COPPER CARBONATE

CAS Number: 12069-69-1 
EC Number: 214-671-4
Chemical formula: CuCO3
Molar mass: 123.5549

Copper Carbonate is a water insoluble Copper source that can easily be converted to other Copper compounds, such as the oxide by heating (calcination). 
Carbonate compounds also give off carbon dioxide when treated with dilute acids. 
Copper Carbonate is generally immediately available in most volumes. 
High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered.
We manufacture Copper Carbonate which is a blue-green compound used in paints and varnish. 
Copper Carbonate was earlier used as a pigment but now Copper Carbonate finds its application in some lipsticks.
Copper Carbonate(CuCo3 )is the chemical formula of copper carbonate and is greenish in color. 
Copper Carbonate is a fine powder without any lumps and is odorless.

Copper(II) carbonate or cupric carbonate is a chemical compound with formula CuCO3. 
At ambient temperatures, Copper Carbonate is an ionic solid (a salt) consisting of copper(II) cations Cu2+ and carbonate anions CO2−3.

Copper Carbonate is rarely encountered because Copper Carbonate is difficult to prepare and readily reacts with water moisture from the air. 
The terms "copper carbonate", "copper(II) carbonate", and "cupric carbonate" almost always refer (even in chemistry texts) to a basic copper carbonate (or copper(II) carbonate hydroxide), such as Cu2(OH)2CO3 (which occurs naturally as the mineral malachite) or Cu3(OH)2(CO3)2 (azurite). 
For this reason, the qualifier neutral may be used instead of "basic" to refer specifically to CuCO3.

Uses of Copper Carbonate:
Both malachite and azurite, as well as basic copper carbonate have been used as pigments.
One example of the use of both azurite and its artificial form blue verditer is the portrait of the family of Balthasar Gerbier by Peter Paul Rubens.
The green skirt of Deborah Kip is painted in azurite, smalt, blue verditer (artificial form of azurite), yellow ochre, lead-tin-yellow and yellow lake. 
The green color is achieved by mixing blue and yellow pigments.

Copper Carbonate has also been used in some types of make-up, like lipstick, although Copper Carbonate can also be toxic to humans. 
Copper Carbonate also has been used for many years as an effective algaecide in farm ponds and in aquaculture operations.
Use: Copper Carbonate is a water insoluble Copper source that can easily be converted to other Copper compounds, such as the oxide by heating (calcination). 
Carbonate compounds also give off carbon dioxide when treated with dilute acids. 
Copper Carbonate is generally immediately available in most volumes. 
High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered. 

Basic copper carbonate is a chemical compound, more properly called copper(II) carbonate hydroxide. 
Copper Carbonate is an ionic compound (a salt) consisting of the ions copper(II) Cu2+, carbonate CO2−3, and hydroxide OH−.

The name most commonly refers to the compound with formula Cu2CO3(OH)2.
Copper Carbonate is a green crystalline solid that occurs in nature as the mineral malachite. 
Copper Carbonate has been used since antiquity as a pigment, and Copper Carbonate is still used as such in artist paints, sometimes called verditer, green bice, or mountain green.

What is copper carbonate used for? What is difference between copper carbonate and copper oxide? How do you use oxides in ceramics? What is cupric carbonate used for?
Copper Carbonate is a water-insoluble Copper source that can easily be converted to other Copper compounds, such as oxide by heating (calcination). 
Carbonate compounds also give off carbon dioxide when treated with dilute acids. 
Copper Carbonate is generally immediately available in most volumes. 
High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered.

Both malachite and azurite can be found in the verdigris patina that is found on weathered brass, bronze, and copper. 
The composition of the patina can vary, in a maritime environment depending on the environment a basic chloride may be present, in an urban environment basic sulfates may be present.
Copper Carbonate is often improperly called (even in chemistry articles) copper carbonate, cupric carbonate, and similar names. 
The true (neutral) copper(II) carbonate CuCO3 is not known to occur naturally. 

Copper Carbonate is decomposed by water or moisture from the air and was synthesized only in 1973 by high temperature and very high pressures.
All pigments for ceramics are intermixable so why not get creative and experiment by missing your own completely fresh color. 
During the firing process, the colors fuse extra vigorously creating purity, intensity, and brilliance. 
The colour of copper carbonate is stronger, therefore, significantly less percentage is needed to create vivid colors making them excessively cost-effective.

