STRONTIUM CARBONATE

CAS number: 1633-05-2
EC number: 216-643-7
Hill Formula: CO₃Sr
Chemical formula: SrCO₃
Molar Mass: 147.63 g/mol

Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) is the carbonate salt of strontium that has the appearance of a white or grey powder. 
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as the mineral strontianite.

Chemical properties of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is a white, odorless, tasteless powder. 
Being a carbonate, Strontium carbonate is a weak base and therefore is reactive with acids. 
Strontium carbonate is otherwise stable and safe to work with. 

Strontium carbonate is practically insoluble in water (0.0001 g per 100ml). 
The solubility is increased significantly if the water is saturated with carbon dioxide, to 0.1 g per 100ml.

Preparation of Strontium carbonate:
Other than the natural occurrence as a mineral, strontium carbonate is prepared synthetically in one of two processes, both of which start with naturally occurring celestine, a mineral form of strontium sulfate (SrSO4). 
In the "black ash" process, celesite is roasted with coke at 1100–1300 °C to form strontium sulfide.

The sulfate is reduced, leaving the sulfide:
SrSO4 + 2 C → SrS + 2 CO2

A mixture of strontium sulfide with either carbon dioxide gas or sodium carbonate then leads to formation of a precipitate of strontium carbonate.
SrS + H2O + CO2 → SrCO3 + H2S
SrS + Na2CO3 → SrCO3 + Na2S

In the "direct conversion" or double-decomposition method, a mixture of celesite and sodium carbonate is treated with steam to form strontium carbonate with substantial amounts of undissolved other solids.
Strontium carbonate is mixed with hydrochloric acid, which dissolves the strontium carbonate to form a solution of strontium chloride. 
Carbon dioxide or sodium carbonate is then used to re-precipitate strontium carbonate, as in the black-ash process.

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
The most common use is as an inexpensive colorant in fireworks. 
Strontium and its salts emit a brilliant red color in flame. 

Unlike other strontium salts, the carbonate salt is generally preferred because of its cost and the fact that it is not hygroscopic. 
Strontium carbonates ability to neutralize acid is also very helpful in pyrotechnics. 
Another similar application is in road flares.

Strontium carbonate is used for electronic applications. 
Strontium carbonate is used for manufacturing color television receivers (CTVs) to absorb electrons resulting from the cathode.
Strontium carbonate is used in the preparation of iridescent glass, luminous paint, strontium oxide, and strontium salts and in refining sugar and certain drugs.

Strontium carbonate is widely used in the ceramics industry as an ingredient in glazes. 
Strontium carbonate acts as a flux and also modifies the color of certain metallic oxides. 

Strontium carbonate has some properties similar to barium carbonate.
Strontium carbonate is also used in the manufacturing of strontium ferrites for permanent magnets which are used in loudspeakers and door magnets.

Strontium carbonate is also used for making some superconductors such as BSCCO and also for electroluminescent materials where it is first calcined into SrO and then mixed with sulfur to make SrS:x where x is typically europium.
This is the "blue/green" phosphor which is sensitive to frequency and changes from lime green to blue.

Other dopants can also be used such as gallium, or yttrium to get a yellow/orange glow instead.
Because of Strontium carbonates status as a weak Lewis base, strontium carbonate can be used to produce many different strontium compounds by simple use of the corresponding acid.

Chemical properties of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is a white, odorless, tasteless powder. 
Strontium carbonate's chemical makeup is: C 8.14% O 32.51% Sr 59.35%. 
Being a carbonate, Strontium carbonate is a weak base and therefore is reactive with acids. 

Strontium carbonate is otherwise stable and safe to work with. 
Strontium carbonate is practically insoluble in water (1 part in 100,000). 
The solubility is increased significantly if the water is saturated with CO2, to 1 part in 1,000. 
Strontium carbonate is soluble in dilute acids.

Preparation of Strontium carbonate:
Other than the natural occurrence as a mineral, strontium carbonate is prepared synthetically in one of two manners. 
First of which is from naturally occurring celestine also known as strontium sulfate (SrSO4) or by using soluble strontium salts by the reaction in solution with a soluble carbonate salt (usually sodium or ammonium carbonates). 
For example if sodium carbonate was used in solution with Strontium nitrate.
Sr(NO3)2 (aq) + Na2CO3 (aq) → SrCO3 (s) + 2 NaNO3 (aq)

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
The most common use is as an inexpensive colorant in fireworks. 
Strontium and its salts emit a brilliant red color in flame. 
Unlike other strontium salts, the carbonate salt is generally preferred because of its cost and the fact that it is not hygroscopic. 
Strontium carbonates ability to neutralize acid is also very helpful in pyrotechnics. 
Another similar application is in road flares.

Strontium carbonate is used for electronic applications. 
Strontium carbonate is used for manufacturing CTV to absorb electrons resulting from the cathode.
Strontium carbonate it used in the preparation of iridescent glass, luminous paints, strontium oxide or strontium salts and in refining sugar.

Strontium carbonate is also used in the manufacturing of strontium ferrites for permanent magnets which are used in loud speakers and door magnets.
Because of Strontium carbonates status as a weak Lewis base, strontium carbonate can be used to produce many different strontium compounds by simple use of the corresponding acid.

