can be used as a colorant to make fire green. For example, when dissolved in methanol it is popularly used by fire jugglers and fire spinners to create a deep green flame much stronger than copper sulfate.
Agriculture
Boric acid is used to treat or prevent boron deficiencies in plants. It is also used in preservation of grains such as rice and wheat.


Boric acid
Formula: BH3O3
Molecular weight: 61.833
CAS Registry Number: 10043-35-3
Chemical structure: BH3O3Other names: Orthoboric acid; H3-BO3; Boracic acid; Boric acid (BH3O3); Boric acid (H3BO3); Borofax; Boron hydroxide; Boron trihydroxide; NCI-C56417;
 Orthoboric acid (B(OH)3); Borsaure; Three elephant; Ant flip; Homberg's salt; B(OH)3; Basilit B; Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DF; Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DFPBO; Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DT; 
Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DTPBO; Flea Prufe; NSC 81726; Super Flea Eliminator; Trihydroxyborane; Acidum boricum (Salt/Mix); Bluboro (Salt/Mix); Collyrium Eye Wash (Salt/Mix); 
Collyrium Fresh-Eye Drops (Salt/Mix); component of Aci-Jel (Salt/Mix). 10043-35-3 [RN]
11113-50-1 [RN]
11B Labeled boric acid
13813-78-0 [RN]
234-343-4 [EINECS]
Acide borique [French] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
acidum boricum [Latin]
B(OH)3 [Formula]
Boric acid [ACD/IUPAC Name] [Trade name]
Boric acid-11B
Borsäure [German] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
MFCD00011337 [MDL number]
MFCD00151271 [MDL number]
Orthoboric acid
(10B)Orthoboric acid
11129-12-7 [RN]
12258-53-6 [RN]
12795-04-9 [RN]
1303-86-2 [RN]
13460-50-9 [RN]
13813-79-1 [RN]
14149-58-7 [RN]
1697939 [Beilstein]
7440-42-8 [RN]
Acidum boricum
Ant flip
Boracic acid
Boracic Acid, Orthoboric Acid
Borate (H3bo3)
borate ion
Boric acid ACS grade
Boric acid Electrophoresis grade
Boric acid flakes
Boric acid, biochemical grade
Boric Acid, Granular
Boric acid, NF/USP grade
Boric Acid, Powder
Boric acid-d3
BORIC-11B ACID
Borofax
Boron hydroxide
Boron trihydroxide [ACD/IUPAC Name]
Borsaeure
Borsaure
H3-BO3
Heptaoxotetra-Borate(2-)
Homberg's salt
https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/searchId.do?chebiId=CHEBI:33118
Hydrogen borate [ACD/IUPAC Name]
hydrogen orthoborate
InChI=1S/BH3O3/c2-1(3)4/h2-4H
Kill-off
Kjel-sorb
Orthboric acid
Orthoboricacid
Orthoborsaeure
tetraborate
trihydridoborate
trihydroxidoboron
Trihydroxyborane
Trihydroxyborone
WLN: QBQQ

BORIC ACID = Orthoboric acid = Boracic acid =  Boron hydroxide = Trihydroxyborone

Boric acid, also known as boracic acid or orthoboric acid, is a naturally occurring compound containing the elements boron, oxygen, and hydrogen (H3BO3). Boric acid crystals are
 white, odorless, and nearly tasteless. It looks like fine table salt in the granular form or like baby powder in the powdered form.

Borates, the general term associated with boron containing minerals such as borax and boric acid, most commonly originate in dried salt lakebeds of deserts or arid areas 
(such as Death Valley, CA, Turkey, and China) or other geographic regions that expose similar deposits (such as the Andes Mountains in South America).

Boric acid crystals were first man-made in 1702 by Wilhelm Homberg who mixed borax and mineral acids with water. The evaporating water left crystals of boric acid and was often 
called “Homberg’s salt.” European researchers soon discovered the compound’s properties as a mild antiseptic and eyewash.

James Wright, a General Electric engineer searching for rubber substitutes during WWII, came upon a remarkable new material by mixing silicone oil with boric acid. 
The new compound had unique properties, acting very much like rubber. 
It could be stretched to many times its length without breaking and bounced 25% higher than a normal rubber ball. It could even 
pick up the images of most printed material. In 1949 the material was given the name Silly Putty® and it sold faster than any other toy at that time.