How to use Copper Carbonate Colour in the pottery: 
Both malachite and azurite, as well as basic copper carbonate have been used as pigments. 
One example of the use of both azurite and Copper Carbonates artificial form blue verditer is the portrait of the family of Balthasar Gerbier by Peter Paul Rubens. 
The green skirt of Deborah Kip is painted in azurite, smalt, blue verditer (an artificial form of azurite), yellow ochre, lead-tin-yellow and yellow lake. 
The green color is achieved by mixing blue and yellow pigments.
Copper Carbonate has also been used in some types of make-up, like lipstick, although Copper Carbonate can also be toxic to humans. 
Copper Carbonate also has been used for many years as an effective algaecide in farm ponds and in aquaculture operations.
When using ceramic pigments in glazes, usually in concentrations of 1–10%, a little more care must be taken because some pigment systems react with materials in a glaze.

Copper Carbonate General description
Copper(II) carbonate basic is naturally found in azurite and malachite. 
On heating, Copper Carbonate undergoes decomposition to form copper(II) oxide, carbon dioxide and water. 
Due to Copper Carbonates high initial discharge capacity, copper(II) carbonate (basic) is being considered as a promising candidate as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

Copper Carbonate Applications
Copper(II) carbonate basic along with different ligands form an efficient catalytic system for ′on water′ β-borylation of Michael acceptors, alkenes and alkynes.
Copper(II) carbonate basic (Cupric carbonate basic, Copper(II) basic carbonate) may be used in the preparation of colloidal copper.

Sometimes the name is used for Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2, a blue crystalline solid also known as the mineral azurite. 
Copper Carbonate too has been used as pigment, sometimes under the name mountain blue or blue verditer.

Both malachite and azurite can be found in the verdigris patina that is found on weathered brass, bronze, and copper. 
The composition of the patina can vary, in a maritime environment depending on the environment a basic chloride may be present, in an urban environment basic sulfates may be present. 
Copper Carbonate is a water insoluble Copper source that can easily be converted to other Copper compounds, such as the oxide by heating (calcination).  
Carbonate compounds also give off carbon dioxide when treated with dilute acids.

Basic copper carbonate is usually available in various concentration. 
Special packaging requirements are available upon request. 

Copper Carbonate is often improperly called (even in chemistry articles) copper carbonate, cupric carbonate, and similar names. 
The true (neutral) copper(II) carbonate CuCO3 is not known to occur naturally.
Copper Carbonate is decomposed by water or moisture from the air, and was synthesized only in 1973 by high temperature and very high pressures.

Basic copper carbonate is prepared by combining aqueous solutions of copper(II) sulfate and sodium carbonate at ambient temperature and pressure. 
Basic copper carbonate precipitates from the solution, with release of carbon dioxide CO2:
2 CuSO4 + 2 Na2CO3 + H2O → Cu2(OH)2CO3 + 2 Na2SO4 + CO2

Basic copper carbonate can also be prepared by reacting aqueous solutions of copper(II) sulfate and sodium bicarbonate at ambient conditions. 
Basic copper carbonate precipitates from the solution, again with release of carbon dioxide:
2 CuSO4 + 4 NaHCO3 → Cu2(OH)2CO3 + 2 Na2SO4 + 3 CO2 + H2O

CAS Number: 12069-69-1 
ChemSpider: 23796
ECHA InfoCard: 100.031.909
PubChem CID: 25503
UNII: GIK928GH0Y 
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID1047077

Also known as cupric carbonate, Copper Carbonate is a blue-green compound forming a part of the verdigris patina that is found on weathered brass, bronze, and copper.  
Copper Carbonate was formerly much used as a pigment, and Copper Carbonate is still in use for artist's colors.  
The powder may irritate your eyes and can be toxic if swallowed.
Copper carbonate is green in color and is the most common source of copper oxide for staining bodies and glazes. 
This material is considered volatile during firing and thus can affect the color of other pieces in the firing. 
The carbonate form disperses better than the oxide and creates less speckling, but outgasses more in the firing.

Copper Carbonate Preparation
Reactions that may be expected to yield CuCO3, such as mixing solutions of copper(II) sulfate CuSO4 and sodium carbonate Na2CO3 in ambient conditions, yield instead a basic carbonate and CO2, due to the great affinity of the Cu2+ ion for the hydroxide anion HO−.
Thermal decomposition of the basic carbonate at atmospheric pressure yields copper(II) oxide CuO rather than the carbonate.