Microbial precipitation of Strontium carbonate:
The cyanobacteria Calothrix, Synechococcus and Gloeocapsa can precipitate strontian calcite in groundwater. 
The strontium exists as strontianite in solid solution within the host calcite with the strontium content of up to one percent.

Strontium Carbonate is a water insoluble Strontium source that can easily be converted to other Strontium compounds, such as the oxide by heating (calcination). 
Carbonate compounds also give off carbon dioxide when treated with dilute acids. 
Strontium Carbonate is generally immediately available in most volumes. 
Ultra high purity and high purity compositions improve both optical quality and usefulness as scientific standards. 
Nanoscale elemental powders and suspensions, as alternative high surface area forms, may be considered. 

IUPAC name:
Strontium carbonate

Other names:
Strontianite

Properties and Applications of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate, whose chemical formula is SrCO3, is a fine, white powder whose properties are similar to those of calcium carbonate (lime). 
SrCO3 is very little soluble in water; it dissolves in acids, for example in hydrochloric acid, developing carbon dioxide as follows: 
SrCO3 + 2 HCl -> SrCl2 + H2O + CO2. 

Strontium is in the group of the alkaline earth metals. 
Strontium carbonate is non-toxic just like calcium, which is in the same group. 
The chemical similarity of strontium and calcium, however, accounts for the fact that the radioactive strontium isotopes that formed during the Chernobyl reactor accident have been able to deposit in the bones to trigger cancer.

Strontium carbonate, among other things, is used for manufacturing ferrite magnets that serve to extract strontium ferrite. 
Strontium carbonates main application is the production of glass for cathode ray tubes, better known as (color) television tubes. 
Since strontium carbonate has a relatively large atomic radius, it absorbs the X-radiation that occurs in the tubes. 

Through addition of SrCO3 and other compounds, the X-radiation disappears almost completely. 
Strontium carbonate is due to today’s LCD and plasma screens, however, that the production of cathode ray tubes is more and more decreasing. 
Strontium carbonate is also used in glazings. 
Pyrotechnics rely on the chromophoric salts of strontium to give flames their crimson color

In medicine, strontium was formerly used sometimes to treat schizophrenia. 
Today, Strontium carbonate is used as homeopathic “strontium carbonicum” to treat e.g., arthrosis and cerebral sclerosis.

Strontium carbonate is not self-inflammable as nanometer-sized powder. 
Also as a mixture with air (dust) under the influence of an ignition source, Strontium carbonate is not inflammable, so there is no possibility of a dust explosion.

Occurrence of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as the mineral strontianite which is one of the main sources for the exploitation of strontium. 
Strontianite is extracted both in open cast and underground mining. 
Strontium is named after the mineral strontianite which, in turn, is named after the location of Strontian, Scotland, where the first strontium mineral was discovered.

CAS Number: 1633-05-2 
ChemSpider: 14666
ECHA InfoCard: 100.015.131  
EC Number: 216-643-7
PubChem CID: 15407
RTECS number: WK8305000
UNII: 41YPU4MMCA  
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID3029651

Strontium Carbonate, SrCO3 is a white/grey carbonate salt powder that is, like most carbonates, fairly nonreactive and soluble in acid but not in water.
Strontium carbonate can be prepared either by means of using celestite (celestine), or by chemical means using strontium salts.

Strontium carbonate is used for several purposes in ceramics, glass, electronics, and fireworks (pyrotechnics). 
Strontium carbonate is useful in the creation of other strontium compounds, which can be easily made by dissolving the strontium carbonate in the corresponding acid. 
For example, strontium chloride can be made by dissolving strontium carbonate in hydrochloric acid.

Ceramics:
Strontium carbonate can be used to create matte glazes and acts as a flux. 
Strontium carbonate reacts and alters the colors of other metal oxides in glazes.

Additional Notes:
* Strontium carbonate can be found as the mineral stontainite.
* Emits a red flame when burned.
* Strontium carbonate only has one stable form therefore the temperature of precipitation does not effect the crystal form

Strontium, an alkaline earth metal, ranks 15th in terms of abundance among elements found in the earth’s crust. 
Strontium carbonate occurs in the form of strontianite and celestine mineral ores. Strontianite is composed of strontium carbonate, while celestine is composed of strontium sulfate. 
These two are the only minerals that contain strontium in an amount sufficient to make its recovery practical. 
Strontium does not occur as a free element in nature, due to its high reactivity to air and water. 
Strontium carbonate exists in the form of its compounds, majorly as carbonate and sulfate salts.

Strontium carbonate is the carbonate salt of strontium with chemical formula SrCO3. 
Strontium carbonate appears in the form of white or grey powder. 
Strontium carbonate occurs in the form of strontianite mineral deposits in nature; however, only a few deposits discovered are suitable for development. 
Even though strontianite would be more useful of the two commonly found minerals (the other being celestine), as strontium carbonate is the largely used compound with a wide variety of applications; it is not available in quantities sufficient to make its recovery practical. 

Strontium carbonate is hygroscopic in nature i.e. it can attract and hold water molecules from the surroundings. 
This makes Strontium carbonate a highly preferred strontium compound. 
Another factor is low cost of production.

Strontium carbonate has a large number of applications including the manufacture of strontium ferrite for permanent magnets and preparation of luminous paints and shimmering glass. 
Strontium carbonate is also used in the production of strontium ferrite magnets which are employed in microwave devices, small electric motors, magneto-optic mediums, recording mediums, and in the electronics & telecommunication industry.

