CETRIMIDE

CAS No. 1119-97-7.

It Consists of Trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide.

GRADES ATAMAN CHEMICALS OFFERS: 
Cetrimide Ph.Eur : 1119-97-7 
Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with ethanol : 1119-97-7 
Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with isopropyl alcohol:  1119-97-7 

 Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with ethanol
Also known as cetrimide, cetrimoni bromidum and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB),  Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with ethanol (CAS No. 1119-97-7.) consists of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 20%), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (approximately 70%) and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 10%). It also contains around 7.5% volume/volume (v/v) ethanol.

 Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with isopropyl alcohol
Also known as cetrimide, cetrimoni bromidum, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB),  Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with isopropyl alcohol (CAS No. 1119-97-7.) consists of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 20%) and trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (approximately 80%). It also contains around 7.5% v/v isopropyl alcohol.

Cetrimide = C17: Mainly Trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide +     ( C16: Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide + C15: Dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide ) 

Cetrimide is an antiseptic and disinfectant first aid medicine used for cleaning wounds and treating minor burns, scalds, abrasions, and even seborrheic dermatitis. 
It is also used to cure insect bites, sunburn and pimples. 
Several topical creams, solutions, gels, and sprays are composed of Cetrimide, owing to its bactericidal properties. 
Additionally, Cetrimide is also used to sterilize surgical and medical instruments
Cetrimide is a quaternary ammonium compound. Cetrimide was first introduced as a combined cleanser and skin antiseptic by Barnes (1942). 
Cetrimide combines excellent detergent properties and minimal toxicity with a useful antiseptic action. 
Cetrimide affects membrane permeability allowing ‘leaking’ of essential cell constituents leading to cell death. 
This medication is a skin antiseptic and disinfectant prescribed for seborrhoeic dermatitis and wound cleansing. 
The cream has a bactericidal activity against gram-positive bacteria and incompatible with soaps and other anionic surfactants.


Cetrimide    
Myristyltrimethylaminium bromide    
Tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide

Alkyltrimethylammonium bromide

Cetrimide is a quaternary ammonium disinfectant, which is toxic to the endothelial and epithelial cells, and contact with the eyes should be avoided

Cetrimide is a mixture of tetradecyltrimethylammonium (mostly), dodecyltrimethylammonium, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium. 

Cetrimide is an antiseptic agent, meaning it has various antibacterial, antifungal and other antimicrobial properties and can be applied to skin or mucous membranes to avoid or minimize the risk of infection. 
Cetrimide is also a surfactant, meaning it functions as a detergent with cleaning properties.

As a pharmaceutical ingredient, Cetrimide is used in various products mainly for topical use in sprays, gels and creams for a range of purposes, including cleaning burns and wounds, for disinfecting skin before injections or surgery, and for treating fungal infections or nappy rash.


Uses of Cetrimide
To cleanse the wounds
Treatment of some skin disorders
To treat minor burns and to prevent infection in cuts, small bruises, chapped hands, and nappy rash

Compounds
Cetrimide: Mixture of
C17: Trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide
C16: Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide
C15: Dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide

CAS Number    
Cetrimide: 8044-71-1
C17: 1119-97-7
C16: 57-09-0
C15: 1119-94-4


Cetrimide, or alkyltrimethylammonium bromide, is an antiseptic which is a mixture of three quaternary ammonium compounds: tetradonium bromide (TTAB or MITMAB), cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), and laurtrimonium bromide (DTAB or LTAB).
Cetrimide was first discovered and developed by ICI and introduced under the brand name Cetavlon.
Cetrimide is used as a 1-3 % solution for cleaning roadside accident wounds
ICI also introduced Savlon, which was a combination of cetrimide and chlorhexidine. 
ICI later sold the Savlon brand OTC to Johnson & Johnson in May 1992

Cetrimide, a quaternary ammonium synthetic disinfectant has properties similar to that of cationic surfactants. The surfactant solution of cetrimide has emulsifying and detergent properties. Cetrimide also has bactericidal activity against both gram-negative and gram-positive organisms. However, higher concentrations are essential to kill the gram-negative organisms. The collective antibacterial and detergent properties of cetrimide make it advantageous in cleansing infected wounds. However, it is comparatively ineffective against acid-fast bacteria, bacterial spores, fungi, and viruses.