Boric acid is one of the most commonly produced borates and is widely used throughout the world in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, as a nutritional supplement, 
flame retardant, in the manufacture of glass and fiberglass, and in the production of wood preservatives to control pests and fungus.
During the first world war, a variety of antiseptic solutions were used to treat the wounds of injured soldiers. 
One of the most common was prepared by dissolving dry sodium carbonate and bleaching powder in tap water, filtering the solution to remove the calcium carbonate that precipitated, and finally adding boric acid, a mild antiseptic. 
The English organic chemist Henry Dakin described the preparation in the British Medical Journal in August 1915.

Boric acid is a white waxy solid that occurs naturally as sassolite, a mineral found in Tuscany in Italy and Nevada in the United States. 
The acid is manufactured by the reaction of sulfuric or hydrochloric acid with a sodium borate mineral such as borax or kernite, or the calcium borate mineral colemanite.

Boric acid on a light background


Boric acid is a white waxy solid that occurs naturally as sassolite

Boric acid has a multiplicity of applications. It is used, for example, as an oxidation catalyst and in the manufacture of cosmetics, domestic insecticides, and fire retardants for textiles.

The acid is poisonous if ingested in large quantities. Brief exposure, however, is less dangerous, according to a fact sheet published by the National Pesticide Information Center in the United States. ‘Boric acid is low in toxicity if eaten or if it contacts skin,’ it notes.

Its use in antiseptic preparations such as Dakin’s solution has declined over recent decades for a variety of reasons. 
The National Health Service in Britain advises that antiseptics should not be used to clean wounds as they may damage the skin. 
Tap water or saline solution should be used instead.

Boric acid is a water-soluble white compound and occurs naturally. It consists of oxygen, boron, and hydrogen. It is claimed to have antifungal and antimicrobial properties. Always consult your healthcare provider before applying boric acid to any body part. It is irritating to the skin and may cause severe reactions.

The uses may include:

Boric acid is often a part of homeopathic medicines used for treating vaginal discharge and itching. 
This medication is a combination of friendly bacteria, vitamin E, and minute amounts of boric acid.
It is usually used in dilute solutions as a treatment for diaper rash, insect bites and stings, and sunburns.
Boric acid is an effective pesticide for cockroaches, rats, and flies.
Boric acid is called a swimming pool chemical because it has proved to be highly useful for maintenance. It can help stabilize the pH level of water and prevent problems with algae. This product reduces the amount of chlorine needed in the pool. The compound can help to keep the water clear and sparkling. It is also used for clearing off fungi in the pool water.
Boric acid is also helpful in treating various types of ear infections in both humans and pets (otitis externa, also called swimmer's ear, is an infection of the outer ear canal). The use of boric acid in children is not recommended.
Boric acid is also helpful in treating foul foot odor. A person suffering from excessive smelly feet can apply boric acid powder mixed with talc to the inner side of footwear.
Boric acid when mixed with distilled water serves as a wound spray. The solution contains antiseptic properties that help in treating minor wounds such as cuts and burns. This must not be used too frequently.
Urine sample bottles often contain boric acid as a preservative, which maintains the quality of the specimen as it travels to the lab. Clear bottles tend to have a small amount of boric acid powder at the bottom. Research shows that the addition of this substance lowers false-positive results. It also preserves the white blood cells in the urine for analysis.
Boric acid helps to get rid of tough stains on clothes by adding it to regular detergent while doing laundry.
They are used to remove dirt and odor from kitchens and bathrooms. 
Due to its flame-retardant properties, boric acid is extensively used in the manufacture of furniture, mattresses, and insulation. Boric acid is helpful in the preservation of timbers against fungal and insect attack.
Boric acid is used industrially for the manufacture of fiberglass, household glass products, and glass used in liquid crystal display (LCD). To produce glass with a better chemical and high-temperature resistance, boric acid is applied to glass products.
Boric acid serves as an excellent cleaner for all types of mold problems and insects such as ants, cockroaches, silverfish, fleas, and others.
Boric acid is also used in leather manufacture, and it is used in the jewelry industry in combination with denatured alcohol.
Boric acid is also used for welding flux by blacksmiths.
Its mixture with petroleum or vegetable oil works as an excellent lubricant that can be used on ceramic or metal surfaces. It can also be used to lubricate carrom boards for faster and smooth play.
Manufacturers use boric acid in various products such as enamels, pesticides, glazes, and paints.
Boric acid is widely used to treat boron deficiencies in plants.

