POTASSIUM SORBATE

Potassium sorbate = K-sorbate

CAS Number: 24634-61-5
EC Number: 246-376-1
Molecular Weight: 150.22
Chemical Formula: C6H7KO2
E number: E202 (preservatives)

Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, chemical formula CH3CH=CH−CH=CH−CO2K. 
Potassium sorbate is a white salt that is very soluble in water (58.2% at 20 °C). 
Potassium sorbate is primarily used as a food preservative (E number 202).
Potassium sorbate is effective in a variety of applications including food, wine, and personal-care products. 
While sorbic acid occurs naturally in some berries, virtually all of the world's supply of sorbic acid, from which potassium sorbate is derived, is manufactured synthetically.

Uses of Potassium sorbate:
Potassium sorbate is used to inhibit molds and yeasts in many foods, such as cheese, wine, yogurt, dried meats, apple cider, rehydrated fruits, soft drinks and fruit drinks, and baked goods.
Potassium sorbate is used in the preparation of items such as hotcake syrup and milkshakes served by fast-food restaurants such as McDonald's.
Potassium sorbate can also be found in the ingredients list of many dried fruit products. 
In addition, herbal dietary supplement products generally contain potassium sorbate, which acts to prevent mold and microbes and to increase shelf life. 
Potassium sorbate is used in quantities at which no adverse health effects are known, over short periods of time.
Labeling of this preservative on ingredient statements reads as "potassium sorbate" or "E202". 
Also, Potassium sorbate is used in many personal-care products to inhibit the development of microorganisms for shelf stability. 
Some manufacturers are using this preservative as a replacement for parabens. 
Tube feeding of potassium sorbate reduces the gastric burden of pathogenic bacteria.

Also known as "wine stabilizer", potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid when added to wine. 
Potassium sorbate serves two purposes. 
When active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate renders any surviving yeast incapable of multiplying. 
Yeast living at that moment can continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die, no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. 
When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when Potassium sorbate is used in conjunction with potassium metabisulfite. 
Potassium sorbate is primarily used with sweet wines, sparkling wines, and some hard ciders, but may be added to table wines, which exhibit difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining.

Some molds (notably some Trichoderma and Penicillium strains) and yeasts are able to detoxify sorbates by decarboxylation, producing piperylene (1,3-pentadiene). 
The pentadiene manifests as a typical odor of kerosene or petroleum.
Potassium sorbate (K-sorbate) is a food preservative commonly used in the baking industry to prevent mold, yeast, and microbes. 
Potassium sorbate is often used in cakes and icings, beverage syrups, cheese, dried fruits, margarine, pie fillings, wine, etc. at concentrations dependent on the specific application.
Potassium sorbate is a water soluble ingredient with molecular formula, C6H7KO2. 
K-sorbate is commercially available in the form of powder or pellets. 
Potassium sorbate is effective at pH up to 6 but drops rapidly at higher levels.

What is potassium sorbate?
Potassium sorbate is a chemical additive. 
Potassium sorbate’s widely used as a preservative in foods, drinks, and personal care products. 
Potassium sorbate is an odorless and tasteless salt synthetically produced from sorbic acid and potassium hydroxide.
Potassium sorbate prolongs the shelf life of foods by stopping the growth of mold, yeast, and fungi. 
Potassium sorbate was discovered in the 1850s by the French, who derived it from berries of the mountain ash tree. 
Potassium sorbates safety and uses as a preservative have been researched for the last fifty years. 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes Potassium sorbate as generally safe when used appropriately.

DESCRIPTION AND USES of Potassium sorbate:
Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, an organic compound. 
Although primarily Potassium sorbate is used as a food preservative, potassium sorbate is effective in a wide variety of applications such as wine and personal care products.

When used as a food preservative, potassium sorbate inhibits the growth of mold, yeast and other microorganisms for shelf life stability. 
Potassium sorbate is often used in foods such as cheese, dried fruit, yogurt, pet foods, dried meats, soft drinks, and baked goods.