Surfactants have been used in the food industry for many centuries. Naturally occurring surfactants such as lecithin from egg yolk and various proteins from milk are used for the preparation of food products such as mayonnaise, salad creams, dressings, deserts, etc. Later, polar lipids such as monoglycerides were introduced as emulsifiers for food products. The growing food and beverage industry is anticipated to boost the demand for cetrimide during the forecast period.

Cetrimide Market: Segmentation

The cetrimide market can be segmented based on application as:

Pharmaceutical
Surgical
Veterinary
Food & Beverages
Cetrimide, an antiseptic agent, retains various antifungal, antibacterial, and other antimicrobial properties. The first famous brand where cetrimide was employed was Savlon. Cetrimide, an active ingredient can be applied to mucous membranes or skin to minimize or avoid the risk of infection. The compound is applied on the skin prior to injection. Cetrimide drugs are effective against minor wounds, burns, cuts, and abrasions, keeping the skin moisturised. Cetrimide is seldom used as an alcohol denaturant. It can be utilized on the scalp along with shampoo for treatment of a certain type of dermatitis to kill some bacteria, fungi, and viruses on the skin of the scalp. This in turn can be utilized against dandruff, oily scalp, and psoriasis of scalp. In the veterinary industry, the product is utilized as a germicide. Cetrimide is a surfactant and hence has other cleaning applications in the food & beverages industry and other end-use industries.

Cetrimide Market: Segmentation

The cetrimide market can be segmented based on form as:

Cream
Soap
Solution
Powder
Emulsion & ointment
Cetrimide creams are extensively utilized for wound healing and to treat skin related problems. Cetrimide is also used in the form of a mild solution to prevent infection. Cetrimide acts as a detergent and disinfectant when utilized in Cetrimide soaps for adults and children. The powder form of cetrimide is employed in the animal health industry. Cetrimide powder is also used in industries and hospitals for cleaning of surgical instruments, equipment, and surfaces. Cetrimide in the form of ointment is utilized as a detergent and antiseptic for sterilization of surgical instruments, and for cleaning of wounds. Cetrimide lotion can also be used against mycotic keratitis.

However, excessive usage of the product can lead to allergic reactions and can even prove fatal. Precautions must be taken on the application of cetrimide cream as it is incompatible with common soaps and other anionic surfactants. The effect of the drug on pregnant and lactating women is still unknown. Thus, it is recommended not to use this drug in these conditions. The common side effects of cetrimide such as skin irritation and redness, nausea, vomiting, and digestive problems are likely to hamper expansion of the market.

Cetrimide is an antiseptic that is applied to the skin or tissue to prevent wound infections and sepsis. It is used in ointments, creams, mouth rinses, plasters or powders. Cetrimide is also an effective preservative against bacteria and moulds in cosmetics.

Cetrimide is a bactericidal cationic surfactant used against Gram-positive bacteria.  It is freely soluble in water.

Cetrimide (CAS 8044-71-1) is a quaternary ammonium antiseptic and surfactant. It consists mostly of trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide (CAS 1119-97-7; also known as tetradonium bromide) with smaller amounts of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CAS 1119-94-4; also known as DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CAS 57-09-0). The European Pharmacopoeia requires that cetrimide should contain at least 96% but no more than 101.0% alkyltrimethylammonium bromides.

Historically, the  name cetrimide was used for a material consisting of predominantly hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, (CAS 57-09-0; also known as cetrimonium bromide,  CTAB, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), together with smaller amounts of analogous alkyltrimethylammonium bromides. Some of the safety studies were carried out using this "cetrimide" rather than the cetrimide currently specified in the Europeam Pharmacopoeia.

In veterinary medicine, cetrimide is used as a topical antiseptic at concentrations of up to 2%. 
It is also used as an excipient in an injectable antibiotic formulation intended for use in cattle, sheep and pigs. When used as excipient, the concentration of cetrimide in the formulation is around 0.25 mg/ml, resulting in a dose of approximately 0.01 mg/kg bw of cetrimide in the target species.

In aqueous solution, cetrimide dissociates to a biologically-active cation and an inactive anion. 
Cetrimide is inactive towards bacterial spores, it is effective against some viruses and has variable anti-fungal activity. The cation is also responsible for the surfactant activity.

Cetrimide has a chemical structure similar to that of acetyl choline. It is a partial agonist and has depolarising muscle relaxant activities. 
At toxic dose levels, paralysis of the respiratory muscles leads to dyspnoea and cyanosis. Central nervous system depression may also occur.