In 1960, C. W. F. T. Pistorius claimed synthesis by heating basic copper carbonate at 180 °C in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide CO2 (450 atm) and water (50 atm) for 36 hours. 
The bulk of the products was well-crystallized malachite Cu2CO3(OH)2, but a small yield of a rhombohedral substance was also obtained, claimed to be CuCO3.
However, this synthesis was apparently not reproduced.

Reliable synthesis of true copper(II) carbonate was reported for the first time in 1973 by Hartmut Ehrhardt and others. 
Copper Carbonate was obtained as a gray powder, by heating basic copper carbonate in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide (produced by the decomposition of silver oxalate Ag2C2O4) at 500 °C and 2 GPa (20,000 atm). 
Copper Carbonate was determined to have a monoclinic structure.

carbonic acid, copper(1++) salt
carbonic acid, copper(2+) salt (1:1)
copper carbonate (1:1)
copper carbonate (CuCo3)
copper carbonate reagent
copper;carbonate
copper(II) carbonate
cupric carbonate
cupric carbonate (1:1)
cupric carbonate basic
cupric carbonate, basic

Chemical and physical properties
The stability of dry CuCO3 depends critically on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). 
Copper Carbonate is stable for months in dry air, but decomposes slowly into CuO and CO2 if pCO2 is less than 0.11 atm.

In the presence of water or moist air at 25 °C, CuCO3 is stable only for pCO2 above 4.57 atmospheres and pH between about 4 and 8.
Below that partial pressure, Copper Carbonate reacts with water to form a basic carbonate (azurite, Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2).
3CuCO3 + H2O → Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2 + CO2
In highly basic solutions, the complex anion Cu(CO3)22− is formed instead.
The solubility product of the true copper(II) carbonate was measured by Reiterer and others as pKso = 11.45 ± 0.10 at 25 °C.

Copper Carbonate (CuCO3) is formed after copper loses its electrons. 
The copper carbonate typically contains Cu + 2, known as the cupric ion. 
However, at times Copper Carbonate may have an alkaline component as the content.

What Is Copper Carbonate And Copper Carbonates Uses
Copper carbonate is a water-insoluble chemical compound. 
Copper Carbonate can be converted into other copper compounds by different methods such as calcination, where on the application of heat, Copper Carbonate gives oxide. 
Copper carbonate is used in several applications.

Metals and salt conversions:
Copper carbonate is very commonly used to convert the compound into copper salts. 
In the process, the mixture is first treated with a more vital acid. 
In the next step, water along with the carbon dioxide gas is added.

Vinegar, known as acetic acid, is mixed with carbonate to produce water, cupric acid, and carbon dioxide. 
Copper Carbonate is also used for various aesthetics and practical purposes. 
One of the prominent application areas is jewelry.

The metal conversion of copper carbonate is highly sought after in the industry. 
Copper Carbonate is precious and has numerous applications. 
Several processes are used to obtain the desired result, such as pulverization, conversion, sizing, and electrolysis.

Copper Carbonate as Coloring pigment:
Owing to the specific color of different compounds, they are used as colorants and pigments. 
In pure form, the combination is of mint green color.
A tinge of blue is obtained after the addition of alkaline components. 
These colors act as great coloring agents.

CAS Number: 12069-69-1
Formula: CuCO3 CuOH2
Density: 4.0 g/mL
Solubility: Acids
Synonyms: Cupric Carbonate Basic, Copper Carbonate Hydroxide
Shelf Life: 36 Months

Copper Carbonates are used as a pigment in products, paints, and varnishes. 
Copper carbonate is used in artist paints to obtain desired colors for which Copper Carbonate is also known with different names such as verditer and mountain green. 
Copper carbonate is highly demanded in fireworks and pottery glazes as pigment and colorant.