TYPES of Potassium sorbate:
Potassium Sorbate Granular
Potassium Sorbate Powder
Potassium Sorbate Beads

Potassium Sorbate was first discoverd as sorbic acid and derived from the Mountain Ash Tree (sorbus amercanus). 
Potassium sorbate is a Naturally occuring," unsaturated fatty acid , and is "completely safe with regard to health. 
According to many sources Potassium Sorbate, has the lowest potential for allergies in food" as well, when used as a food preservative.
Potassum Sorbate is typically used at a rate of from 0.5 - 1.0% depending on the application.
Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, and is much more soluble in water than the acid. 
Potassium sorbate will produce sorbic acid once it is dissolved in water.
Potassium Sorbate is the most widely used preservative in the world. 
Potassium sorbate is effective up to pH 6.5. 
The effectiveness increases as the pH decreases.
Potassium sorbate has just at 74% of the antimicrobial activity of the sorbic acid.
Potassium sorbate is very effective against yeasts, molds, and select bacteria, and is widely used at 0.025 to 0.10 % levels in many food and beverage products as well as personal care products like lotions and creams.

In wine processing, sorbates are used to prevent refermentation. 
Maximum level allowable by law is 0.1% (check this yourself please). 
The addition of sodium benzoate and/or potassium sorbate to a food product will raise the pH by approximately 0.1 to 0.5 pH units depending on the amount, pH, and type of product. 
Additional adjustment of the pH might be needed to keep the pH at a safe level.
In some products, sorbate and benzoate are used together to provide greater protection against a wider variety of microorganisms. 
This only makes sense if the pH of Potassium sorbate is below 4.5. 
When using any preservative, Potassium sorbate's use must be declared in the list of ingredients on the label, along with a short explanation of intended use, such as "preservative," "mold inhibitor," or "to retard spoilage," etc.
Always dissolve the potassium sorbate in to your water phase at the beginning of the formulation, to ensure proper distribution within your product.
At proper usage level this is the most effective and cost effective preservative. 
Potassium sorbate is often used in foods like cheeses, meats, yogurt, and wine, little or no noticeable flavor at proper usage rate.
Potassium sorbate is also used often in personal care products like creams, lotions, sunscreen, and makeup.

Origin
Potassium sorbate is produced by combining potassium hydroxide and sorbic acid to create a potassium salt. 
Sorbic acid is naturally present in the lactone form in berries such as rowan berries, Sorbus aucuparia L, which it was first isolated from. 
Some fruits such as cranberries, currants, strawberries naturally contain sorbic acid.

Commercial production
Sorbic acid is commercially produced using the ketene–crotonaldehyde condensation method. 
Potassium sorbate is purified by treating sorbic acid with sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and activated carbon. 
The potassium salt can be produced from batch or sorbic acid production streams prior to drying. 
Potassium sorbate is further granulated by extrusion and palletization.

Function
Similar to other sorbates, K-sorbate can:
-Inhibit microbial growth by changing the cell membrane morphology and integrity.
-Disrupt the transport functions and metabolic activity.
-Be more effective than other preservatives, such as calcium propionate and sodium benzoate in inhibiting mold growth in bakery products.
-Increase the product shelf life with limited impact on food quality. 
If used at very high concentration, Potassium sorbate can have an undesirable effect on taste and flavor.

Applications of Potassium sorbate:
K-sorbate is typically used in chemically-leavened products (dry blended with the flour) at a level of 0.03% to 0.4% of the batter weight. 
Because of Potassium sorbates deteriorative effect on yeast cells, K-sorbate can reduce loaf volume and generate a sticky dough that is difficult to process, therefore, it is not suitable for bread baking. 
K-sorbate can also be sprayed onto product surfaces after baking such as the case with tortillas.

What is potassium sorbate found in?
You’ll find potassium sorbate on the list of ingredients for many common foods. 
Potassium sorbate’s a popular preservative because Potassium sorbate’s effective and doesn’t change the qualities of a product, such as taste, smell, or appearance. 
Potassium sorbate’s also water-soluble, and Potassium sorbate works at room temperature.

You may find Potassium sorbate added to many food products, such as:
-apple cider
-baked goods
-canned fruits and vegetables
-cheeses
-dried meats
-dried fruit
-ice cream
-pickles
-soft drinks and juices
-wine
-yogurt

Uses of Potassium Sorbate
Potassium sorbate is a chemical that is added to food to help prevent the growth of fungi and mold. 
Potassium sorbate can be used in a wide range of foods without breaking down and it has no taste or smell, making it a popular food additive.