Strontium carbonate is individually used in fireworks, flares, and other pyrotechnics as a red colorant. 
When combined with copper compounds, it acts as a purple colorant. 
Refining of zinc with the help of strontium carbonate is carried out by using a specialized form of electrolysis known as electrowinning. 
Electrowinning is the process of electrodeposition of zinc from its ore, which is put in the solution through a process called leaching.

Being a weak Lewis base, strontium carbonate can be employed to produce different strontium compounds, simply by using the corresponding acid. 
Strontium chloride can be prepared by treating strontium carbonate with hydrochloric acid. 
The reaction between strontium carbonate and sodium dichromate yields strontium chromate. 
Strontium nitrate is typically produced by the reaction of nitric acid with strontium carbonate. 
The decomposition of strontium carbonate results in the formation of strontium oxide.

Strontium aluminate (SrAl2O4) and strontium chromate (SrCrO4), which are prepared from strontium carbonate, are used in the paints & coatings industry for luminescence requirements and anti-corrosive coatings, respectively. 
Strontium carbonate descendants such as strontium chloride, strontium ranelate, strontium acetate, strontium peroxide, and strontium nitrate are used in various drugs.

Strontium Carbonate Properties (Theoretical): 
Compound Formula: CO3Sr
Molecular Weight: 147.63
Appearance    : White powder
Melting Point: 1100-1494 °C (decomposes)
Boiling Point: N/A
Density: 3.70-3.74 g/cm3
Solubility in H2O: 0.0011 g/100 mL (18 °C)
Refractive Index: 1.518
Crystal Phase / Structure: Rhombic
Exact Mass: 147.890358
Monoisotopic Mass: 147.890366 Da

CAS: 1633-05-2, 
EC Number: 216-643-7, 
Chemical formula: SrCO₃.

Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) was formerly used in large quantities in the manufacturing of CRT TVs (CRT = cathode-ray tubes) as strontium carbonate together with other compounds absorbs and reduces significantly (to almost zero) the X-rays generated from the television tubes.
Nowadays, modern flat-panel devices have almost completely replaced these tubes. 
Currently, strontium carbonates are being used in pyrotechnics as colour-producing components – strontium produces a crimson red flame. 
The Latin term “Strontium carbonicum” refers to the homeopathic application of this material which is used to treat osteoarthritis and cerebral sclerosis.

How can I come into contact with Strontium carbonate?
Strontium salts are used in fireworks to produce crimson red flames after ignition and it is not possible to get into direct contact with airborne strontium carbonate nanoparticles during the burning process. 
Homeopathic administered strontium carbonate could be considered as a targeted approach for medical purposes but it is not clear if the medical products contain micro- or nano-scaled strontium carbonate or even a mixture of both.

Is there any risk from this material to humans and the environment?
Little information exists on the effects of strontium carbonate nanoparticles on humans or the environment. 
This may be due to the relatively small number of applications for this material.

Laboratory studies have shown that different cell types can take up strontium carbonate nanoparticles and high doses may lead to cell death. 
However, no harmful effects of strontium carbonate nanoparticles have been found in whole animal studies.
Regarding the environmental behaviour of strontium carbonate nanoparticles, there are currently no data available.

In recent years the use of strontium carbonate has been reduced drastically as flat-panel televisions have taken over the TV market. 
Contact with strontium carbonate nanoparticles could take place through the burning of fireworks or the intake of homeopathic medications. 
Up until now, no harmful effects of strontium carbonate have been found for the human body.

Both strontium carbonate and strontium itself are non-toxic. 
Radioactive isotopes of strontium were found after nuclear disasters in Chernobyl (former USSR, today Ukraine) and in Fukushima (Japan). 
As these isotopes are chemically very similar to calcium, the strontium isotopes can accumulate in bone tissue and the resulting radiation could then in turn also damage the bone marrow.

Chemical formula: SrCO3
Molar mass: 147.63 g/mol
Appearance    : White powder
Odor: Odorless
Density: 3.5 g/cm3[1]
Melting point: 1,494 °C (2,721 °F; 1,767 K) (decomposes)
Solubility in water: 
0.0011 g/100 mL (18 °C)
0.065 g/100 mL (100 °C)
Solubility product (Ksp): 5.6×10−10[2]
Solubility in other solvents: 
Soluble in ammonium chloride
Slightly soluble in ammonia
Magnetic susceptibility (χ): −47.0·10−6 cm3/mol
Refractive index (nD): 1.518

Strontium carbonate is the carbonate salt of strontium, with chemical formula SrCO3. 
Strontium carbonate occurs in the form of strontianite and celestine mineral ores. 
Strontianite is composed of strontium carbonate, while celestine is composed of strontium sulfate. 
These two are the only minerals that contain strontium in an amount enough to make its recovery practical. 

Strontium does not occur as a free element in nature, due to its high reactivity to air and water. 
Strontium carbonate exists in the form of its compounds, majorly as carbonate and sulfate salts. 
Strontium carbonate is a white or grey hygroscopic powder compound. 
Strontium carbonate is a tasteless and odorless white powder and is widely used in numerous industries such as electronics, metallurgy, chemicals, and glass. 

