POTASSIUM CHLORATE

Potassium chlorate = Fegabit

Linear Formula: KClO3
CAS Number: 3811-04-9
Molecular Weight: 122.55 
EC Number: 223-289-7

Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, chlorine and oxygen, with the molecular formula KClO3. 
In Potassium chlorates pure form, Potassium chlorate is a white crystalline substance. 
After sodium chlorate, Potassium chlorate is the second most common chlorate in industrial use. 
Potassium chlorate is a strong oxidizing agent and Potassium chlorates most important application is in safety matches.
In other applications Potassium chlorate is mostly obsolete and has been replaced by safer alternatives in recent decades. 

Potassium chlorate has been used in fireworks, propellants and explosives.
Potassium chlorate has been used to prepare oxygen, both in the lab and in chemical oxygen generators.
Potassium chlorate has been used as a disinfectant, for example in medical mouthwashes.
Potassium chlorate has been used in agriculture as a herbicide.

Potassium Chlorate is a transparent, colorless crystal or white powder. 
Potassium chlorate is used as an oxidizing agent, and in explosives, matches, textile printing, disinfectants and bleaches. 

Potassium chlorate Uses:
Potassium chlorate was one key ingredient in early firearms percussion caps (primers). 
Potassium chlorate continues in that application, where not supplanted by potassium perchlorate.

Chlorate-based propellants are more efficient than traditional gunpowder and are less susceptible to damage by water. 
However, they can be extremely unstable in the presence of sulfur or phosphorus and are much more expensive. 
Chlorate propellants must be used only in equipment designed for them; failure to follow this precaution is a common source of accidents. 
Potassium chlorate, often in combination with silver fulminate, is used in trick noise-makers known as "crackers", "snappers", "pop-its", or "bang-snaps", a popular type of novelty firework.

Another application of potassium chlorate is as the oxidizer in a smoke composition such as that used in smoke grenades. 
Since 2005, a cartridge with potassium chlorate mixed with lactose and rosin is used for generating the white smoke signaling the election of new pope by a papal conclave.
Potassium chlorate has been used as an oxidizing agent, a disinfectant, in oxygen preparation, and in the detection of aluminum. 
This simple ionic salt can yield free chlorate ions in solution which is thought to be the species responsible for this versatile activity.

Potassium chlorate is often used in high school and college laboratories to generate oxygen gas.
Potassium chlorate is a far cheaper source than a pressurized or cryogenic oxygen tank. 
Potassium chlorate readily decomposes if heated while in contact with a catalyst, typically manganese(IV) dioxide (MnO2). 
Thus, Potassium chlorate may be simply placed in a test tube and heated over a burner. 
If the test tube is equipped with a one-holed stopper and hose, warm oxygen can be drawn off. 

The reaction is as follows:
2 KClO3(s) → 3 O2(g) + 2 KCl(s)

Heating Potassium chlorate in the absence of a catalyst converts Potassium chlorate into potassium perchlorate:
4 KClO3 → 3 KClO4 + KCl

With further heating, potassium perchlorate decomposes to potassium chloride and oxygen:
KClO4 → KCl + 2 O2

The safe performance of this reaction requires very pure reagents and careful temperature control. 
Molten potassium chlorate is an extremely powerful oxidizer and spontaneously reacts with many common materials such as sugar. 
Explosions have resulted from liquid chlorates spattering into the latex or PVC tubes of oxygen generators, as well as from contact between chlorates and hydrocarbon sealing greases. 
Impurities in potassium chlorate itself can also cause problems. 
When working with a new batch of potassium chlorate, Potassium chlorate is advisable to take a small sample (~1 gram) and heat Potassium chlorate strongly on an open glass plate. 
Contamination may cause this small quantity to explode, indicating that the chlorate should be discarded.