Food Preservative: Potassium sorbate is used particularly in foods that are stored at room temperature or that are precooked, such as canned fruits and vegetables, canned fish, dried meat, and desserts. 
Potassium sorbate’s also commonly used in food that is prone to mold growth, such as dairy products like cheese, yogurt, and ice cream. 
Many foods that are not fresh rely on potassium sorbate and other preservatives to keep them from spoiling. 
In general, potassium sorbate in food is very common.

Winemaking: Potassium sorbate is also commonly used in winemaking, to prevent wine from losing its flavor. 
Without a preservative, the fermentation process in wine would continue and cause the flavor to change. 
Soft drinks, juices, and sodas also often use potassium sorbate as a preservative.

Beauty Products: While the chemical is common in food, there are many other potassium sorbate uses. 
Many beauty products are also prone to mold growth and use the preservative to extend the life of skin and haircare products. 
Potassium sorbate is very likely that your shampoo, hair spray, or skin cream contains potassium sorbate.

Specific Uses of Potassium sorbate:
“When dissolved in water, potassium sorbate ionizes to form sorbic acid which is effective against yeasts, molds, and select bacteria, and is widely used at 250 ppm to 1000 ppm levels in cheeses, dips, yogurt, sour cream, bread, cakes, pies and fillings, baking mixes, doughs, icings, fudges, toppings, beverages, margarine, salads, fermented and acidified vegetables, olives, fruit products, dressings, smoked and salted fish, confections and mayonnaise. 
In many food products, sorbate and sodium benzoate are used together to provide greater protection against a wider variety of microorganisms (synergism).” 
“Although the minimum inhibatory concentration for many fungi and bacteria is approx. 
100 ppm, common usage levels range from 0.5 - 1.0%.” 
“Sorbic acid is widely used to inhibit yeast and mould growth in a variety of foods including cheese, baked products and wine. 
Potassium sorbate may be added directly to the food, or incorporated into the packaging method, usually at a concentration of 0.3% by weight of the food and at such values, contributes no flavour.”
“Furthermore, fur animal feed may be acidified intentionally when prolonged storage and improved hygienic quality of the wet feed are desired. 
This may be done by adding 0.3 - 0.6% of formic acid into the wet diet when mixing. 
Additionally, the feed may be acidified in order to alleviate urination problems with calculi.”

Action:
“Unfortunately, grain and feed provides an ideal environment for molds to proliferate. 
Raw materials or feeds in bulk storage are rich sources of energy, proteins and moisture and, thus, are highly conducive to mold growth.”
“Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, and is much more soluble in water than the acid. 
Potassium sorbate will produce sorbic acid once it is dissolved in water and is the most widely used food preservative in the world. 
Potassium sorbate is effective up to pH 6.5 but effectiveness increases as the pH decreases. 
Potassium sorbate has about 74% of the antimicrobial activity of the sorbic acid, thus requiring higher concentrations to obtain the same results that pure sorbic acid provides. 
Potassium sorbate is effective against yeasts, molds, and select bacteria, and is widely used at 0.025 to 0.10 % levels in cheeses, dips, yogurt, sour cream, bread, cakes, pies and fillings, baking mixes, doughs, icings, fudges, toppings, 

How is Potassium Sorbate made?
Potassium sorbate can be commercially synthesized by neutralizing sorbic acid (E200, also a food preservative, can be naturally found in berries, but the commercial one is made from chemical synthesis) with potassium hydroxide.

Here is the brief four steps manufacturing process:
Condensation reaction: obtain polymeric ester of 3-hydroxy-4-hexenoic acid by the condensation between ketene and crotonaldehyde. 
The following is the reaction equation: H2C=C=O + CH3–CH=CH–CHO = CH3CH=CH−CH=CH−COOH
Decomposition: decompose the polyester to produce sorbic acid.
Purification: through activated carbon, distillation, recrystallization or other processes.
neutralization with potassium hydroxide.

How does Potassium Sorbate work as a Preservative?
Potassium sorbate is an inhibitor of both yeasts and moulds, also active for several bacteria but less effective. 
Potassium sorbate is the sorbic acid (active form) that has the inhibitory activity which is generated after the ionization of potassium sorbate in water. 

Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid. 
Potassium sorbates primary use is as a preservative, and can be used to retard re-fermentation.
Potassium sorbate inhibits microbial growth by changing the cell membrane morphology, integrity and function and then disrupting the transport functions and metabolic activity.
This mechanism of preservation is similar to sodium benzoate, but different with that of nisin and natamycin.