Regulatory process names
Boric acid
Boric acid, crude natural

Translated names
acid boric, brut natural, cu un conţinut maxim de H3BO3 de 85%, calculat la greutatea substanţei uscate (ro)

acide borique (fr)

acido borico, grezzo, naturale, contenente non più di 85% di H3BO3 calcolato in base al peso secco (it)

aċidu boriku, naturali mhux proċessat, li fih mhux aktar minn 85 fil-mija ta’ H3BO3 ikkalkulat fuq il-piż niexef (mt)

boorhape, looduslik toore, H3BO3 sisaldus kuni 85% kuivmassist (et)

boorihappo, raaka luonnon boorihappo, joka sisältää enintään 85 % H3BO3 kuivapainosta laskettuna (fi)

boorzuur, ruw, natuurlijk, met een gehalte aan H3BO3 van niet meer dan 85 gewichtspercenten, berekend op de droge stof (nl)

borna kiselina (hr)

boro rūgštis, neapdorota gamtinė, turinti daugiau kaip 85 % H3BO3, skaičiuojant sausos medžiagos masei (lt)

borova kislina – surova, naravna, ki ne vsebuje več kot 85 odstotkov H3BO3, računano na suho težo (sl)

borskābe, neattīrīta dabīga, satur ne vairāk kā 85% H3BO3 sausnas masā (lv)

borsyra, rå, naturlig, innehållande högst 85 viktprocent H3BO3 beräknat på torrsubstansen (sv)

borsyre, rå naturlig, indeholdende højst 85% H3BO3, beregnet som tør vægt (da)

borsyre, rå, naturlig, som innholder maks. 85 % H₃BO₃ beregnet ut fra tørrvekt (no)

Borsäure, natürliche, rohe, mit einem Massenanteil von höchstens 85 % H3BO3 in der Trockensubstanz (de)

bórsav, nyers természetes, max. 85% H3BO3–tartalommal, száraz tömegre mérve (hu)

kwas borowy, w stanie surowym naturalnym, zawierający nie więcej niż 85% H3BO3 w przeliczeniu na suchą pozostałość (pl)

kyselina boritá, přírodní neupravená, obsahující nejvýše 85 % H3BO3 v sušině (cs)

kyselina boritá, surová prírodná, s obsahom nie viac ako 85 % H3BO3 v sušine (sk)

ácido bórico natural em bruto com teor ponderal de H3BO3 não superior a 85 %, calculado em relação ao produto seco (pt)

ácido bórico, crudo natural, que contiene no más del 85 % de H3BO3 calculado en peso seco (es)

βορικό οξύ, ακατέργαστο φυσικό, με περιεκτικότητα σε H3BO3 που δεν υπερβαίνει το 85%, υπολογιζόμενη επί ξηράς ουσίας (el)

борна киселина, нерафинирана, натурална, съдържаща не повече от 85 процента H3BO3, изчислени като тегловен процент от сухото вещество (bg)


boric acid, crude natural, containing not more than 85 per cent of H3BO3 calculated on the dry weight

Other identifiers
005-007-00-2

Index Number
11113-50-1

Name    EC / List no.    CAS no.    Association
Boric acid
EC No. 233-139-2 and EC No. 234-343-4


Boric Acid >
Chemical formula: H3BO3
Material: Boric acid, also called boracic acid or orthoboric acid, is a mild acid often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, glass, wood preservatives, in nuclear power plants to control the fission rate of uranium and as a precursor of other chemical compounds. It has the chemical formula H3BO3. Boric acid is produced mainly from borate minerals by the reaction with sulfuric acid.

Grades OF Boric Acid: Technical material in both granular and powder forms.