HS Code: 2836 92 00
Quality Level: MQ200
Synonyms: Carbonic acid strontium salt
Description: Strontium carbonate

Humans hardly come into contact with strontium carbonate. 
Studies show that stress only occurs in cells after high doses have been administered and that this leads to cell death.

Intratracheal (i.e. into the air tube or trachea) instillation tests were carried out within the project NanoCare. 
A particle suspension was instilled in the pharynx of the animals and different cell markers were analysed subsequently. 
During this experimental approach, the strontium carbonate particles did not reveal any biological effects.

In vitro experiments from the project NanoCare with two differently modified, well-characterised variants of strontium carbonate that were applied to human lung cells have shown that only high doses of at least 25µg/cm2 of the hydrophobic particles can cause stress in cells and a decrease in the cell vitality after 72 hours. 
No effects were caused by the hydrophilic variant with particles of almost identical primary particle size. 
No negative effects on the cells were observed during studies with ten different cell lines of different origins treated with up to 10µg particles/cm2.

Using the so-called vector model which displays some of the elementary cell effects, partners of the NanoCare project proved that SrCO3 has little or no effects at all. 
Excessive, overloading concentrations of at least 120µg particles per 106 phagocytes were observed to damage the cell function and lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Synonym(s): Strontium carbonate (SrCO), Strontium monocarbonate 3, Strontium(II) carbonate
Linear Formula: SrCO3
CAS Number: 1633-05-2
Molecular Weight: 147.63
EC Number: 216-643-7
MDL number: MFCD00011250
PubChem Substance ID: 24870778
NACRES: NA.23

About Strontium carbonate helpful information:
Strontium carbonate is registered under the REACH Regulation and is manufactured in and / or imported to the European Economic Area, at ≥ 10 000 to < 100 000 tonnes per annum.
Strontium carbonate is used by consumers, in articles, by professional workers (widespread uses), in formulation or re-packing, at industrial sites and in manufacturing.

Consumer Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used in the following products: coating products.
Release to the environment of Strontium carbonate can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures, manufacturing of the substance, formulation in materials, in processing aids at industrial sites, in the production of articles, as an intermediate step in further manufacturing of another substance (use of intermediates), as processing aid, as processing aid and of substances in closed systems with minimal release.
Other release to the environment of Strontium carbonate is likely to occur from: outdoor use, outdoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. metal, wooden and plastic construction and building materials), indoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. flooring, furniture, toys, construction materials, curtains, foot-wear, leather products, paper and cardboard products, electronic equipment) and indoor use.

Article service life of Strontium carbonate:
Other release to the environment of Strontium carbonate is likely to occur from: outdoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. metal, wooden and plastic construction and building materials) and indoor use in long-life materials with low release rate (e.g. flooring, furniture, toys, construction materials, curtains, foot-wear, leather products, paper and cardboard products, electronic equipment). 
Strontium carbonate can be found in products with material based on: metal (e.g. cutlery, pots, toys, jewellery), stone, plaster, cement, glass or ceramic (e.g. dishes, pots/pans, food storage containers, construction and isolation material), wood (e.g. floors, furniture, toys) and paper (e.g. tissues, feminine hygiene products, nappies, books, magazines, wallpaper).

Widespread uses by professional workers of Strontium carbonate:
ECHA has no public registered data indicating whether or in which chemical products Strontium carbonate might be used. 
Strontium carbonate is used in the following areas: printing and recorded media reproduction, municipal supply (e.g. electricity, steam, gas, water) and sewage treatment and formulation of mixtures and/or re-packaging.

Strontium carbonate is used for the manufacture of: chemicals, plastic products, fabricated metal products, electrical, electronic and optical equipment and machinery and vehicles.
Release to the environment of Strontium carbonate can occur from industrial use: as an intermediate step in further manufacturing of another substance (use of intermediates) and formulation of mixtures.
Other release to the environment of Strontium carbonate is likely to occur from: outdoor use, indoor use and indoor use in close systems with minimal release (e.g. cooling liquids in refrigerators, oil-based electric heaters).

Formulation or re-packing of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used in the following products: welding & soldering products, coating products and laboratory chemicals.
Strontium carbonate has an industrial use resulting in manufacture of another substance (use of intermediates).
Release to the environment of Strontium carbonate can occur from industrial use: formulation of mixtures and formulation in materials.

Uses at industrial sites of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used in the following products: pH regulators and water treatment products, coating products, non-metal-surface treatment products, metals, welding & soldering products, fillers, putties, plasters, modelling clay, inks and toners, paper chemicals and dyes, pharmaceuticals, polymers and textile treatment products and dyes.
Strontium carbonate is used in the following areas: printing and recorded media reproduction, building & construction work, municipal supply (e.g. electricity, steam, gas, water) and sewage treatment and formulation of mixtures and/or re-packaging.
Strontium carbonate is used for the manufacture of: chemicals, metals and furniture.
Release to the environment of Strontium carbonate can occur from industrial use: as an intermediate step in further manufacturing of another substance (use of intermediates), as processing aid, in the production of articles and manufacturing of the substance.

Manufacture of Strontium carbonate:
Release to the environment of Strontium carbonate can occur from industrial use: manufacturing of the substance and as processing aid.