Potassium chlorate is used in chemical oxygen generators (also called chlorate candles or oxygen candles), employed as oxygen-supply systems of e.g. aircraft, space stations, and submarines, and has been responsible for at least one plane crash. 
A fire on the space station Mir was traced to oxygen generation candles that use a similar lithium perchlorate. 
The decomposition of potassium chlorate was also used to provide the oxygen supply for limelights.
Potassium chlorate is used also as a pesticide. 
In Finland Potassium chlorate was sold under trade name Fegabit.

Potassium Chlorate is used to make a variety of products. 
Potassium Chlorate finds a variety of uses, as:
• Basic raw material for the safety match work industries
• Bleaching agent in textile industry
• Oxidizing agent
• Used in dyeing Industry
• Paper disinfectant

Potassium chlorate is also known as Fekabit or Kaliumchlorat. 
Potassium chlorate is very flammable when mixed with combustible materials. 
Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, oxygen, and chlorine. 
Potassium chlorate appears as a white crystalline substance in Potassium chlorates pure form. 
Potassium chlorate is the most widely used chlorate industry.

The aqueous solution of potassium chlorate is a colourless liquid that is denser than water. 
Potassium chlorate could be toxic when ingested.
When Potassium chlorate comes in contact Potassium chlorate can irritate your eyes, skin, mucous membranes. 
Potassium chlorate has a cooling and saline taste.

Synonyms: Potassium chlorate
Linear Formula: KClO3
CAS Number: 3811-04-9
Molecular Weight: 122.55 
EC Number: 223-289-7

Uses of Potassium chlorate:
Potassium chlorate (also named chlorate of potash) was one key ingredient in early firearms percussion caps (primers). 
Potassium chlorate continues in that application, where not supplanted by potassium perchlorate.
Chlorate-based propellants are more efficient than traditional gunpowder and are less susceptible to damage by water. 
However, Potassium chlorate can be extremely unstable in the presence of sulfur or phosphorus and are much more expensive. 
Chlorate propellants must be used only in equipment designed for them; failure to follow this precaution is a common source of accidents. 
Potassium chlorate is used as an oxidizer in colored flame compositions, flash powders, and most commonly as the oxidizer in colored smokes. 
Contains 0.2% PCP anti-cake.

Potassium chlorate, often in combination with silver fulminate, is used in trick noise-makers known as "crackers", "snappers", "pop-its", or "bang-snaps", a popular type of novelty firework.
When mixed with other materials, Potassium chlorate may form a high explosive. 
The hygroscopic and slightly weaker sodium chlorate is sometimes used as a safer and less expensive substitute for potassium chlorate. 
In World War I, mixes of potassium chlorate with plasticizers (such as wax) were the most common type of plastic explosive used, often filling grenades and other munitions. 
When used in explosives as an oxidizer, the explosive is low order meaning Potassium chlorate burns rapidly rather than explodes. 
When mixed with a plasticizer, Potassium chlorate may become high order, requiring a blasting cap to detonate properly. 
Potassium chlorate is also used in some formulas of gunpowder, generally replacing the less powerful potassium nitrate.

Potassium chlorate is often used in highschool and college laboratories to generate oxygen gas; Potassium chlorate is a far cheaper source than a pressurized or cryogenic oxygen tank. 
Potassium chlorate will readily decompose if heated in contact with a catalyst, typically manganese (IV) dioxide (MnO2). 
Thus, Potassium chlorate may be simply placed in a test tube and heated over a burner. 
If the test tube is equipped with a one-holed stopper and hose, warm oxygen can be drawn off. 
The reaction is as follows:
2KClO3(s) → 3O2(g) + 2KCl(s)

The safe performance of this reaction requires very pure reagents and careful temperature control. 
Molten potassium chlorate is an extremely powerful oxidizer and will spontaneously react with many common materials. 
Explosions have resulted from liquid chlorates spattering into the latex or PVC tubes of oxygen generators, as well as from contact between chlorates and hydrocarbon sealing greases. 
Impurities in potassium chlorate itself can also cause problems. 
When working with a new batch of potassium chlorate, Potassium chlorate is advisable to take a small sample (~ 1 gram) and heat it strongly on an open glass plate. 
Contamination may cause this small quantity to explode, indicating that the chlorate should be discarded. 
Potassium chlorate is used in the oxygen-supply systems of aircraft, and has been responsible for at least one plane crash. 
A fire on the space station MIR was also traced to this substance. 
The decomposition of potassium chlorate was also used to provide the oxygen supply for limelights.