Cetrimide has been shown to inhibit the intestinal absorption of substances such as D-glucose, methionine and sodium butyrate in several animal species. 
Interference with glucose absorption has also been reported in humans; the pharmacological mechanism is not known but is thought to involve action on receptor sites involved in the absorption process.


Cetrimonium bromide and cetrimide

General information
Cetrimonium bromide and cetrimide are quaternary ammonium antiseptics, trimethylammonium derivatives, with similar structures. Cetrimonium bromide is hexadecyltrimethylammonium. 
Cetrimide is a mixture of tetradecyltrimethylammonium (mostly), dodecyltrimethylammonium, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium. 
They dissociate in aqueous solution, forming a relatively large and complex cation, which is responsible for their surface activity, and a smaller inactive anion. 
They are emulsifiers and detergents and have bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and, at higher concentrations, some Gram-negative bacteria.

Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC). Mean results in % or µg/ml.

Species : Cetrimide %

Range of control µg/ml
Candida albicans:  0.002
Corynebacteria amycolatum CCUG: 0.004 
Streptococcus dysgalactiae:  0.002
Enterococcus faecalis:  < 0.001 
Staphylococcus aureus MRSA:  <0.001 
Staphylococcus aureus: < 0.001 
Pseudomonas aeruginosa:  0.016 
Mycobacterium abcsessus: < 0.001 
Acinetobacter baumannii:  0.008 
Staphylococcus epidermidis: < 0.001 
Staphylococcus lugdunensis:   < 0.001 


CETRIMIDE     
LISSOLAMINE V    
CETRIMIDUM [WHO-IP LATIN]    
CETRIMIDE BROMIDE    
TRIMETHYLTETRADECYLAMMONIUM BROMIDE AND MAY CONTAIN SMALLER AMOUNTS OF DODECYLTRIMETHYLAMMONIUM BROMIDE AND HEXADECYLTRIMETHYLAMMONIUM BROMIDE


Description: A white or almost white, voluminous, free-flowing powder; odour, slight, characteristic. 
Solubility: Freely soluble in water and ethanol (~750 g/l) TS; practically insoluble in ether R. Category: Antimicrobial preservative. 
Storage: Cetrimide should be stored in a well-closed container. 
Definition: Cetrimide is a mixture consisting mainly of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide together with smaller amounts of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide.
Cetrimide contains not less than 96.0% and not more than the equivalent of 101.0% of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, calculated as C17H38BrN (relative molecular mass = 336.4) and with reference to the dried substance.

1119-97-7
Cetrimide
Myristyltrimethylammonium bromide
Tetradonium bromide
Tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide
MITMAB
N,N,N-trimethyltetradecan-1-aminium bromide
Tetradecyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide
TTAB
Myrtrimonium bromide
8044-71-1
Trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide
MFCD00011770
1-Tetradecanaminium, N,N,N-trimethyl-, bromide
trimethyl(tetradecyl)azanium;bromide
Trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide
MTAB
UNII-8483H94W1E
trimethyl(tetradecyl)azanium bromide
CHEBI:3565
Mytab
Tetradecyltrimethylammonium (bromide)
8483H94W1E
1-Tetradecanaminium, N,N,N-trimethyl-, bromide (1:1)
Morpan T
Quaternium 13
DSSTox_CID_24367
DSSTox_RID_80175
DSSTox_GSID_44367
trimethyltetradecylamine, bromide
Myrtrimonium bromide;Cetrimide BP; MTAB; Microcide II; Morpan T;
Alkyltrimethylammonium bromide
CHEMBL113150
Myristyltrimethylammonium bromide, 99%
Tetradonio bromuro
Tetradonio bromuro [DCIT]
Tetradonium bromide [INN]
Tetradonii bromidum
CAS-1119-97-7
Ammonium, trimethyltetradecyl-, bromide
Bromuro de tetradonio
Trimethylmyristylammonium bromide
Bromure de tetradonium
Tetradonii bromidum [INN-Latin]
NCGC00166121-01
EINECS 214-291-9
Bromure de tetradonium [INN-French]
Bromuro de tetradonio [INN-Spanish]
N,N,N-Trimethyl-1-tetradecanaminium bromide
Myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide
Cetrimide (JAN)
N-Tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide
ACMC-2099bx
(1-TETRADECYL)TRIMETHYLAMMONIUM BROMIDE
AMMONIUM, TETRADECYLTRIMETHYL-, BROMIDE
EC 214-291-9
SCHEMBL59988
Myristyltrimethylaminium bromide
DTXSID0044367
Tetradecyltrimethylammmonium bromide
HY-D0839
Trimethyltetradecyl Ammonium Bromide
Tox21_112327
Tox21_302067
ANW-16363
SBB060106
AKOS015907427
Tox21_112327_1
JC10043
MCULE-6081426921
VA10560
NCGC00166121-03
NCGC00255707-01
AK117184
AS-12887
DB-050409
B7620
CS-0014809
FT-0604996
ST51046346
(1-Tetradecyl)trimethylammonium bromide, 98%
C11279
D02164
T-6750
A802464
A839915
Q27106133
UNII-24QSH2NL8N component CXRFDZFCGOPDTD-UHFFFAOYSA-M