Molecular Weight: 147.63     
Hydrogen Bond Donor Count: 0     
Hydrogen Bond Acceptor Count: 3     
Rotatable Bond Count: 0     
Exact Mass: 147.89035611     
Monoisotopic Mass: 147.89035611     
Topological Polar Surface Area: 63.2 Ų     
Heavy Atom Count: 5     
Formal Charge: 0 
Complexity: 18.8     
Isotope Atom Count: 0 
Defined Atom Stereocenter Count: 0     
Undefined Atom Stereocenter Count: 0     
Defined Bond Stereocenter Count: 0     
Undefined Bond Stereocenter Count: 0     
Covalently-Bonded Unit Count: 2     
Compound Is Canonicalized: Yes     

Description of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) belongs to the carbonate salt of strontium, which is found in nature as the mineral strontianite. 
Strontium carbonate can be applied in a variety of industries. 
At present, strontium carbonates are commonly being applied as an inexpensive colorant in pyrotechnics since strontium and its salts produce a crimson read flame. 
Strontium carbonate, in general, is preferred in fireworks, compared with other strontium salts due to its inexpensive cost, nonhygroscopic property, and ability to neutralize acid. 

Strontium carbonate can also be used as road flares and for preparing iridescent glass, luminous paints, strontium oxide or strontium salts and in refining sugar and certain drugs. 
Strontium carbonate is also recommended as a substitute for barium to produce matte glazes. 
Besides, Strontium carbonates applications involves in ceramics industry, where it serves as an ingredient in glazes, and in electric products, where it is used for the production of strontium ferrites to produce permanent magnets for loudspeakers and door magnets. 
Strontium carbonate is also used for manufacturing some superconductors such as BSCCO and also for electroluminescent materials.

Production Methods of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as strontianite and can be mined from its deposit. 
Strontium carbonate is, however, usually made from the mineral celestite. 

Celestite is fused with sodium carbonate at elevated temperatures or boiled with a solution of ammonium carbonate:
SrSO4 + Na2CO3 → SrCO3 + Na2SO4
SrSO4 + (NH4)2CO3 → SrCO3 + 2NH3 + CO2 + H2O

Strontium carbonate is insoluble in water. 
Strontium carbonate precipitates from the product mixture in the second reaction. 
If fused with sodium carbonate, the product mixture is leached with water.
Insoluble carbonate separates from the watersoluble sodium sulfate.

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) is used to make radiation-resistant glass and TV picture tubes, as well as pyrotechnics.

Description of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate has the formula of SrCO3 and the molecular weight of 147.6326 g/mol. 
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as the mineral “strontianite”. 
The name strontianite comes from a famous location for the mineral, Strontian, Scotland. 
Strontianite is strontium carbonate as found naturally. 

Strontium carbonate occurs as white or slightly gray orthorhombic crystals with a refractive index of 1.518. 
The unit-cell parameters are: a = 5.107 ? , b = 8.414 ? , c = 6.029 ? , Z = 4; V = 259.07 ? 3, Den(Calc) = 3.78. 
The crystal system is orthorhombic with space group Pmcn and point group 2/m, 2/m, 2/m. 
Strontium carbonate has only one stable form (aragonite-type structure) and temperature of precipitation has no effect on crystal form, unlike that of calcium or magnesium carbonates.

Chemical Properties of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is a milky white free flowing powder. 
Strontium carbonate is little more insoluble (Ksol=10-8.8) than calcium carbonate (Ksol=10-8.07), so it should not be surprising that under appropriate conditions Sr2+ can be precipitated by biogenic carbonate.

Physical properties of Strontium carbonate:
White orthorhombic crystals; refractive index 1.518; hygroscopic; hardness 3.5 Mohs; density 3.5 g/cm3; insoluble in water; soluble in dilute acids with liberation of carbon dioxide.

Occurrence of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as mineral strontianite. 
Strontium carbonate is used in pyrotechnics and ceramic ferrites. 
Strontium carbonate also is used in making iridescent glass for color television tubes. 
Other uses are in refining sugar and preparing other strontium salts.

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate, SrCO3, is used in pyrotechnics and ceramic ferrites. 
Strontium carbonate is also used in making iridescent glass for color television tubes. 
Other uses are in refining sugar and preparing other strontium salts. 
The most common use is as an inexpensive fireworks colorant. 

Strontium and Strontium carbonates salts emit a brilliant red color in flame. 
Strontium carbonates ability to neutralize acid is also very helpful in pyrotechnics. 
Another similar application is in road flares. 
Strontium carbonate is used for electronic applications. 

Strontium carbonate is used for manufacturing glass colortelevision tubes to absorb X-rays resulting from the bombardment of the cathode rays on the glass enclosure of the cathode-ray gun. 
SrCO3 is used in the preparation of iridescent glass, strontium oxide or strontium salts and in refining sugar.
Strontium carbonate is widely used in the ceramics industry as an ingredient in glazes. 

Strontium carbonate acts as a flux and also modifies the color of certain metallic oxides. 
Strontium carbonate is also used in the manufacturing of strontium ferrites for permanent magnets that are used in loudspeakers and door-magnets. 
Strontium carbonate can be used to produce many different strontium compounds by simply dissolving it in the corresponding acid. 
Strontium bicarbonate has not been isolated.

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used in the preparation of?iridescent glass, luminous paints, strontium oxide or strontium salts and in refining sugar and certain drugs

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used for electronic applications. 
Strontium carbonate is used for manufacturing CTV to absorb electrons resulting from the cathode

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is used in pyrotechnics; manufacture of iridescent glass; refining sugar.