Uses Of Potassium Chlorate (KClO3)
Potassium chlorate along with silver fulminate is used in noise-makers such as snappers and crackers.
Potassium chlorate is used as an oxidizer in smoke grenades.
Potassium chlorate is used to generate oxygen gas in college and school labs.
Potassium chlorate is used in oxygen candles or chlorate candles.
Potassium chlorate is used in limelights to supply oxygen.
Potassium chlorate is used as a pesticide.
Potassium chlorate is used in growling gummy bears.
Potassium chlorate is used as a fertilizer as an effective alternative for ammonium nitrate.
Potassium chlorate is used in the manufacturing of paper.
Potassium chlorate is used in the production of matches.
Potassium chlorate is used in the making of explosives.

Potassium chlorate is used also as a pesticide. 
In Finland Potassium chlorate is sold under trade name Fegabit. 
Finland also used potassium chlorate as the main ingredient—approximately 60%—of a refined version of the Molotov Cocktail.

Potassium chlorate can react with sulfuric acid to form a highly reactive solution of chloric acid and potassium sulfate:
2 KClO3 + H2SO4 → 2 HClO3 + K2SO4
The solution so produced is sufficiently reactive that Potassium chlorate spontaneously ignites if combustible material (sugar, paper, etc.) is present.
In schools, molten potassium chlorate is used in the dramatic screaming jelly babies, Gummy bear, Haribo, and Trolli candy demonstration where the candy is dropped into the molten salt.

In chemical labs Potassium chlorate is used to oxidize HCl and release small amounts of gaseous chlorine.
Insurgents in Afghanistan also use potassium chlorate extensively as a key component in the production of improvised explosive devices. 
When significant effort was made to reduce the availability of ammonium nitrate fertilizer in Afghanistan, IED makers started using potassium chlorate as a cheap and effective alternative. 
In 2013, 60% of IEDs in Afghanistan used potassium chlorate, making Potassium chlorate the most common ingredient used in IEDs.
Potassium chlorate was also the main ingredient in the car bomb used in 2002 Bali bombings that killed 202 people.
Potassium chlorate is used to force the blossoming stage of the longan tree, causing Potassium chlorate to produce fruit in warmer climates.

CAS Number: 3811-04-9 
ChemSpider: 18512 
ECHA InfoCard: 100.021.173 
EC Number: 223-289-7
PubChem CID: 6426889
RTECS number: FO0350000
UNII: H35KS68EE7  
UN number: 1485
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID6047448

Other names
Potassium chlorate(V), Potcrate, Berthollet salt
Potassium chlorate (KClO3) is a strong oxidizing agent that has a wide variety of uses. 
Potassium chlorate is or has been a component of explosives, fireworks, safety matches, and disinfectants. 
As a high school or college chemistry student, you may have used Potassium chlorate to generate oxygen in the lab.
Because Potassium chlorate is a strong oxidizer, KClO3 must be kept from contacting organic matter; reduced inorganic materials such as elemental sulfur, phosphorus; and iodine; and concentrated acids.

The use of KClO3 in matches dates back to 1826, when English chemist John Walker combined Potassium chlorate with antimony(III) sulfide, gum, and starch. 
When formed into matches, the mixture sometimes (but not always) ignited when struck on sandpaper. 
Later on, white phosphorus replaced antimony sulfide to make matches more reliable. 
Eventually, the toxic white phosphorus was superseded by the red allotrope.

Modern safety matches contain no phosphorus; but red phosphorus is embedded in the rough surfaces of matchboxes. 
Upon striking, the phosphorus ignites, liberating oxygen from the match’s KClO3, which in turn ignites combustible substances (e.g., sulfur) in the matchhead.

Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, chlorine and oxygen, with the molecular formula KClO3. 
In Potassium chlorates pure form, Potassium chlorate is a white crystalline substance. 
Potassium chlorate is the most common chlorate in industrial use.

Formula: KClO3
Molar mass: 122.55 g/mol
Melting point: 356 °C
Density: 2.34 g/cm³
Boiling point: 400 °C
Appearance: white crystals or powder

Potassium chlorate is an important potassium compound that can be used as an oxidizer, disinfectant, source of oxygen, and component in pyrotechnics and chemistry demonstrations. 
You can make potassium chlorate from common household bleach and salt substitute. 
The reaction is not particularly efficient, but Potassium chlorate's something to keep in mind if you need potassium chlorate right away or just want to know how to make Potassium chlorate.

What is Potassium Chlorate? 
Potassium chlorate is an inorganic compound which contains one atom of potassium, three atoms of oxygen and one atom of chlorine elements. 
Potassium chlorate appears as white crystalline powder at room temperature in Potassium chlorates pure form. 
Potassium chlorate is also called potcrate and also known by Potassium chlorates trade names Fegabit or Fekabit. 
Potassium chlorate was discovered by French Chemist Claude Louis Berthollet in the end of the 18th century. 
At that time, Potassium chlorate was mainly used in fireworks but due to safety reasons the role of potassium chlorate in fireworks is almost over. 
Presently, potassium chlorate is banned for use in fireworks in most of the countries.

Chemical formula: KClO3
Molar mass: 122.55 g mol−1
Appearance: white crystals or powder
Density: 2.32 g/cm3
Melting point: 356 °C (673 °F; 629 K)
Boiling point: 400 °C (752 °F; 673 K) decomposes 
Solubility in water: 
3.13 g/100 mL (0 °C)
4.46 g/100 mL (10 °C)
8.15 g/100 mL (25 °C)
13.21 g/100 mL (40 °C)
53.51 g/100 mL (100 °C)
183 g/100 g (190 °C)
2930 g/100 g (330 °C) 
Solubility: 
soluble in glycerol
negligible in acetone and liquid ammonia 
Solubility in glycerol    1 g/100 g (20 °C) 
Magnetic susceptibility (χ): −42.8·10−6 cm3/mol
Refractive index (nD): 1.40835

What is the Chemical Formula of Potassium Chlorate? 
Molecular formula of potassium chlorate is KClO3. 
Potassium chlorate has cation of potassium and anion of chlorate which is shown below in Potassium chlorates structural formula as well. 

Potassium chlorate (KClO₃) is formed through electrolysis and crystallization, with final properties formed through grinding and sieving. 
Potassium chlorate is generally used in pyrotechnics and the match industry.

You only need two ingredients to synthesize potassium chlorate:
Chlorine bleach
Potassium chloride (sold as a salt substitute)
Filter paper or coffee filter

Take care to check the label on the salt substitute to make certain the ingredient is just potassium chloride.
While salt substitute is potassium chloride, "lite salt" is a mixture of sodium chloride (table salt) and potassium chloride. 
The reason this project works is because potassium replaces sodium in sodium chlorate. 
Basically, you need to make certain you are supplying the potassium.
While Potassium chlorate shouldn't be significant, keep in mind household bleach has a shelf life. 
If your bottle of bleach has been opened and stored a long time, Potassium chlorate's a good idea to get a fresh one for the project.

Properties of Potassium Chlorate 
Potassium chlorate has following physical and chemical properties –
In Potassium chlorates pure form, Potassium chlorate is a white crystalline solid. 
Potassium chlorates molar mass is 122.55 g/mol.
Potassium chlorates density is 2.32 g/cm3.
Potassium chlorates melting point is 356℃.
Potassium chlorates boiling point is 400℃.
Potassium chlorate is soluble in water. 
As the temperature increases, solubility of potassium chlorate in water also increases. 
Potassium chlorate is soluble in glycerol as well. 
Potassium chlorate is slightly soluble in acetone and liquid ammonia as well. 
Potassium chlorates oxidizing properties make Potassium chlorate suitable for ignition. 
Potassium chlorate is hygroscopic. 
Potassium chlorates crystal structure is monoclinic. 