Packaging: Material is available in 25 kilo, 500 kilo, 1000 kilo and 1200 kilo nett bags.

basilit b
     boracic acid
ortho    boric acid
     boricacid
     borofax
     boron trihydroxide
     dr.'s 1 flea terminator DF
     dr.'s 1 flea terminator DFPBO
     dr.'s 1 flea terminator DT
     dr.'s 1 flea terminator DTPBO
     flea prufe
     super flea eliminator
     three elephant
     trihydroxyborone


Product Description
Boric Acid

Application Notes
Boric acid is used for weatherproofing wood and fireproofing fabrics; as a preservative; manufacturing of cements, crockery, porcelain, enamels, glass, borates, leather, carpets, hats, soaps, artificial gems; in nickeling baths; cosmetics; printing and dyeing, painting; photography; for impregnating wicks; electric condensers; hardening steel. It is also used as an insecticide for cockroaches and black carpet beetles. 
It is used In the research labs , astringent, antiseptic, antibacterial and antifungal agent. 
It is used in buffers and for calibration of polyacrylamide gel columns for the separation of oligonucleotides by capillary electrophoresis.

Usage Statement
Unless specified otherwise, MP Biomedical's products are for research or further manufacturing use only, not for direct human use. 
For more information, please contact our customer service department.

Key Applications
Buffer component


Overview
Boric acid, also called boracic acid or orthoboric acid or Acidum Boricum, is a mild acid often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, in nuclear power plants to control the fission rate of uranium, and as a precursor of other chemical compounds. It exists in the form of colorless crystals or a white powder and dissolves in water. It has the chemical formula H3BO3, sometimes written B(OH)3. When occurring as a mineral, it is called sassolite.

Preparation
Boric acid is produced mainly from borate minerals by the reaction with sulfuric acid. 
The largest source of borates in the world is an open-pit mine in Boron, California, USA.

Properties
Boric acid was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652-1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi ("sedative salt of Homberg"). The presence of boric acid or its salts has been noted in sea-water. It is also said to exist in plants and especially in almost all fruits (A. H. Allen, Analyst, 1904, 301). The free acid is found native in certain volcanic districts such as Tuscany, the Lipari Islands and Nevada, issuing mixed with steam from fissures in the ground; it is also found as a constituent of many minerals (borax, boracite, boronatrocaicite and colemanite).Boric acid is soluble in boiling water. When heated above 170°C it dehydrates, forming metaboric acid HBO2. Metaboric acid is a white, cubic crystalline solid and is only slightly soluble in water. It melts at about 236°C, and when heated above about 300°C further dehydrates, forming tetraboric acid or pyroboric acid, H2B4O7. Boric acid can refer to any of these compounds. Further heating leads to boron trioxide.

Boric acid does not dissociate in aqueous solution, but is acidic due to its interaction with water molecules:

B(OH)3 + H2O ⇌ B(OH)4− + H+
Ka = 5.8x10−10 mol/l; pKa = 9.24.
Polyborate anions are formed at pH 7–10 if the boron concentration is higher than about 0.025 mol/L. The best known of these is the tetraborate ion, found in the mineral borax:

4B(OH)4− + 2H+ ⇌ B4O72− + 9H2O
Crystal structure
Crystalline boric acid consists of layers of B(OH)3 molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. The distance between two adjacent layers is 318 pm.

Boric-acid-unit-cell-3D-balls.png
Boric-acid-layer-3D-balls.png
the unit cell of boric acid
hydrogen bonding (dashed lines)
allows boric acid molecules to form
parallel layers in the solid state
Toxicology
While strictly speaking, Boric Acid is poisonous if taken internally or inhaled, it is generally not considered to be much more toxic than table salt (based on its mammal LD50 rating of 2660mg/kg body mass).[2]. The Thirteenth Edition of the Merck Index indicates that the LD50 of boric acid is 5.14 g/kg for oral dosages given to rats, and that 5 to 20 g/kg has produced death in adult humans. The LD50 of sodium chloride is reported to be 3.75 g/kg in rats according to the Merk Index. According to the Dutch Health Council(1998/19) Boric Acid should be regarded as if it impairs fertility in humans (R60).

However, it is toxic to unborn infants, and on the testicles of boys. 
Also, it has been associated with low birth weight, eye malformations and problems with the nervous system.