WHAT IS POTASSIUM SORBATE
Potassium sorbate is a chemical additive widely used as a preservative in foods, drinks, and personal care products. 
Potassium sorbate is an odourless and tasteless salt synthetically produced from sorbic acid and potassium hydroxide.

Synonyms: E202, 2, 4 - Hexadenoic acid, Potassium salt, Sorbic acid, Potassium salt
INCI: Potassium Sorbate
Chemical Formula: C6H7KO2
CAS Number: 24634-61-5

Chemical formula: C6H7KO2
Molar mass: 150.218 g·mol−1
Appearance: White crystals
Odor: Yes
Density: 1.363 g/cm3
Melting point: 270 °C (518 °F; 543 K) decomposes
Solubility in water: 58.5 g/100 mL (100 °C)
Solubility in other solvents:    
Soluble in ethanol, propylene glycol
Slightly soluble in acetone
Very slightly soluble in chloroform, corn oil, ether
Insoluble in benzene

Potassium sorbate is used as an antimicrobial and preservative in personal care items, as well, such as:
-eyeshadow and other cosmetics
-shampoos and moisturizers
-contact lens solution
-Potassium sorbate is also approved for safe use as a preservative in moist cat and dog foods and in other animal feed.

Production
Potassium sorbate is produced industrially by neutralizing sorbic acid with potassium hydroxide. 
The precursor sorbic acid is produced in a two-step process via the condensation of crotonaldehyde and ketene.

Is potassium sorbate safe to eat?
Regulatory agencies such as the FDA, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have determined that potassium sorbate is “generally regarded as safe,” abbreviated as GRAS. 
When you eat potassium sorbate as a food additive, it passes through your system harmlessly as water and carbon dioxide. 
Potassium sorbate does not accumulate in your body.
The maximum acceptable daily intake for humans is 25 milligrams per kilogramTrusted Source (mg per kg) of body weight per day. 
For an adult of 150 pounds, this comes to 1,750 mg per day.

Potassium sorbate, the potassium salt of sorbic acid, is a naturally-occurring organic acid. 
Potassium sorbate is the most widely used food grade preservative and is not a broad spectrum preservative for cosmetic use. 
Potassium sorbate is used as a mold, bacterial and yeast inhibitor and as a fungistatic agent in foods. 
Potassium sorbate is also used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, tobacco and flavoring products.

Preferred IUPAC name:
Potassium (2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoate
Other names:
E202
Sorbistat-K
Sorbistat potassium

Potassium salt of sorbic acid (natural fatty acid) It is the natural potassium salt of sorbic acid, which when dissolved in water based products is effective against yeasts, molds and select bacteria. 
Requires pH of product to be below 6 to be effective Add to the water phase of formulations at a temperature below 60°C (140°F)
We recommend using Potassium Sorbate as a secondary preservative - Potassium Sorbate is not a broad spectrum preservative for cosmetics; however it can be combined our Leucidal Line of Products or with other preservatives. 
Although Potassium Sorbate is a food grade product, it is packaged as Cosmetic Grade Raw Material only. 
External use only.

Foods That Contain Potassium Sorbate
Potassium sorbate is found in a wide variety of packaged and treated products, including:
-Processed and cured or smoked meats
-Dairy products like cheeses, dips, yogurt and sour cream
-Baked goods, including bread, cakes, pies and fillings, baking mixes, doughs, icings, fudges, toppings
-Beverages including ciders, juices and sodas
-Condiments including margarine, mayonnaise, dressings and oils
-Smoked and salted fish
-Cereals and snack foods

What Is Potassium Sorbate?
Potassium sorbate is a man-made, chemical preservative that has been used for almost 200 years to protect food, drinks and personal care products from being spoiled by fungi (such as mold), bacteria and other microorganisms, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Today, most potassium sorbate is made in labs and comes in the form of white crystals or powder, per a paper in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 
Potassium sorbate also has no odor or taste, which makes it attractive as a food additive.