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) is used to make radiation-resistant glass and TV picture tubes, as well as pyrotechnics.

Definition of Strontium carbonate:
strontianite: A mineral form ofstrontium carbonate, SrCO3.

Definition of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate: A whitesolid, SrCO3; orthorhombic; r.d. 3.7;decomposes at 1340°C. 
Strontium carbonate occurs naturallyas the mineral strontianite andis prepared industrially by boiling celestine(strontium sulphate) with ammoniumcarbonate. 
Strontium carbonate can also beprepared by passing carbon dioxideover strontium oxide or hydroxide orby passing the gas through a solutionof strontium salt. 
Strontium carbonate is a phosphor,used to coat the glass of cathode-rayscreens, and is also used in the refiningof sugar, as a slagging agent incertain metal furnaces, and to providea red flame in fireworks.

Production Methods of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate, formed (1) by reaction of strontium salt solution and sodium carbonate or bicarbonate solution, (2) by reaction of strontium hydroxide solution and CO2. 
Strontium carbonate decomposes at 1,200 °C (2,192 °F) to form strontium oxide and CO2, and is dissolved by excess CO2, forming strontium bicarbonate, Sr(HCO3)2, solution.

Preparation of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate occurs in nature as strontianite and can be mined from its deposit. 
Strontium carbonate is, however, usually made commercially from the mineral “celestite”. 
Celestite is fused with sodium carbonate at elevated temperatures or boiled with a solution of ammonium carbonate.
Strontium carbonate is insoluble in water. 

Strontium carbonate precipitates from the product mixture in the second reaction. 
If fused with sodium carbonate, the product mixture is leached with water. 
Insoluble carbonate separates from the water-soluble sodium sulfate.

General Description of Strontium carbonate:
Strontium carbonate is insoluble in water. 
Strontium carbonate is used predominantly in producing other strontium salts.

Strontium carbonate is prepared by the process of reacting strontium nitrate in an aqueous reaction medium with carbon dioxide to precipitate strontium carbonate product, the nitric acid byproduct that forms being neutralized by the introduction of lime to the reaction medium.
Strontium carbonate is the most commonly used red flame colourant as it is insoluble and relatively unreactive. 
The strontium ion is not the radioactive isotope and so the material is perfectly safe from a radioactive perspective.

Strontium Carbonate is a very slightly soluble source of SrO used in ceramic glazes.
Strontium is considered a safe material. 
Some people confuse SrO with Strontium 90, an isotope released from atomic reactions; they are not the same thing. 

The raw powder is low-dusting and pleasant to work with. 
There is disagreement about when it decomposes (data sheets vary from 1075-1100C, one even indicates 1340C) as follows:
SrCO3 -> SrO + CO2

The 'Ceramic Industry Materials Handbook' states that it starts to disassociate as early as 800C in a purely oxidizing atmosphere, whereas a CO2 atmosphere might delay break-down until around 1220C. 
This information is supported by the fact that when the more stable calcium and barium carbonate are added to bodies, pinholing and blistering are greater than bodies containing strontium. 
Strontium carbonate melts and decomposes at the same time, 1100C.

Strontium carbonate is often recommended as a substitute for barium to produce matte glazes. 
Use about 75% as much and test first to make sure color response is the same. 
However, strontium is not a substitute for barium as a precipitator of soluble salts in clay bodies because it combines with SO4-- ions in the water to form a compound that is not nearly as insoluble as BaSO4.

Viscous zirconium silicate glazes can be smoothed with the addition of strontium carbonate.
As noted, strontium carbonate produces gases as it decomposes and these can cause pinholes or blisters in glazes (if they are being generated into a glaze melt having a viscosity and surface tension that is unable to pass them or heal over properly as they escape or one that simply does not have time because of quick cooling). 
There are strontium frits available (e.g. Fusion F-581 has 39% SrO) and incorporating one of them to source it instead of raw strontium carbonate (a classic job for glaze chemistry calculations). 

The resultant glaze will be more fusible and will have better clarity and fewer defects. 
Strontium frits have become much more common of late and are useful to producing brilliant transparent glazes without having a high expansion (like those based on Na2O and K2O). 
Please read the information about the oxide SrO to fully appreciate the value of SrO (especially when sourced from frits), not just as alternatives to this material, but as excellent ways to produce brilliant glazes.

Some pottery glazes have such high strontium carbonate percentages that a frit cannot supply the needed SrO. 
These are, of course, special-purpose formulations, having an SrO content that exceeds (or far exceeds) normal target or limit formulas. 
According to the Wikipedia article, while it does have a low solubility, this increases dramatically with temperature (about 50 times greater at 100C versus room temperature) and up to 100 times greater in the presence of CO2 in the slurry. 
Both of these factors play in glaze slurries (they can contain other carbonates that are disassociating) and thus indicate the potential to flocculate or deflocculate them.

FIRST AID MEASURES of Strontium carbonate:
Inalation:  Remove the subject from dusty environment and let him blow his nose. If symptoms persist, call a physician.
Eye contact:  Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water, also under the eyelids. If eye irritation persists, consult a specialist.
Skin contact: Wash off with soap and water. Remove and wash contaminated clothing before re‐use. If symptoms persist, call a physician.