Uses
Medicinal uses
It can be used as an antiseptic for minor burns or cuts and is sometimes used in dressings or salves or is applied in a very dilute solution as an eye wash. (1.5% solution or 1 tbsp per quart of boiled water has been suggested for the latter.) 
As an anti-bacterial compound, boric acid can also be used as an acne treatment. Boric acid can be used to treat yeast and fungal infections such as candidiasis (vaginal yeast infections) by inserting a vaginal suppository containing 600 mg of boric acid daily for 14 days (PMID 10865926). It is also used as prevention of athlete's foot, by inserting powder in the socks or stockings, and in solution can be used to treat some kinds of otitis externa (ear infection) in both humans and animals. The preservative in urine sample bottles (red cap) in the UK is boric acid.

Boric acid has the distinction of being the only known acid that is actually beneficial (rather than harmful) to the eyes, and as such is used by ophthalmologists and in some commercial eye drops.

Insecticidal use
Boric acid was first registered as an insecticide in 1948 by the EPA for control of cockroaches, termites, fire ants, fleas, silverfish, and many other insects. 
It acts as a stomach poison affecting the insects' metabolism, and the dry powder is abrasive to the insects' exoskeleton.

Boric acid may be used either in an insect bait formulation containing a feed attractant or as a dry powder. 
The powder may be injected into cracks and crevices, where it forms a fine layer of dust. Insects travel through the boric acid dust, which adheres to their legs. When the insects groom themselves, they then ingest the poison, which causes death three to ten days later of starvation and dehydration.

Preservative Use
In combination with its use as an insecticide it also prevents and destroys existing wet and dry rot in timbers. 
It can be used in combination with an ethylene glycol carrier to treat external wood against fungal and insect attack. 
It is possible to buy Borate impregnated rods for insertion into wood via drill holes where damp and moisture is known to collect and sit. 
It is available in a gel form and injectable paste form for treating rot affected wood without the need to replace the timber. 
You can buy concentrates of Borate based timber treatments which can be sprayed or dipped. 
Surface treatments prevent slime, mycelium and algae growth even in marine environments. 
There is a wide range of manufacturers of wood preservers based on boric acid/ borate mineral salts.

Industrial uses
Boric acid is used in nuclear power plants to slow down the rate at which fission is occurring.
Fission chain reactions are generally driven by the amount of neutrons present (as products from previous fissions). 
Natural Boron is 20% Boron-10 and about 80% Boron-11. Boron-10 has a high cross-section for absorption of low energy (thermal) neutrons. By adding more boric acid to the reactor coolant which circulates through the reactor, the probability that a neutron can survive to cause fission is reduced. Therefore, boric acid concentration changes effectively regulate the rate of fissions taking place in the reactor. This is only done in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's). Boron is also dissolved into the spent fuel pools containing used uranium rods. The concentration is high enough to keep fissions at a minimum.

In the jewelry industry, boric acid is often used in combination with denatured alcohol to reduce surface oxidation and firescale from forming on metals during annealing and soldering operations.

It is also used in the manufacturing of remming mass, a fine silica-containing powder used for producing induction furnace linings and ceramics.

Miscellaneous uses
Borates including boric acid have been used since the time of the Greeks for cleaning, preserving food, and other activities.

Silly Putty was originally made by adding boric acid to silicone oil. Now name-brand Silly Putty also contains significant amounts of elemental silicon (silicon binds to the silicone and allows the material to bounce 20% higher).

Lithium borate is the lithium salt of boric acid and is used in the laboratory as buffer for gel. TBE buffer is widely used for the electrophoresis of nucleic acids and has a higher buffer capacity than a TAE Buffer. It can be used for DNA and RNA polyacrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.

It is used in pyrotechnics to prevent the amide-forming reaction between aluminum and nitrates. A small amount of boric acid is added to the composition to neutralize alkaline amides that can react with the aluminum.

Boric acid is popularly used among fire jugglers and fire spinners dissolved in methanol to give a deep green flame.

It is also used in India and across the world to dust down Carrom boards to decrease friction and increase speed of play.