Potassium chlorate is an inorganic salt in the form of a white crystalline solid. 
Potassium chlorate has many applications from use in cleaning agents, medicines, propellants, agriculture and various industrial applications.
Potassium chlorate can spontaneously ignite or explode when mixed with combustible materials so must be handled with care. 
Due to Potassium chlorates combustible nature, this product is the main component in the manufacture of various propellants and pyrotechnic products. 

Preparation of Potassium Chlorate 
Potassium chlorate is the most common chlorate used in industries. 
Due to Potassium chlorates various uses, Potassium chlorate is produced in the industries at large scale. 
For Potassium chlorates large - scale production Liebig process is used in the industries. 

Liebig Process – In this process potassium chlorate is produced by passing chlorine into hot calcium hydroxide and then adding potassium chloride in Potassium chlorate. 
Reactions involved are given below –
6Ca(OH)2 + 6Cl2 🡪 Ca(ClO3)2 + 5CaCl2 + 6H2O
Ca(ClO3)2 + 2KCl 🡪 2KClO3 + CaCl2

Other methods of preparation of potassium chlorate are as follows -
Electrolysis Method – Potassium chlorate can also be produced by electrolysis of potassium chloride. 
In this method, we take anode of carbon, platinum or mixed metal oxide and cathode of titanium. 
Both the electrodes are inserted in the aqueous solution of potassium chloride and a current is passed through. 
As the reaction progresses, potassium chlorate precipitates out. 
After the electrolysis, you can easily obtain the crystals or precipitate of potassium chlorate by removing the electrodes from the cell and then filter the cell contents. 

Disproportionation Method – For production of Potassium chlorate in small amounts, a disproportionation method is used. 
In this method, sodium chloride and sodium chlorate are formed by disproportionation of sodium hypochlorite. 
Then sodium chlorate undergoes metathesis reaction with potassium chloride. 
Reactions involved are given below –
3NaOCl(aq) 🡪 2NaCl(s) + NaClO3(aq)
KCl(aq) + NaClO3(aq) 🡪 NaCl(aq) + KClO3(s)

By Caustic Potash – Potassium chlorate can also be produced by passing chlorine gas into a hot solution of potassium hydroxide. 
Reaction is given below –
3Cl2(g) + 6KOH(aq) 🡪 KClO3(aq) + 5KCl(aq) + 3H2O(l)

Uses of Potassium Chlorate 
Initially, potassium chlorate was used in the fireworks industry to give beautiful colors to the fireworks. 
As Potassium chlorate is a strong oxidizing agent, Potassium chlorate produces oxygen on decomposition. 
Potassium chlorate helps in the combustion of fireworks. 
This high amount of heat excites the electrons and they produce beautiful colors in the firework mixture.  
But soon potassium chlorate was used in various illegal activities due Potassium chlorates explosive properties. 
So, presently use of potassium chlorate in fireworks is banned in many countries. 
Apart from this application, Potassium chlorate has various other uses. 

Few of them are listed below –
Potassium chlorate is used as an oxidizing agent. 
Potassium chlorate is used in preparation of oxygen. 
Potassium chlorate can be used as a disinfectant. 

Potassium chlorate is used in safety matches in a very small amount. 
Potassium chlorate is used in explosives. 
Potassium chlorate helps in early arrival of the blossoming stage of longan trees.
Thus, causing Potassium chlorate to produce fruit in the warmer climate. 
Potassium chlorate is used in firearms and percussion caps.

Potassium chlorate is used in propellants.
Potassium chlorate is used in combination with silver fulminate in trick noise makers such as snappers, pop – its, bang – snaps etc. 
Potassium chlorate is used in pyrotechnics. 
Potassium chlorate is used in smoke grenades. 
Potassium chlorate is used in laboratories as well. 