Copper Carbonate Applications
Pigment for paints and ceramics - Copper carbonate is used in pigments under the names mountain green, mineral green or verdeazzuro (green azure). 
While Copper Carbonate is not routinely used in modern bulk paints, Copper Carbonate is still desired for restoration and artists’ paints.
Ceramics and pottery applications call for copper carbonate in slips (2-8%) and glazes (<5%, if more than 5% is added, glazes often change to a metallic pewter). 
The pigment will normally give a green colour when fired, but alkaline glazes will create a turquoise, and reds are achievable with a reduction kiln. 
Copper Carbonate is not suitable for soluble glazes that will come into contact with food or drink as the copper can leach out.
Pyrotechnic flame colourant - Copper carbonate is often used as a blue flame colourant, sometimes written in formulations as Basic Copper Carbonate. 
Copper Carbonate is reported to be the best copper compound to use with ammonium perchlorate and will give excellent blue colouring to a high temperature flame

What is copper carbonate?
Copper(II) carbonate, also known as cupric carbonate, is a chemical compound. 
Copper Carbonates chemical formula is CuCO3. 
Copper Carbonate contains copper in Copper Carbonates +2 oxidation state. 
Copper Carbonate also contains carbonate ions.

What is copper carbonate harmful?
Toxicity Direct copper carbonate poisoning is rare. 
Chronic inhalation of copper containing pesticides produces pulmonary and hepatic toxicity. 
Ingestion - There are no reports of copper carbonate poisoning following ingestion.
Very small ingestions (milligrams) are likely to cause only nausea and vomiting.

What is the cu2co3?
Cu2CO3 is a light green powder at room temperature. 
Copper Carbonate is insoluable in water. 
Copper Carbonates melting point is 200 ̊C (392 ̊F), boiling point 290 ̊C (554 ̊F), density 3.9 g/cm3. • Cu2CO3 = Cu2O + CO2.

What is the use of copper carbonate?
Copper Salts: The substance can be converted into copper salts by mixing Copper Carbonate with a stronger acid. 
The resulting salt is complemented with water and carbon dioxide gas. 
Mixing the carbonate with acetic acid (otherwise known as vinegar) will produce cupric acid, water and carbon dioxide.

What do you get when you heat copper carbonate?
The heating of solid copper(II) carbonate is a thermal decomposition reaction. 
The addition of heat energy causes chemical bonds to break and the reactant decomposes into two products. 
This reaction is accompanied by a color change. 
The green copper(II) carbonate turns into black copper(II) oxide.

How does copper react with heat?
Heated copper metal reacts with oxygen to form the black copper oxide. 
The copper oxide can then react with the hydrogen gas to form the copper metal and water.
When the funnel is removed from the hydrogen stream, the copper was still be warm enough to be oxidized by the air again.

What is the color of copper carbonate?
Thermal decomposition of metal carbonates
Carbonate    Colour before heating    Colour after heating
Sodium carbonate    White    White
Zinc carbonate    White    Yellow when hot, white when cool
Lead carbonate    White    Yellow
Copper carbonate    Green    Black

How does copper react with acid?
Copper is an unreactive metal and doesn't react in normal circumstances with dilute acids. 
However, Copper Carbonate does react with nitric acid. 
Nitric acid is an oxidizing agent and the reaction is not the usual acid + metal reaction. 
The products are oxides of nitrogen instead of hydrogen.

Copper (Cu): 55.0 – 57.0%
Iron (Fe): 0.2% maximum
Chlorides (Cl): 500 ppm maximum
Sulfates (S04): 0.04% maximum
Lead (Pb): 70 ppm maximum
Cadmium (Cd): 70 ppm maximum
MEA Insolubles: 0.5% maximum

Agriculture and aquaculture:
Copper carbonate is used across a wide range of applications. 
Copper Carbonate is commonly used to develop compounds for the treatment of timber.

Copper carbonate is added to arsenic to produce acetoarsenite, which is popularly known as Paris green. 
Copper Carbonate is used as a wood preservative. 
Copper carbonate is actively used as an ingredient in animal feeds and is demanded continuously in animal fodder.

Fertilizer is the other product where the demand for copper carbonate is very high. 
Copper Carbonate is used to create different pesticides, insecticides, and fungicides. 
Acetoarsenite is used as an insecticide. 
Besides agriculture, aquaculture is also one of the major application areas. 
Copper Carbonate is used in controlling the unnecessary spreading of weeds.

Copper Chromite Catalysts Manufacturing:
Copper Carbonate is used in manufacturing Copper Chromite catalysts. 
The largest field (industrial scale) of applying copper chromite catalysts is the hydrogenolysis of fatty methyl esters in fatty alcohol production.