C14QAC
Catrimox-14
myristyl trimethylammonium bromide
TDTMA cpd
tetradecyl-trimethylammonium bromide
tetradecyltrimethylammonium
tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide
tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride
tetradecyltrimethylammonium hydroxide
tetradecyltrimethylammonium iodide
tetradecyltrimethylammonium mesylate
tetradecyltrimethylammonium oxalate
trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide
trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide
TTAB cpd


Cetrimide (CAS 8044-71-1) is a quaternary ammonium antiseptic and surfactant. It consists mostly of trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide (CAS 1119-97-7; also known as tetradonium bromide) with smaller amounts of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CAS 1119-94-4; also known as DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CAS 57-09-0). The European Pharmacopoeia requires that cetrimide should contain at least 96% but no more than 101.0% alkyltrimethylammonium bromides.

Historically, the  name cetrimide was used for a material consisting of predominantly hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, (CAS 57-09-0; also known as cetrimonium bromide,  CTAB, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), together with smaller amounts of analogous alkyltrimethylammonium bromides. Some of the safety studies were carried out using this "cetrimide" rather than the cetrimide currently specified in the Europeam Pharmacopoeia.

In veterinary medicine, cetrimide is used as a topical antiseptic at concentrations of up to 2%. 
It is also used as an excipient in an injectable antibiotic formulation intended for use in cattle, sheep and pigs. When used as excipient, the concentration of cetrimide in the formulation is around 0.25 mg/ml, resulting in a dose of approximately 0.01 mg/kg bw of cetrimide in the target species.

In aqueous solution, cetrimide dissociates to a biologically-active cation and an inactive anion. 
Cetrimide is inactive towards bacterial spores, it is effective against some viruses and has variable anti-fungal activity. The cation is also responsible for the surfactant activity.

Cetrimide has a chemical structure similar to that of acetyl choline. It is a partial agonist and has depolarising muscle relaxant activities. 
At toxic dose levels, paralysis of the respiratory muscles leads to dyspnoea and cyanosis. Central nervous system depression may also occur.

Cetrimide has been shown to inhibit the intestinal absorption of substances such as D-glucose, methionine and sodium butyrate in several animal species. 
Interference with glucose absorption has also been reported in humans; the pharmacological mechanism is not known but is thought to involve action on receptor sites involved in the absorption process.

Cetrimide was poorly absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract of rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single oral dose of 0.8 mg/kg bw 14 C-cetrimide (predominantly hexadecytrimethylammonium bromide). Plasma concentrations peaked at around 5 µg/l, 4 hours after dosing and declined to around the limit of detection 48 hours after dosing. Residues in skeletal muscle plateaued at approximately 5 µg/kg over the period 8-72 hours after dosing before declining.

Residues in liver and kidney peaked at around 125 and 50 µg/kg around 8 hours after dosing and fell to concentrations around the limit of detection 96 hours after dosing. 
8 hours after dosing, 80% of the administered dose was recovered from the gastrointestinal tract; 87% of this being in the gastrointestinal tract contents. 
2% of the administered dose was excreted in bile during the first 12 hours after dosing. 
After 3 days, 92% of the administered dose was excreted in the faeces and only 1% in the urine. 
Over 85% of the material in excreta was unmetabolised cetrimide.

Cetrimide binds strongly to collagen and keratin to form cetrimide : protein  complexes. 
Consequently there is no significant absorption after dermal application of products containing low concentrations of cetrimide.