Potassium chlorate is used in chlorate candles or oxygen candles. 
Potassium chlorate is used in oxygen supply systems of aircrafts, space stations and submarines etc.  
Potassium chlorate is used in limelights (A type of stage lighting which was used in theatres and music halls in old time) as well. 
Potassium chlorate is also used as a pesticide. 

Molten potassium chlorate is used in dramatic screaming jelly babies, Gummy bear, Haribo and Trolli candy etc. 
Potassium chlorate has many applications and is a very useful chemical for many industries, but its explosive or oxidizing properties are being used in illegal and inhuman activities. 
Potassium chlorate is used in Afghanistan for production of improvised explosive devices which are used in many inhuman activities.

What is potassium chlorate used for?
Potassium chlorate is used in chemical oxygen generators (also known as chlorate candles or oxygen candles), used as oxygen delivery systems, such as airplanes, space stations and submarines, and was responsible for at least one airplanes crashing.

What happens to potassium chlorate when heated?
Potassium chlorate decomposes to potassium chloride and to oxygen gas when heated strongly. 
In the presence of MnO2 as a catalyst the decomposition is faster.

What is the difference between potassium chloride and potassium chlorate?
Potassium chlorate is a useful oxidizer, and Potassium chlorate is easy to use household chemicals to produce small quantities of Potassium chlorate. 
The addition of potassium chloride moves ions, precipitating potassium chlorate out. 
For this reaction to work the boiling is needed; you can’t just let the bleach evaporate.

Is decomposition of potassium chlorate a redox reaction?
Potassium chlorate thermal decomposition is not excessive, Potassium chlorate’s just a redox reaction. 
Disproportionation refers to the same product that functions both as an oxidizing agent and as a reduction agent, resulting in compounds that contain the same product in different oxidation states.

How does potassium chlorate decompose?
The thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate to obtain oxygen and potassium chloride. 
This reaction occurs at a temperature of between 150-300 ° C. 
For this reaction manganese(IV) oxide can be the catalyst.

Potassium chlorate immediately decomposes if heated in presence of a catalyst such as MnO2. 
Reaction is given below –
2KClO3(s) 🡪 3O2(g) + 2KCl(s)
If Potassium chlorate is heated in the absence of a catalyst, then on decomposition Potassium chlorate gives potassium perchlorate and potassium chloride. 
Reaction is given below –
4KClO3 🡪 3KClO4 + KCl
On further heating potassium perchlorate decomposes into oxygen and potassium chloride. 
Reaction is as follows –
KClO4 🡪 KCl + 2O2

Potassium chlorate (KClO3), as regulation medicament for longan production period, has been widely used in industrial application and enters the global ecological and environmental system. 
Potassium chlorates strong oxidation leads to certain pollution to ecological environment. 
In recent years, researches about ecological toxicity of KClO3 have realized considerable progress, so Potassium chlorate is necessary to make proper summarization. 
This paper makes an overview of researches about ecological toxicity of KClO3 to land plants, longan, aquatic organism, animals, and human beings. 
Finally, Potassium chlorate comes up with recommendations and prospects including further studying precise detection and degradation technologies for strong oxidation ClO3- and Potassium chlorates residue, strengthening biological monitoring and recovery technology of KClO3, and implementing wide science popularization.

Potassium chlorate (KClO3) is a highly reactive oxidizing agent commonly used in matchstick heads, explosives, flares, pyrotechnics, textile printing, bleaching and disinfectants. 
Acute ingestion of 5–10 g of a chlorate salt may cause life-threatening toxicity, including methemoglobinemia, cyanosis, hemolysis, diffuse intravascular coagulation and renal failure; universally fatal prior to the advent of dialysis. 
Effects of chronic low-grade exposure have not been reported. 
We report a case of otherwise unexplained chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CIN) in a patient with a history of chronic KClO3 exposure from matchstick ingestion.

Potassium chlorate Introduction
Potassium chlorate, an important salt of potassium widely used for manufacture of safety matches.
Potassium chlorate is also used in pyrotechniques, pharmaceutical industries and for other minor uses.