Copper Chromite is very active for the hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones to their corresponding alcohols, as well as nitro-compounds to the primary amines. 
Some applicators use Copper Oxide Black instead of Copper Carbonate to reduce reaction rate and control synthesis in the reactor.

Copper Carbonate Conclusion:
Copper carbonate is commercially used for veterinary applications. 
While high concentration can be toxic to humans, in minimal quantities, Copper Carbonate is used in cosmetics. 
From the food industry to pharmaceutical products, copper carbonate is used in a wide variety of applications. 

Linear Formula: CuCO3
MDL Number: MFCD00010976
EC No.: 214-671-4
Beilstein/Reaxys No.: N/A
Pubchem CID: 14452
IUPAC Name: Copper carbonate
SMILES: [Cu+2].[O-]C([O-])=O
InchI Identifier: InChI=1S/CH2O3.Cu/c2-1(3)4;/h(H2,2,3,4);/q;+2/p-2
InchI Key: GEZOTWYUIKXWOA-UHFFFAOYSA-L

Copper Carbonate is used as a blue coloring agent in pyrotechnics.
Although Copper Carbonates are not interchangeable with copper carbonate, other blue coloring agents are copper (II) oxide, copper (II) oxychloride and copper benzoate.

Basic Copper(II) Carbonate is an inorganic chemical compound with the chemical formula Cu2(OH)2CO3 and with a second more precise name of copper carbonate dihydroxide. 
Copper Carbonate is known as basic copper carbonate because neutral copper(II) carbonate is unstable and readily reacts with water in the air to form basic copper(II) carbonate.

Copper Carbonate Formula: 
CuCO3.Cu(OH)2

Copper Carbonate Synonyms: 
Malachite, Cupric Carbonate, Basic

Copper Carbonate Description: 
A beautiful light blue to deeper blue powder, which sometimes is used as a pigment. 
Copper Carbonate is used as a blue flame colorant in low temperature class compositions of the potassium (per)chlorate base or in compositons of the ammonium perchlorate base. 
The resulting blue is weaker than that using Paris green or CuSO4.

Sources: 
Pyro suppliers, ceramic supply store (used for glazing, ceramic grade copper carbonate sometimes might contain acidic impurities left from production and should therefore be tested).

Basic copper carbonate occurs naturally in two crystalline forms, blue (Azurite) and green (Malachite). 
Azurite and malachite have been used as gemstones and paint pigments since antiquity. 
They are prepared as pigments by careful selection, grinding, washing, and levigation. 
As coarsely ground particles, they give a deep opaque color, but when finely ground, the pigments give a lighter more transparent tone. 
Azurite and malachite are lightfast but are sensitive to acids and sulfur fumes. 
Basic copper carbonate can also be made artificially by coloring chalk with copper sulfate. 
The equivalent synthetic pigments, called Blue verditer and Green verditer, tend to have regularly sized particles with rounded edges.

Chemical formula: CuCO3
Molar mass: 123.5549
Appearance: gray powder
Solubility in water: reacts with water at normal conditions

Reactions
Basic copper carbonate is decomposed by acids, such as solutions of hydrochloric acid HCl, into the copper(II) salt and carbon dioxide.
In 1794 the French chemist Joseph Louis Proust (1754–1826) thermally decomposed copper carbonate to CO2 and CuO, cupric oxide.
The basic copper carbonates, malachite and azurite, both decompose forming CO2 and CuO, cupric oxide.

Chemical formula: Cu2(OH)2CO3
Molar mass: 221.114 g/mol
Appearance: green powder
Density: 4 g/cm3
Melting point: 200 °C (392 °F; 473 K)
Boiling point: 290 °C (554 °F; 563 K) decomposes
Solubility in water: insoluble
Solubility product (Ksp): 7.08·10−9

Copper Carbonate (CuCo3) - May yield green & turquoise in oxidation or red in reduction with a slight fluxing reaction.  
Copper glazes may tend to volitize at higher temperatures & affect the color of the pieces around them.  
Carbonate form is more toxic than the oxide.  
Conceptually, copper carbonate is CuCO3, however this form is not normally available in the market (copper carbonate basic is the article of commerce) so the powder should be viewed as a family of compounds.