Health effects:
Main effects:
‐Chronic exposure to the product can cause bone calcification disorders.
‐Product dust may be irritating to eyes, skin and respiratory system.
‐Possible risk of irreversible effects through inhalation.

Inhalation:
‐Repeated or prolonged exposure: chronic bronchitis, Risk of pulmonary overload (respirable particulates).
‐(in case of higher concentration): chemical pneumonitis.

Eye contact:
Contact with eyes may cause irritation.

Skin contact:
The product may be absorbed through the skin. May cause skin irritation and/or dermatitis.

Ingestion:
No reported cases of intoxication in man.

CAS Registry Number: 1633-05-2
Molecular Formula: CO3Sr
Molecular Weight: 147.63
Percent Composition: C 8.14%, O 32.51%, Sr 59.35%
Line Formula: SrCO3
Literature References: Occurs in nature as the mineral strontianite.
Properties: White, odorless, tasteless powder. d 3.5. Dec at 1100° into SrO and CO2. Sol in 100,000 parts water, in about 1000 parts of water saturated with CO2; sol in dil acids.
Density: d 3.5
Use: In pyrotechnics; manuf iridescent glass; refining sugar.

Strontium carbonate is a white, odorless, tasteless powder.
Being a carbonate, Strontium carbonate is a weak base and therefore is reactive with acids.
Strontium carbonate is otherwise stable and safe to work with. It is practically insoluble in water (1 part in 100,000).
Strontium carbonate is soluble in dilute acids.

The most common use is with chlorine donors to create red flames and in pyrotechnic compositions.
Can be said that Strontium carbonate is an inexpensive colorant in fireworks. 
Strontium and its salts emit a brilliant red color in flame.
Unlike other strontium salts, the carbonate salt is generally preferred because of its cost and the fact that it is NOT hygroscopic. Carbonates work as an acid reducer in chlorate compositions so it is also very helpful in pyrotechnics.

SPECIFICATION of Strontium carbonate:
SrCO3………. 98.0 % Min.
BaO………. 1.9 % Max.
CaO………. 0.17 % Max.
Na2O………. 0.03 % Max.
Fe2O3………. 0.006 % Max.
Total S as (SO3)………. 0.40 % Max
Insoluble in HCl………. 0.10 % Max.
Volatile substance………. 0.05 % Max.
Specific bulk density………. 0.50-0.70 kg/l
Bulk density tapped………. 0.90-1.30 kg/l
Sieve analysis:
Residue on > 45 microns 1.00 % Max.

Purity: 96% - 99.9%
Melting Point: 1497°C
Boiling Point: Unknown
Density: 3.7 g/mL at 25 °C (lit.)
Vapour Pressure: Not Applicable
Viscosity: Unavailable
Granulometry: 0.74 ‐ 10 μm (powder)

Product Description of Strontium carbonate:
We are one of the well-known manufacturers and suppliers of Strontium Carbonate. 
The offered strontium carbonate is found in powder form. 
Our supplied strontium carbonate is very commonly used in the preparation of pigments, luminous paints, explosives and permanent magnets. 
The offered strontium carbonate is easily available at very affordable market selling price.

Features of Strontium carbonate:
Grey color
Tasteless
Odorless compound

Uses of Strontium carbonate:
Preparation of Strontium Salts, pigments
Iridescent glass, luminous paints
Inexpensive colorant for fireworks, electronic appliances
Flux for welding rods, production of ferrite for permanent magnets and in the zinc electrolysis

Strontium carbonate is the strontium salt with a chemical formula SrCO3. 
Strontium carbonate appears as whitish powder. 
Strontium carbonate exists in the form of naturally occurring strontianite mineral deposits; but only a few discovered deposits are suitable for growth.

Specifications:
Formula: SrCO3
M.W.: 147.63
CAS No.: 1633-05-2
Strontium Sulphate: 99.0% Min
Grade: Precipitated
Free Iron (Fe): 0.01 % max
Free Chlorides: 0.05 % max
Free Sulfides as S: 0.05 % Max
Barium: 0.05 % Max
Bulk Density: 1.2 to 1.5 Kg/l
PH Value: 5 -7

Strontium Carbonate is commonly used with chlorine donors to create red flames and in pyrotechnic compositions. 
Carbonates work as an acid reducer in chlorate compositions.
Although they are not interchangeable with Strontium Carbonate, other red coloring agents are strontium sulfate, the oxidizer strontium nitrate, and the salt strontium chloride.

The formation of strontium hexaferrite SRFE 12 O 19 from pure iron oxide and strontium carbonate has been studied by means of dynamic high temperature X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and thermogravimetry. 
The formation in air passes through two endothermal reactions: SrCo 3 +6α-Fe 2 O 3 +(0.5-x) \frac{1}{2} O 2 → SrCo 3 +5.5α-Fe 2 O 3 +CO 2 (A) SrFeO 3-x +5.5α-Fe 2 O 3 → SrFe 12 O 19 +(0.5-x) \frac{1}{2} O 2 (B) The solid state reaction of the formation of the perovskite SrFeO 3-x starts between 660 C (0.13°/min) and 730 C (20°/min) depending on the heating rate. 
Above 810 C or 1000 C, resp., the perovskite reacts with the excess iron oxide forming the hexaferrite. 
During the process a part of the iron becomes tetravalent and is again reduced into the trivalent state. 
The phase Sr 7 Fe 10 O 22 or Sr 4 Fe 6 O 13 , resp., observed in quenched samples could not be detected during the formation in air.