 
As part of a teratology study, the amounts of 14 C-cetrimide were determined in maternal blood, liver, placentas, foetuses and foetal livers, 1, 8 and 24 hours after intraperitoneal administration to pregnant mice. 8 hours after treatment, 0,5% of the dose was present in the foetuses, 50% of this being in the liver, 3% of the administered dose was found in the placenta, 1 hour after administration. The concentration of radioactivity in the foetuses was <10% that found in the placenta indicating poor placental transfer.
Cetrimide was shown to be of moderate to high acute toxicity. 
The acute oral LD50 in the rat was 1000 mg/kg bw. 
The acute subcutaneous LD50 in the mouse was 75-80 mg/kg bw. The reported intraperitoneal LD50 values were inconsistent and ranged from 2-106 mg/kg bw in mice; the identity of the substance examined in these studies was not always clear.
Cetrimide was administered to groups of rats in the drinking water at dose levels of 0, 25 or 50 mg/kg bw per day for 21 days. 
There was a dose-related reduction in bodyweight gain and food consumption. No haematology, clinical chemistry or pathological examinations were carried out.
2 repeated-dose toxicity studies were carried out in mice using oral administration. 
The "cetrimide" used in these studies consisted predominantly of hexadecyltrimethylammomium bromide. 
In one study, mice were given daily oral doses of 5 or 25 mg/kg bw "cetrimide” in aqueous solution, 6 days per week for 5 months. 
Bodyweights and haematology values were monitored twice a week. The bodyweight gain was reduced at both dose levels and erythrocyte counts were increased in the group receiving 25 mg/kg bw. There were no substance-related pathological findings. In another study, “cetrimide" as the stearate, rather than the bromide, was administered in the diet at doses of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4% or 0.5%. Substance-related deaths occurred at doses of 0.05% and above. There was a dose-related reduction in bodyweight gain at 0.1% and above. 
Cetrimide had an effect on the mucosal cells of the villi of the pyloric, duodenal and jejunal regions of the gastrointestinal tract. Haemorrhages in the gastrointestinal tract from the pyloric region of the stomach to the ileum were observed at 0.4% and 0.5%. 
Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the duodenum and jejunum were observed at doses of 0.05% and above. No substance-related effects were observed in adult mice given the lowest dose level of 0.025% for 6 months (equivalent to approximately 35 mg/kg bw per day); however this dose resulted in significantly reduced bodyweight gain in immature mice. 
No results of haematology or clinical chemistry investigations in mice were reported in this study. 
The repeated-dose studies were inadequately carried out and reported and it was not possible to deduce a NOEL from these studies.
Cetrimide formulations were generally well-tolerated by the target species. 
However cetrimide was too toxic to fish to be of any value in the treatment of bacterial gill diseases.
Pregnant female NMRI mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 0, 10.5 or 35 mg/kg bw cetrimide (predominantly hexadecyltrimetylammonium bromide) on day 8, 10, 12 or 14 of gestation. There was no significant effect on maternal bodyweight gain. 
The numbers of dead foetuses were significantly increased in all groups given 35 mg/kg bw. 
There was a dose-related increase in the incidence of malformations, mostly cleft palate. The highest incidence of cleft palate occurred following administration on days 12 and 14 of gestation. 
Foetal bodyweights were also reduced following administration of the substance on days 12 and 14 of gestation. 
No NOEL was established in this study. No information was provided concerning possible reproductive effects after oral administration. 
The topical use of cetrimide in humans over many years has not been linked to any adverse reproductive effects. 
Products containing cetrimide are not contra-indicated in humans during pregnancy and lactation.
According to a brief published report, cetrimide was not mutagenic in an in vitro bacterial assay for gene mutation in Salmonella tlyphimurium TA 1535 and TA 1538. 
No carcinogenicity studies were carried out with cetrimide. Further data were not considered necessary due to the lack of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of the quaternary ammonium compounds.
In vitro MIC values were determined for a range for bacteria including some species which may be found in the human gut flora. 
The MICs for Pseudomonas spp. were in the range 600-1250 µg/ml, for Proteus species : 250-500 µg/ml, and for E. coli : 50-150 µg/ml. 
Over 100 different hospital strains of each of these species were studied. The antimicrobial activity of cetrimide was significantly diminished by contact  with biological materials such as protein  and blood. Consequently any potential residues of cetrimide in foods of animal origin will not have any significant effect on the human gut flora.
 