CAS Number: 24634-61-5 
CHEBI:77868 
ChemSpider: 4445644 
ECHA InfoCard: 100.042.145
E number: E202 (preservatives)
KEGG: D02411 
PubChem CID: 23676745
UNII: 1VPU26JZZ4 
CompTox Dashboard (EPA): DTXSID7027835

Solubility of Potassium sorbate:
Freely soluble in water and soluble in ethanol. 
As the solubility of sorbic acid is very low in water (0.16g/100ml at 20 °C), as this result, it is usually made into its soluble potassium salt – potassium sorbate (solubility 67.6g/100ml at 20 °C to as a preservative in food.

PH of Potassium sorbate:
Potassium sorbates antimicrobial effectiveness is in a wide pH range from 3.0 to 6.5), and better under acidic conditions with pH value less than 5-6. 
The activity increases as the pH decreases. 
Potassium sorbate is still effective at higher pH ranges, for example, PH 6.5, while sodium benzoate and potassium benzoate almost lost its antimicrobial activity which are effective to only below PH 4.5. 
However, potassium sorbate will also ineffective if pH above 7.0.

What’re the Uses of Potassium Sorbate?
Sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate are often synergized (combined used) in acidic food to protect against a wider variety of microorganisms. 
Potassium sorbate inhibits the growth of mold, yeast and other microorganisms and thus increasing the preservation time of food products. 
The common preservation dosage ranges from 250 ppm to 1000 ppm levels, depending on PH, microbial types and other conditions.  
Potassium sorbate can be used by direct adding, spraying, in packing material or in other methods.

Soft Drink
Food grade potassium sorbate is commonly added to diet soft drinks as a preservative.

Coca Cola
Like sodium and potassium benzoate, potassium sorbate is the common preservative Coca Cola put in some non-carbonated and juice-containing drinks to protect taste. 
We can find Potassium sorbate in the ingredient lists of Sprite lymonade and Fanta Orange.

Pepsico
Potassium sorbate is used to preserve freshness and flavors in some Pepsico drinks. 
You’ll find Potassium sorbate in Potassium sorbates Fountain Drinks, such as Mtn Dew Kickstar – Black Cherry or Orange Citrus.

Wine
Potassium sorbate is an ingredient for winemaking and some winemakers think that adding Potassium sorbate can stop the wine fermentation process.
Potassium sorbate functions as a wine stabilizer which isn’t added until the fermentation process is complete. 
Potassium sorbates purpose is not to prevent the fermenting but to keep wines from starting to ferment again by inhibiting yeast reproducing. 
That is to say, existing yeast will die and new cells of yeast cannot be generated. 
The yeast will multiply several generations during a fermentation process, Potassium sorbate ensures the current generation of yeast is the last generation by adding potassium sorbate.
In this way, Potassium sorbate stabilizes wine and is always combined with potassium metabisulfite in sweet wines before bottling. 

Other food may with Potassium sorbate:
-Cheese
-Wine
-Mead
-Hard cider
-Dried meats and dried fruit
-Yogurt
-Pet foods
-Soft drinks
-Baked goods 

USE LEVEL OF POTASSIUM SORBATE:
Potassium Sorbate should only be used for the following food item. 
The usage as sorbic acid should be
1.Cheese: Not be more than 3.0 g/kg (if Potassium sorbate is used with propionic acid, sodium propionate, and calcium propionate, the total usage of propionic acid, sorbic acid should not be more than 3.0 g/kg.)
2.Meat products including poultry and game (packaged meat, marinated meat, crushed and meat products including poultry and game, processed rib products, bouillons and broth, beef tallow, and lard are excluded.), whale meat products, processed fish and fish product including mullusks, crustaceans and echinoderms, sea urchin products, peanut butter, cheese analogue : Not be more than 2.0 g/kg.
3.Salted and fermented seafood (with not more than 8% as salt), fermented soy bean paste, fermented hot pepper soybean paste, chunjang, cheonggukjang (limited to non dried products.), mixed bean paste, dried sea food, red bean paste, salted food, aloe gel concentrate, processed aloe gel products (edible aloe gel included), flour paste (Sugar, fats and oils, beef tallow, lard, powdered milk, or eggs are added to main ingredients such as wheat flour, starch, nuts, or its processed products, cocoa, chocolate, coffee, fruit juice, potatoes and pulses, legumes, or vegetables. 
Above foods are pasteurized and formed into a paste type), dressing, concentrated pineapple juice, Mango Chutney (after peeling mango, it is sliced, diced, or crushed, which is mixed with fruit vegetables, vinegar, garlic, etc and processed by heating) : Not be more than 1.0 g/kg.
4.Jams : Not be more than 1.0 g/kg (if Potassium sorbate is used with benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, potassium benzoate, calcium benzoate, methyl p-hydroxybenzoate, ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate, propyl p-hydroxybenzoate, propionic acid, sodium propionate, and calcium propionate, the total consumption of sorbic acid, benzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and propionic acid should not be more than 1.0 g/kg)
5.Dried fruits, tomato ketchup, vinegar-preserved food, sugared food (sugared dried food excluded): Not be more than 0.5 g/kg.
6.Fermented dairy-based drinks (pasteurized beverages are excluded): Not be more than 0.05 g/kg.
7.Fruit Liquor: Not be more than 0.2 g/kg.
8.Margarine: Not be more than 1.0 g/kg. (if Potassium sorbate is used with  benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, potassium benzoate, and calcium benzoate, the sum of sorbic acid and benzoic acid should not be more than 2.0 g/kg and the usage of benzoic acid should not be more than 1.0 g/kg)
9.Low fat margarine (low fat spread): not be more than 2.0 g/kg (if Potassium sorbate is used with benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, potassium benzoate, and calcium benzoate, the sum of sorbic acid and benzoic acid should not be more than 2.0 g/kg and the usage of benzoic acid should not be more than 1.0 g/kg)
10.Processed saccharide products (limited to syrup or paste to be sprayed or packed into dried cookies, loaf bread, ice cream, and other food items.): Not be more than 1.0 g/kg.

HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION:
Potassium Sorbate is one kind of nonsaturated fatty acid compounds. 
Potassium sorbate can be absorbed by human body rapidly, then decomposed into CO2 and H2O, no remaining in body.
1.ADI 0-25mg/kg (based on sorbic acid FAO/WHO 1994)
2.LD50 4920mg/kg (large mouse by mouth)
3.GRAS (FDA, 182.3640 1994)
4.Potassium sorbates toxicity only 1/12 times table salts and 1/40 times sodium benzoate.

Potassium sorbate (E 202) is made up of the potassium salt from sorbic acid and is used in cosmetics as well as in the food industry as a preservative. 
Potassium sorbate is considered safe because Potassium sorbate is metabolized in the human body into water and CO2. 
Potassium sorbate protects cosmetic products from yeasts and moulds and is very friendly to the skin.

Benefits
Effective preservative active against molds, yeast and aerophile bacteria
Effectiveness is enhanced further by chelating agents (e.g. EDTA)
Extends shelf life of personal care products typically to several months
Effective in a wide pH range of (2 to 6.5)

Cosmetics
Potassium sorbate is used as a preservative in cosmetics and personal care products. 
Potassium sorbate is a mild preservative that extends shelf life by inhibiting yeasts and molds, also it can replace parabens. 

Sorbistat K, Potassium Sorbate, ensures against renewed fermentation in wine when residual sugar is added post the initial ferment. 
Add at the rate of .5 to .75 grams per gallon (125-200ppm) in conjunction with .
3 grams of meta-bisulphite (50ppm) per gallon. 
Use the higher end of the range (200 ppm) as the wine's pH approaches or exceeds 3.5 or when the alcohol conent of the wine is below 10%. 
Note: Will not stop an active fermentation. 
Potassium sorbate should not be used if the wine underwent an ML fermentation because sorbic acid (in the potassium sorbate) will react with lactic bacteria to produce a "geranium" smelling off-flavor.

The common cosmetics including: 
-Sunscreen
-Moisturizers
-Creams
-Shampoos
-Skin care and hair products

Potassium Sorbate or the "wine stabilizer," dissolves completely in wine to prevent yeast from fermenting. 
Use in sweet wines, sparkling wines, and some hard ciders prior to bottling to prevent carbonating your wine. 
Potassium sorbate may be added to table wines which exhibit difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining. 
When added to wine, potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid, serving two purposes: At the point when active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate will render any surviving yeast incapable of multiplying. 
Yeast living at that moment will be permitted to continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. 
When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when used in conjunction with potassium metabisulfite. 
Please note: this product will not stop an active fermentation. 
Use 1/2 tsp. per gallon.

Feed
Potassium sorbate can also be safely used as a preservative in feed, such as in animal food for pigs, poultry, cat and dog food.