Copper carbonate (CuCO3) is a green powder that is used primarily as a glaze or slip colorant. 
Depending on firing conditions and glaze formulation Copper Carbonate has the potential to produce shades of green, turquoise or reds (reds usually occur in reduction firings). 
Copper carbonate can also be applied by brushwork as a wash on bisqueware.

What happens when copper carbonate is heated? Mention the type of reaction.
When green copper carbonate{CuCO3} is heated it decomposes forming copper oxide {CuO} and carbon dioxide {CO2}. This is a decomposition reaction. Brisk effervescence of CO2 gas is released while heating. Decomposition reactions occur when heat is applied to a pure substance and the particles rearrange into two or more new products.
CuCO3 → CuO + CO2 (g)
The compound changed from a light green material to a black material.

IUPAC name:
Dicopper carbonate dihydroxide
Other names:copper carbonate hydroxide, cupric carbonate, copper carbonate, Greenium

Copper Carbonate – CuCO3 (m.p. 2100o F/1149o C) is the most common source for Copper Oxide and is used (2%-5%) as a colorant to produce greens, turquoise, and copper reds. 
Copper Carbonate has a fine particle size that enhances the production Alkaline glazes: turquoise in oxidation, and copper red in reduction. 

CAS Number: 1184-64-1 
ChemSpider: 13799
ECHA InfoCard: 100.013.338 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number: 214-671-4
PubChem CID: 14452
UNII: 9AOA5F11GJ check
CompTox Dashboard: (EPA) DTXSID6034471

Copper Carbonate Applications
Copper(II) carbonate dihydroxide is used as pigments and in treatment for copper deficiency in ruminants. 
Copper Carbonate is also used in pyrotechnics, in sweetening of petrol sour crude stock and animal and poultry feeds. 
Copper Carbonate finds application in some types of make-up such as lipstick. 
In analytical chemistry, Copper Carbonate is used as a reagent for analysis.

Notes
Incompatible with strong acids.

Cobalt carbonate is a fine grained material that gives more even distribution of colour than cobalt oxide. 
Produces an evenly textured blue glaze (1-3%) which is less intense than the oxide. 
Cobalt almost always produces blues, which may vary somewhat with glaze composition, high zinc glazes tending to give greenish blues (especially if titanium is present) and high magnesium glazes tending to produce lilac or pink hues. 
Cobalt is quite soluble in glazes, consequently Copper Carbonate has little or no opacifying effect in the amounts normally used (rarely more than 1-2%). 
Cobalt is an active flux and it may be necessary to take this into account when using Copper Carbonate in some glazes, as Copper Carbonate may increase their fusibility quite considerably. 
Like other raw oxides (or carbonates) of copper, manganese and nickel, cobalt may cause blisters or bubbles in some glazes due to changing oxidation state during the firing cycle.

Copper II Carbonate Formula
Copper II Carbonate is also referred to as Cupric Carbonate. 
Further, Copper Carbonate is essentially a chemical compound.  
The Copper II Carbonate Formula is CuCO 3. 
Further, Copper Carbonate is an ionic solid compound which consists of copper (II) cations Cu2+ and carbonate anions CO2− 3. 
Copper Carbonate is not that easy to be found because Copper Carbonate is quite difficult to prepare. 
Learn Copper II Carbonate Formula here.
Most commonly, the term of copper carbonate or cupric carbonate is referred to as a basic copper carbonate like Cu2(OH)2CO3. 
This occurs in nature in the form of the mineral malachite or Cu3(OH)2(CO3)2 which is azurite. 
Copper Carbonate is because of this reason that the qualifier neutral can be utilized in place of basic which refers particularly to CuCO3.

CUPRIC CARBONATE
Copper carbonate
Copper(II) carbonate
1184-64-1
copper;carbonate
UNII-9AOA5F11GJ
Carbonic acid, copper(2+) salt (1:1)
9AOA5F11GJ
Copper monocarbonate
Carbonic acid, copper salt
Copper carbonate (1:1)
Cupric carbonate (1:1)
Copper carbonate (CuCO3)
HSDB 258
7492-68-4
EINECS 214-671-4
Carbonic acid, copper(1++) salt
Copper (II) carbonate
CO3.Cu
cupric carbonate, AldrichCPR
SCHEMBL29678
DTXSID6034471
8464AF
MFCD00051038
FT-0624118
Q409630

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