Cetrimide has been used extensively in humans since 1942. 
Most formulations are intended for topical use, for cleansing skin, wounds and burns and for the treatment of nappy rash and acne. 
The aqueous solutions and creams which are used as a skin cleansers and antiseptics contain in the region of 0.1-1.0% cetrimide. 
Concentrations in the range 1-3% are used in shampoos to remove the scales of seborrhea. 
Cetrimide is also used as a preservative in eye drops and in disinfecting solutions for hard contact lenses. 
The topical preparations are associated with an extremely low incidence of adverse reactions; there have been occasional reports of skin irritation and some patients become hypersensitive after repeated application.
No residues depletion studies were carried out with cetrimide. 
Cetrimide is not absorbed after percutaneous administration and so the topical use of the substance should not result in significant residues in foods of animal origin. 
The use of cetrimide as an excipient in injectable formulations results in a dose of only 0.01 mg/kg bw in the target species. Taking into account the low toxicity of cetrimide and its poor absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, it may be concluded that the use of cetrimide in food producing species is unlikely to result in residues in food of animal origin at concentrations which are toxicologically relevant for the safety of consumers.


Conclusions and recommendation
Having considered the criteria laid down by the Committee for the inclusion of substances into Annex II of Council Regulation (EEC) No 2377/90, and in particular that :
•    cetrimide is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is quickly excreted;
•    cetrimide is not significantly absorbed after percutaneous administration;
•    topically-applied cetrimide has a long history of safe use in human medicine;
•    the use of cetrimide in food producing species should not result in residues in food of animal origin at concentrations which are toxicologically relevant for the safety of consumers.
The Committee considers that there is no need to establish an MRL for cetrimide and recommends its inclusion into Annex II of Council Regulation (EEC) No 2377/90 for cetrimide in accordance with the following table:


Alkyltrimethylammonium bromide is a surfactant and can be used to study the forces and stability of foam films produced from soluble cationic surfactants.

Application
Alkyltrimethylammonium bromide has been used in a study to assess the adsorption of sugar surfactants at the air/water interface. 


Cetrimide extrapure AR (Tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide), 99%
(Tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide)
1119-97-7

Molecular Formula : C17H38BrN
Molecular Weight : 336.40
Part A
Storage : Room Temperature
HSN Code : 29239000
IMDG Identification :UN No.:1759 , IMCO Class No.:8 , Packing Group:III    
 
MSDS
Product Datasheet
Stock Check & Taxation Details
Enter Batch No. for COA
 
Online Certificate of Analysis
Cetrimide extrapure AR (Tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide), 99%
 
Specifications
 
Appearance (Colour)    White
Appearance (Form)    Cyrstalline powder
Solubility (Turbidity) 5% aq. solution    Clear
Solubility (Colour) 5% aq. solution    Colourless
Assay (NT)    min. 99%
Loss on drying    max. 1%
Sulphated Ash    max. 0.1%
Iron (Fe)    max. 0.001%
Heavy Metals (Pb)    max. 0.001%

Strong Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with ethanol
Also known as cetrimide, cetrimoni bromidum and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), Strong Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with ethanol (CAS No. 1119-97-7.) consists of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 20%), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (approximately 70%) and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 10%). It also contains around 7.5% volume/volume (v/v) ethanol.

Strong Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with isopropyl alcohol
Also known as cetrimide, cetrimoni bromidum, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), Strong Cetrimide Solution 40% BP Pharma with isopropyl alcohol (CAS No. 1119-97-7.) consists of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (approximately 20%) and trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (approximately 80%). It also contains around 7.5% v/v isopropyl alcohol.

COMPOSITION :
Cetrimide is a quaternary ammonium compound consisting of:
Tetradecyl – trimethyl ammonium bromide.
Dodecyl – trimethyl ammonium bromide.
Hexadecyl – trimethyl ammonium bromide.

PROPERTIES:
An exceptional valuable antiseptic and detergent effect against bacteria, fungi and algae.
The effect is intensified in slightly alkaline medium and in warm solution.
An efficient deodorant due to its bactericidal effect and its ability to react with odiferous substances.
Cetrimide, due to its high surface activity, is recommended for disinfection of both living tissues and inanimate surfaces.