The major consumption of potassium chlorate is in the manufacture of safety matches.
The potassium chlorate content in match head composition varies from 50-55%. 
Generally, 6-8 kg. of potassium chlorate is used per 100 gross of match containing 144 boxes each. 
In pyrotechnics potassium chlorates may be mixed with certain organic compounds such as lactose to give a relative cool flame so that certain dyes may be incorporated in the mixture to give coloured flames. 
Potassium chlorate is also used in the explosive percussion caps, in pharmaceutical industry and dyes as oxidising agent.

Potassium chlorate Process
The manufacture of Potassium chlorate is carried out by electrolysis of aqueous acidic solution of potassium chloride. 
The electrolyte contains potassium chloride and potassium dichromate. 
Potassium dichromate is used for the cathodic reduction process of chlorate formation by an electrochemical reaction from hypochlorite. 
In general in well designed system, electrolysis of chloride is carried out by electrochemical oxidation of chloride to hypochlorite ions at the anode. 
Further conversion of hypochlorite to chlorate takes places as a chemical reaction. 
To achieve high current efficiencies electrolysis is carried out in specially designed electrolytic cells with integral reactors. 

Electrolysis shall be carried out with controlled pH at a temperature of 70-75 degree C. 
Electrolyte shall be continuously fed in parallel to all cells and from the cells, over flow shall be received in RCC tile/lined tanks from where the solution is cooled to 55-50 degree C in HDPE cooling tower by air. 
From the cooling tower basin the electrolyte flow through a series of crystallising pans which are RCC tile lined where the salt separates out and accumulates. 
From time to time the salt is collected manually by unskilled labour centrifuged and washed. 
The recovered salt from centrifuge shall be of required purity which shall be dried, pulverised and bagged. 
Mechanisation for conveying, choice of centrifuge and handling operation can be designed to minimise labour and supervisory requirement.

Properties and Specifications
Potassium chlorate, having a molecular weight of 122.56, is a colourless solid and soluble in water. 
Potassium chlorates solubility ranges from 3.3 gm at 0oC, 57 gms at 1000C in 100 gms of water. 
Specific gravity of KClO3 is 2.32 and melting point 3680 C. 
Potassium chlorate confirms to IS : 1987.

CAS Number: 3811-04-9
Formula: KClO3
Density: 2.34 g/mL
Boiling and Freezing Point: 400°C, 368°C
Solubility: Boiling Water
Synonyms: Chlorate of Potash, Chloric Acid Potassium Salt, Potassium Oxymuriate
Shelf Life: 36 Months

Potassium chlorate Production
On the industrial scale, potassium chlorate is produced by the salt metathesis reaction of sodium chlorate and potassium chloride:
NaClO3 + KCl → NaCl + KClO3
The reaction is driven by the low solubility of potassium chlorate in water. 
The equilibrium of the reaction is shifted to the right hand side by the continuous precipitation of the product (Le Chatelier's Principle). 
The precursor sodium chlorate is produced industrially in very large quantities by electrolysis of sodium chloride, common table salt.

The direct electrolysis of KCl in aqueous solution is also used sometimes, in which elemental chlorine formed at the anode react with KOH in situ. 
The low solubility of KClO3 in water causes the salt to conveniently isolate itself from the reaction mixture by simply precipitating out of solution.

Potassium chlorate can be produced in small amounts by disproportionation in a sodium hypochlorite solution followed by metathesis reaction with potassium chloride:
3 NaOCl(aq) → 2 NaCl(s) + NaClO3(aq)
KCl(aq) + NaClO3(aq) → NaCl(aq) + KClO3(s)

Potassium chlorate can also be produced by passing chlorine gas into a hot solution of caustic potash:
3 Cl2(g) + 6 KOH(aq) → KClO3(aq) + 5 KCl(aq) + 3 H2O(l)

Formula: ClKO3 / KClO3
Molecular mass: 122.6
Decomposes at 400°C
Melting point: 368°C
Density: 2.3 g/cm³
Solubility in water, g/100ml: 7.3  

Potassium chlorate is a white crystalline solid, which is forms a very flammable mixture with combustible materials. 
Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, chlorine and oxygen atoms, with the molecular formula KClO3. 
Mixture may be explosive if combustible material is very finely divided. 
Mixture may be ignited by friction. 
Contact with strong sulfuric acid may cause fires or explosions.