Boric acid is also used in special effects. When Boric Acid is combined with an alcohol (usually ethanol), it produces a green flame when burned.


oric acid (H3BO3), also known as [b(OH)3] or H3BO3, belongs to the class of inorganic compounds known as miscellaneous borates. 
These are inorganic compounds in which the largest metallic oxoanion is borate, to which either no atom or a non metal atom is bonded. Boric acid (H3BO3) is a drug. Boric acid (H3BO3) is an extremely weak basic (essentially neutral)
compound (based on its pKa). Boric acid (H3BO3) exists in all living organisms, ranging from bacteria to humans. 
Outside of the human body, boric acid (H3bo3) is found, on average, in the highest concentration in pomegranates. boric acid (H3bo3) has also been detected, but not quantified in, a few different foods, such as figs, french plantains, and redcurrants.
 This could make boric acid (H3bo3) a potential biomarker for the consumption of these foods. It has limited use as an antibacterial agent in caviar. 
Boric acid (H3BO3) is a potentially toxic compound. No indication of carcinogenicity to humans (not listed by IARC). 
Rinse mouth with water (never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person). INGESTION: do not induce vomiting. 
INHALATION: supply fresh air. 
Boric acid (H3BO3) also called hydrogen borate, boracic acid,
Boric acid (H3BO3) is a weak acid of boron often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, neutron absorber, or precursor to other chemical compounds. 
When occurring as a mineral, it is called sassolite. 
If necessary, the person should shower and change contaminated clothing and shoes, and then must seek medical attention.

What is boric acid and its use?

Boric acid (H3BO3) is an antiseptic, pesticide and a weak fungicide. 
It always be used for insect control, wood preservative in furniture industry, glass industry and also in medical field.

What is preservative?

Preservative means any substances that, when added to food, is capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of decomposition, fermentation or acidification of such  food but shall not include herb, spice, vinegar or wood smoke.

What are the preservative that allowed in Food Regulations 1985?

Food Regulations 1985 only allowed certain preservatives (sulphur dioxide, benzoic acid; propionic acid, also its sodium, potassium, calcium salt; sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, 
potassium nitrate and potassium nitrite) and antimicrobial (chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide) in certain food. Hence, oric acid is not included in the list.

Under the Food Law, is it an offence to use boric acid in food and what is the penalty?

Use of boric acid in food violated Sub Section 13 (1) Food Act 1983 which stated that “Any person who prepares or sell any food that has in or upon it any substance which is poisonous, 
harmful or otherwise injurious to health commits an offence and shall be liable, on conviction, to a fine not exceeding one hundred thousand ringgit or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years or to both”.

What are the foods that always contain boric acid?

Although boric acid is not allowed in food, it had been found in pasta type of food such as yellow noodles, kueh teow, laksa, loh se fun, wantan noodles, Hokkien noodles, bee hoon, 
spring roll wrappers and bak chang.

The presence of boric acid in food or food product is due to unethical attitude of some greedy food producer without considering the safety aspect of food to the consumer. 
Boric acid is used by these food producers to extend the product shelf-life and its freshness.

What are the side effects if boric acid present in food?

Individuals who ate food that contained high level of boric acid will experience nausea, vomiting diarrhea, dermatitis, abnormal function of kidney, acute dysfunction of blood circulation
 and death, depends to the level of boric acid absorbed by the body.

How to detect the presence of boric acid in the foods?

Analysis using turmeric water is a crude test to detect the presence of boric acid, however the test is not a confirmatory test. 
It can give a false positive result. In mee processing 
for example, additional of soda water (Natrium bicarbonate) have been used to get the expected texture. 
The reaction between soda water and turmeric can cause a changing of color from yellow to red. 
Therefore, the presence of boric acid can only be confirm through lab analysis.

Advise to consumers

Consumers are advised not to use turmeric water as a test to verify the presence of boric acid. 
Consumers should report to any nearest District Health Ofiice, State Health Department 
or through Food Safety and Quality Division website (http://fsq.moh.gov.my) pertaining to suspicious of boric acid presence in food.


Boric acid Formula
Boric acid is a weak inorganic acid with antiseptic properties, and is also called boracic acid or orthoboric acid.

Formula and structure: The chemical formula of boric acid is H3BO3 (or B(OH)3). 
Its molecular formula is BH3O3, and its molar mass is 61.83 g/mol. The chemical structure of boric acid is shown below:

The central boron atom is connected to three hydroxyl (-OH) groups, which are capable of strong hydrogen bonding. 
Its solid crystalline structure consists of parallel layers of boric acid held together in place by hydrogen bonds.