DIRECTIONS: (For 20%, 17.5% solution).
Dilute with water before use, as follows:

GENERAL APPLICATIONS:
For cleansing and disinfecting of wounds, abrasions, burns, insects stings: Use 0.5-1% dilution.
For preparation of the operation site: Use 0.5-1% dilution in 70% ethanol or in 50% isopropanol alcohol.
For treatment of skin infections to remove exudates, ointments etc…: Use 1% dilution .
Cleansing and disinfecting apparatus and utensils etc…: Use 1% dilution.

DISINFECTION OF SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS;
Leave in 1% dilution for one hour; then rinse, clean and sterilize by heat.
For the sterile storage of instruments, use 0.1% dilution with 0.5% sodium nitrate and alcohol (6% ethanol or 4% isopropanol) added to prevent rusting.

OTHER APPLICATIONS:
Disinfection and mold contro l
*In very contaminated cases, use 1% dilution


Chemical name. 
Trimethyltetradecylammonium bromide mixture with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide; cetrimide; CAS Reg. No. 8044-71-1. 

Description. 
A white or almost white, voluminous, free-flowing powder; odour, slight, characteristic. 

Solubility. 
Freely soluble in water and ethanol (~750 g/l) TS; practically insoluble in ether R. Category. 
Antimicrobial preservative. 

Storage. 
Cetrimide should be stored in a well-closed container. 
Requirements Definition. 
Cetrimide is a mixture consisting mainly of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide together with smaller amounts of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. 
Cetrimide contains not less than 96.0% and not more than the equivalent of 101.0% of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, calculated as C17H38BrN (relative molecular mass = 336.4) and with reference to the dried substance. 

Identity tests 
A. Dissolve 5 mg in 5 mL of phosphate buffer, pH 8.0, TS. 
Dip a strip of methyl green/iodomercurate paper R into the solution. 
Similarly prepare a blank solution without the Cetrimide being examined. 
After 5 minutes withdraw the strip of paper from the tube; the solution to be tested shows a darker greenish blue colour than the blank solution. 

B. Dissolve 0.2 g in 10 mL of carbon-dioxide-free water R and shake; a voluminous froth is produced. (Keep the mixture for test C.) C. 
The solution prepared above yields reaction A described under 2.1 General identification tests as characteristic of bromides. 
Amines and amine salts. 
Dissolve 5 g in 30 mL of a mixture of 1 volume of hydrochloric acid (1 mol/l) VS and 99 volumes of methanol R and add 100 mL of 2-propanol R. 
Slowly pass a stream of nitrogen R through the solution. 
Gradually add 15 mL of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.1 mol/l) VS and titrate potentiometrically, recording a titration curve; the volume of titrant added between the two points of inflexion is not larger than 2.0 mL. 
Sulfated ash. Not more than 5.0 mg/g. Loss on drying. 
Dry at 105 °C for 2 hours; it loses not more than 20 mg/g. 
Acidity or alkalinity. Dissolve 1 g in 50 mL of carbon-dioxide-free water R and add 0.1 mL of bromocresol purple/ethanol TS; not more than 0.1 mL of hydrochloric acid (0.1 mol/l) VS or 0.1 mL of sodium hydroxide (0.1 mol/l) VS is required to obtain the midpoint of the indicator (grey). 

Assay. 
Dissolve about 2 g, accurately weighed, in 100 mL of water. 
Transfer 25 mL to a separating funnel, add 25 mL of chloroform R, 10 mL of sodium hydroxide (0.1 mol/l) VS, and 10 mL of a freshly prepared solution containing 5 g of potassium iodide R in 100 mL of water. 
Shake well, allow to separate, and discard the chloroform layer. 
Shake the aqueous layer with three quantities, each of 10 mL, of chloroform R, and discard the chloroform layers. 
Add 40 mL of hydrochloric acid (~420 g/l) TS, allow to cool, and titrate with potassium iodate (0.05 mol/l) VS until the deep brown colour is almost discharged. 
Add 2 mL of chloroform R and continue the titration, shaking vigorously, until the colour of the chloroform layer no longer changes. Repeat the procedure with a mixture of 10 mL of the above freshly prepared solution of potassium iodide, 20 mL of water, and 40 mL of hydrochloric acid (~420 g/l) TS and make any necessary corrections. 
Each mL of potassium iodate (0.05 mol/l) VS is equivalent to 33.64 mg of C17H38BrN. 

Cetrimide (Cetrimidum) Page 1 of 1 The International Pharmacopoeia - Ninth Edition, 2019 Cetrimide (Cetrimidum)


 

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