Purity: 95%
Appearance    : Milky white free flowing powder
Synonyms: STRONTIUM CARBONATE; STRONTIUM (II) CARBONATE; Carbonicacid,strontiumsalt(1:1); ci77837; strontianite; strontiumcarbonate(srco3); strontiumcarbonate,granular; Strontium carbonate (low alkali and heavy metals) (99.9%-Sr)
Storage: Store Strontium carbonate in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dry location. Keep tightly sealed when not in use.

Other Details:
Strontium carbonate is white grayish in color and is a tasteless and odorless stable compound.
Strontium carbonate is formed with the combination of strontium and carbon derivative.

CAS number: 1633-05-2
EC number: 216-643-7
Hill Formula: SrCO3
Molar Mass: 147.63 g/mol
Assay: > 98%
Form: Powder
Density: 3.7 g/mL at 25 °C(lit.)

In this study, the conversion of Celestite to SrCO3 was studied by wet mechanochemical synthesis in a high-energy ball mill and treatment with Na2CO3. 
For this purpose, solid strontium carbonate and soluble Na2SO4 were obtained after wet milling of Celestite powder and sodium carbonate. 
The solid phase was washed with water at room temperature by filter pressing. 
X-Ray diffraction patterns showed that the SrCO3 nanopowder was synthesized and conversion boosted with increasing the milling time up to 8 hours.

Also, Rietveld refinement analysis was used to calculate the fraction of SrCO3 as well as structural properties of synthesized samples. 
It was found that initial Celestite could be converted to strontium carbonate with a purity more than 98% using high-energy milling without simultaneous heating. 
The optimum milling time was determined as 4 hours resulting in formation of nanopowders with an average particle size around 90 nm. 
Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), clearly showed the nanoscale structure of the synthesized powders.

STRONTIUM CARBONATE
1633-05-2
Carbonic acid, strontium salt (1:1)
strontium;carbonate
UNII-41YPU4MMCA
Strontium carbonate (SrCO3)
Strontianite
41YPU4MMCA
Carbonic acid strontium salt (1:1)
MFCD00011250
C.I. 77837
Strontium Carbonate Nanoparticles
Strontium, Reference Standard Solution
CCRIS 3203
HSDB 5845
EINECS 216-643-7
NSC 112224
CI 77837
CO3Sr
SrCO3
DSSTox_CID_9651
Strontium Carbonate Powder
EC 216-643-7
DSSTox_RID_78795
DSSTox_GSID_29651
SCHEMBL48480
Strontium Carbonate Submicron
Strontium carbonate, >=98%
CHEMBL3188467
DTXSID3029651
Strontium carbonate, technical grade
Tox21_202776
Strontium carbonate, p.a., 97.0%
AKOS015836320
NCGC00260323-01
Strontium carbonate, puriss., >=97.0%
CAS-1633-05-2
FT-0688133
V0376
Q413629
Strontium carbonate (low alkali and heavy metals)
Strontium carbonate, >=99.9% trace metals basis
Strontium carbonate, 99.995% trace metals basis
J-010031
Strontium carbonate, NIST(R) SRM(R) 987, isotopic standard
1633-05-2 [RN]
216-643-7 [EINECS]
Carbonate de strontium [French] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
Carbonic acid, strontium salt (1:1) [ACD/Index Name]
MFCD00011250
Strontium carbonate [ACD/IUPAC Name] [Wiki]
Strontiumcarbonat [German] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
[1633-05-2] [RN]
1633-55-2 [RN]
216-643-7MFCD00011250
774475-32-0 [RN]
Carbonate [ACD/IUPAC Name] [Wiki]
carbonic acid strontium salt
Carbonic acid strontium salt (1:1)
CARBONIC ACID, STRONTIUM SALT
EINECS 216-643-7
Formic-14C acid(6CI,7CI,8CI,9CI)
srco3
Strontianite [Wiki]
Strontium [ACD/Index Name] [ACD/IUPAC Name] [Wiki]
Strontium carbonate (SrCO)
Strontium carbonate (SrCO3)
Strontium Carbonate Nanoparticles
strontium carbonate, powder, purified
strontium carbonate, powder, reagent
strontium carbonate, puratronic
STRONTIUM CARBONATE|STRONTIUM(2+) CARBONATE
Strontium monocarbonate 3
Strontium(II) carbonate
strontium;carbonate
strontiumcarbonate
碳酸锶 [Chinese]

Regulatory process names:
Strontium carbonate
strontium carbonate

CAS names:
Carbonic acid, strontium salt (1:1)

IUPAC names:
strontium (2+) carbonate
Strontium Carbonate
Strontium carbonate
strontium carbonate
Strontium carbonate
strontium carbonate
strontium carbonate; LR election
strontium(2+) carbonate
strontium(2+) ion carbonate
Strontiumcarbonat
stronzio carbonato

Trade names:
Strontium Carbonate (Powder)

Other identifiers:
1633-05-2
7440-24-6
 

Bu internet sitesinde sizlere daha iyi hizmet sunulabilmesi için çerezler kullanılmaktadır. Çerezler hakkında detaylı bilgi almak için Kişisel Verilerin Korunması Kanunu mevzuat metnini inceleyebilirsiniz.