Occurrence: Boric acid occurs naturally in volcanic areas, and in certain minerals such as borax (as sassolite). 
It is also found in sea water, plants, and fruits in small amounts.

Preparation: Boric acid is prepared by reacting minerals such as borax (Na2B4O7·10H2O), with strong acids like HCl:

Na2B4O7·10H2O + 2 HCl → 4 H3BO3 + 2 NaCl + 5 H2O

It can also be prepared by the hydrolysis of boron trihalides (such as BBr3) or diborane (B2H6):

BBr3 + 3 H2O → B(OH)3 + 3 HBr

B2H6 + 6 H2O → 2 B(OH)3 + 6 H2

Physical properties: Boric acid is a white crystalline solid with a density of 1.435 g/mL, melting point of 170.9 °C and boiling point of 300 °C.

Chemical properties: Boric acid is a weak monobasic acid, and is considered a Lewis acid. 
It dissolves in boiling water and in anhydrous sulfuric acid. When heated to high temperatures (over 170 °C), it undergoes dehydration to form metaboric acid (HBO2):

H3BO3 → HBO2 + H2O

Uses: Boric acid is non-toxic with antibacterial properties, and it is mainly used as an antiseptic agent, acne treatment, preservative, insecticide, pH buffer, swimming pool chemical, flame retardant, and a precursor to many useful chemicals. 
It is used industrially for the manufacture of fiberglass, household glass products and the glass used in LCD displays.

Health hazards/ health effects: Low concentrations of boric acid does not pose any toxicity. However, boric acid is poisonous if swallowed or inhaled in large quantities. 
High concentrations of boric acid can potentially lead to reproductive problems. Exposure to boric acid over long periods of time can cause possible kidney damage

BORIC ACID = Orthoboric acid = Boracic acid =  Boron hydroxide = Trihydroxyborone

BORIC ACID

Orthoboric acid

10043-35-3

Boracic acid

Borofax

Boron hydroxide

Boron trihydroxide

Boric acid (H3BO3)

Three Elephant

Basilit B

Trihydroxyborone

Flea Prufe

Super Flea Eliminator

11113-50-1

Orthoboric acid (B(OH)3)

Orthoborsaeure

Boric acid (BH3O3)

Borsaeure

Borsaure

Trihydroxyborane

Acidum boricum

Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DT

Boric acid (VAN)

Bluboro

Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DFPBO

Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DF

Collyrium Eye Wash

Dr.'s 1 Flea Terminator DTPBO

NCI-C56417

MFCD00011337

B(OH)3

trihydroxidoboron

Ant flip

Homberg's salt

UNII-R57ZHV85D4

NSC 81726

Boric acid (TN)

(10B)Orthoboric acid

Boracic acid, Orthoboric acid

R57ZHV85D4

CHEBI:33118

[B(OH)3]

NSC-81726

NCGC00090745-02

Optibor

DSSTox_CID_194

Orthboric Acid

Kjel-Sorb™ Solution

DSSTox_RID_75425

DSSTox_GSID_20194

Borsaure [German]

Boric acid, 99+%, extra pure

Caswell No. 109

Boron, Reference Standard Solution

Boric acid, 99.5%, for analysis

Kjel-sorb

Kill-off

ortho-boric acid

Boric acid [USAN:JAN]

hydrogen orthoborate

BO3

CCRIS 855

Niban Granular Bait

CAS-10043-35-3

HSDB 1432

Boric acid [JAN:NF]

BORIC ACID, ACS

EINECS 233-139-2

Boric acid, 99.99%, (trace metal basis), extra pure

EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 011001

Orthoboric acid (H3BO3)

hydrogen borate

Orthoborc acd

AI3-02406

Boric acid, 99.5%, for molecular biology, DNAse, RNAse and Protease free

Boric acid flakes

Boric Acid, Powder

Bluboro (Salt/Mix)

Boric Acid, Granular

Boric acid ACS grade

PubChem10918

ACMC-1BSON

Boric acid, Puratronic?