Potassium Chlorate is generally immediately available in most volumes. 
High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered. 
American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. 
Typical and custom packaging is available. 

A colourless crystalline compound, KClO3, which is soluble in water and moderately soluble in ethanol; monoclinic; r.d. 2.32; m.p. 356°C; decomposes above 400°C giving off oxygen. 
The industrial route to potassium chlorate involves the fractional crystallization of a solution of potassium chloride and sodium chlorate but Potassium chlorate may also be prepared by electrolysis of hot concentrated solutions of potassium chloride. 
Potassium chlorate is a powerful oxidizing agent finding applications in weedkillers and disinfectants and, because of Potassium chlorates ability to produce oxygen, Potassium chlorate is used in explosives, pyrotechnics, and matches.

Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, chlorine and oxygen, with the chemical formula K[ClO3]. 
In pure form, Potassium chlorate is a white crystalline substance. 
Potassium chlorate is the most common chlorate in industrial use, and is usually present in well-stocked laboratories. 

Potassium chlorate is used
Potassium chlorate is used as an oxidizing agent,
Potassium chlorate is used to prepare oxygen,
Potassium chlorate is used as a disinfectant,
Potassium chlorate is used in safety matches, and
Potassium chlorate is used in explosives and fireworks.

Molecular Weight: 122.55g/mol
CAS Number: 3811-04-9
Hazard: H271,H302,H332,H411
Precaution: P220,P273

POTASSIUM CHLORATE
3811-04-9
Fekabit
Kaliumchlorat
MFCD00011361
UNII-H35KS68EE7
H35KS68EE7
Anforstan
Salt of tarter
Potassium chlorate, 99%, extra pure
Potassium chlorate, 99+%, ACS reagent
Chlorate of potassium
Potassium chlorate(V)
Potash chlorate (DOT)
Chlorate de potassium [French]
HSDB 1110
potassium;chlorate
Potassio (clorato di) [Italian]
Potassium (chlorate de) [French]
Postassium Chlorate
EINECS 223-289-7
NSC 68505
UN1485
UN2427
ClKO3
Potassio (clorato di)
Kaliumchloraat [Dutch]
Kaliumchlorat [German]
AI3-02907
ACMC-1AHP6
DSSTox_CID_27448
DSSTox_RID_82354
DSSTox_GSID_47448
potassium chlorate(V) (HTM)
K (Cl O3)
CHEMBL3188561
DTXSID6047448
Chloric acid potassium salt (1:1)
Potassium chlorate, aqueous solution
Tox21_302523
Chloric acid, potassium salt (1:1)
AKOS015903479
AKOS025293911
NCGC00256721-01
S290
CAS-3811-04-9
Potassium chlorate [UN1485] [Oxidizer]
EC 223-289-7
Q309328
N-Acetyl-L-phenylalanyl-3,5-diiodo-L-tyrosine, 95%
Potassium chlorate, aqueous solution [UN2427] [Oxidizer]
223-289-7 [EINECS]
3811-04-9 [RN]
Berthollet salt
Berthollet's salt
Chlorate de potassium [French] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
CHLORIC ACID, POTASSIUM SALT
Kaliumchlorat [German] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
MFCD00011361 [MDL number]
Potassio (clorato di) [Italian]
Potassium chlorate [ACD/IUPAC Name] [Wiki]
Potassium chlorate Supplement
09.04.3811
223-289-7MFCD00011361
7790-93-4 [RN]
Anforstan
Fekabit
Kaliumchlorat
Postassium Chlorate
Potash chlorate (DOT)
Potassium oxymuriate
Potassiumchlorate
Potcrate
氯酸钾 [Chinese]

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