WLN: QBQQ

Boric acid, ACS reagent

Heptaoxotetra-Borate(2-)

bmse000941

Boric acid (JP15/NF)

Boric acid (JP17/NF)

Acidum boricum (Salt/Mix)

EC 233-139-2

Boric acid, NF/USP grade

H3BO3

Boric acid, biochemical grade

BIDD:ER0252

CHEMBL42403

INS NO.284

Boric acid Electrophoresis grade

Collyrium Eye Wash (Salt/Mix)

DTXSID1020194

BDBM39817

KGBXLFKZBHKPEV-UHFFFAOYSA-

INS-284

Boric acid, 99.9% metals basis

BCP21018

Boric acid, 99.99% metals basis

Boric acid, BioXtra, >=99.5%

NSC81726

Boric acid, 99.6%, ACS reagent

EINECS 237-478-7

Tox21_111004

Tox21_202185

Tox21_301000

1332-77-0 (di-potassium salt)

BC-140

STL445672

Boric acid, 99.998% metals basis

AKOS015833571

ZINC245189278

Boric acid, ACS reagent, >=99.5%

DB11326

LS41322

11113-50-1;Boric acid;Boracic acid

Boric acid, 99.97% trace metals basis

Boric acid, USP, 99.5-100.5%

NCGC00090745-01

NCGC00090745-03

NCGC00090745-04

NCGC00090745-05

NCGC00254902-01

NCGC00259734-01

BC001419

Boric acid, crude natural, containing not more than 85 per cent ofH3BO3 calculated on the dry weight

Boric acid, ReagentPlus(R), >=99.5%

BP-13473

Boric acid, 99.999% trace metals basis

Boric acid, SAJ first grade, >=99.5%

Boric acid, for electrophoresis, >=99.5%

Boric acid, JIS special grade, >=99.5%

B7305

Boric acid, Vetec(TM) reagent grade, 98%

E-284

FT-0623166

FT-0623167

Boric acid, tablet, 1 g boric acid per tablet

C12486

D01089

A800201

Q187045

J-000132

J-523836

Boric acid, >=99.5%, suitable for amino acid analysis

Boric acid, NIST(R) SRM(R) 951a, isotopic standard

Boric acid, NIST(R) SRM(R) 973, acidimetric standard

Boric acid, BioUltra, for molecular biology, >=99.5% (T)

Boric acid, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard

Boric acid, cell culture tested, plant cell culture tested, >=99.5%

Boric acid, Biotechnology Performance Certified, >=99.5% (titration), Cell Culture Tested

Boric acid, p.a., ACS reagent, reag. ISO, reag. Ph. Eur., 99.5-100.5%

Boron standard solution, 1 mg/mL B, suitable for atomic absorption spectrometry, 1000 ppm B

Buffer solution, pH 11.00 (?0.01 at 25?C), No Color, Specpure?, NIST Traceable

Boric acid, BioReagent, for molecular biology, suitable for cell culture, suitable for plant cell culture, >=99.5%

Boric acid, puriss. p.a., ACS reagent, reag. ISO, reag. Ph. Eur., buffer substance, >=99.8%

Boric acid, puriss., meets analytical specification of Ph. Eur., BP, NF, 99.5-100.5%, powder

Boric acid and its sodium borate salts are pesticides that we can find in nature and many products. Borax is one of the most common products. Boric acid and its sodium salts each combine boron with other elements in a different way. In general, their toxicities each depend on the amount of boron they contain.

Boric acid and its sodium salts can be used to control a wide variety of pests. These include insects, spiders, mites, algae, molds, fungi, and weeds. Products that contain boric acid have been registered for use in the United States since 1948.


What are some products that contain boric acid?
Products containing boric acid can be liquids, granules, pellets, tablets, wettable powders, dusts, rods, or baits. They are used indoors in places like homes, hospitals and commercial buildings. They are also used in outdoor residential areas, sewage systems, and on food and non-food crops. There are over five hundred products with boric acid sold in the United States. Several non-pesticide products containing boric acid include soil amendments, fertilizers, household cleaners, laundry detergents, and personal care products.

Boric acid is often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, neutron absorber, or precursor to other chemical compounds. 
Boric acid has the chemical formula H3BO3 (sometimes written B(OH)3), and exists in the form of colorless crystals or a white powder that dissolves in water.


 

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