Is Potassium Sorbate Safe to Eat?
Yes, Potassium sorbate has been approved as a safe ingredient by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), as well as Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). 

Metabolism:
Potassium sorbate is the salt of unsaturated fatty acids that participate in fat metabolism and finally metabolized into water and CO2 in the human body. 

FDA:
Potassium sorbate is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a chemical preservative when used in accordance with good manufacturing practice.

Potassium sorbate is the common name for potassium (2E,4E)-2,4-hexadienoate 1). 
The predominant use of potassium sorbate is as food additive (E 202) as mold and yeast inhibitor. 
Potassium sorbate (E 202) is used as a antimicrobial and fungistatic agent and preservative in foods, especially cheeses (unripened, ripened and whey cheese and cheese products), citrus fruits, chewing gum, processed potato products, potato gnocchi, meat pâté, processed meat, processed fish, processed eggs (dehydrated and concentrated frozen eggs), table-top sweeteners in liquid form, protein products, dietary foods for weight control, salads, fruit nectars, beer, wine, fruit wine and made wine, mead, aromatised wines and aromatised wine-based drinks and cocktails, potato-, cereal-, flour- or starch-based snacks, desserts and food supplements and processed nuts. 
Potassium sorbate has been also used as medication and in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. 
Potassium sorbate is also approved as a biocidal active substance.

How much to use:
Approved with the following concentration:
Cheeses < 0.3%
Fruit Butter & Art Sw Jelly & Preserves < 0.1%
Margarine & Oleomargarine < 0.1% or 0.2% total in combination w/other preservatives

Potassium sorbate is used to inhibit molds and yeasts in many foods, such as cheese, wine, yogurt, dried meats, apple cider and baked goods. 
Potassium sorbate can also be found in the ingredients list of many dried fruit products. 
In addition, herbal dietary supplement products generally contain potassium sorbate, which acts to prevent mold and microbes and to increase shelf life, and is used in quantities at which there are no known adverse health effects. 
Labeling of this preservative reads as 'potassium sorbate' on the ingredient statement. 
Also, Potassium sorbate is used in many personal care products to inhibit the development of microorganisms for shelf stability. 
Some manufacturers are using this preservative as a replacement for parabens. 
Also known affectionately as 'wine stabilizer', potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid when added to wine. 
Potassium sorbate serves two purposes. 

When active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate will render any surviving yeast incapable of multiplying. 
Yeast living at that moment can continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. 
When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when used in conjunction with sodium metabisulfite. 
Potassium sorbate is primarily used with sweet wines, sparkling wines, and some hard ciders but may be added to table wines which exhibit difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining. 
Potassium sorbate is the most widely used preservative in the world. 
Potassium sorbate is effective up to pH 6.5. 
The effectiveness increases as the pH decreases. 
Potassium sorbate has 74% of the antimicrobial activity of the sorbic acid. 
Potassium sorbate is very effective against yeasts, molds, and select bacteria, and is widely used at 0.025 to 0.10 % levels in many food and beverage products as well as personal care products like lotions and creams.

Why do you add sulfites to wine?
There are two types of sulfites, also known as sulfur dioxide: natural and added. 
Natural sulfites are just that, totally natural compounds produced during fermentation. 
And you cannot escape them. 
Added sulfites preserve freshness and protect wine from oxidation, and unwanted bacteria and yeasts.

How much potassium sorbate should I use?
Potassium sorbate, aka “stabilizer,” prevents renewed fermentation in wine that is to be bottled and/or sweetened. 
Use 1/2 teaspoon per gallon.

Is potassium sorbate the same as Campden tablets?
Campden tabets are a convenient form of potassium metabisulfite. 
That’s what winemakers use as an antioxidant/preservative, commonly called “sulfites”. 
Potassium sorbate is used to inhibit yeast reproduction. 
Potassium sorbate’s used when wine/cider/mead is done fermenting, and Potassium sorbate is racked off of the lees and clear.

How do you stabilize wine without potassium sorbate?
Ale’s What Cures You.

Another stabilizer is sodium benzoate, sold as a chemical or as Stabilizing Tablets. 
Potassium sorbates action is much the same as potassium sorbate. 
One crushed tablet per gallon of wine, added in conjunction with one crushed Campden tablet per gallon, is usually sufficient to stop fermentation.

How do you dissolve potassium sorbate?
Potassium sorbate easily dissolves in cold water, but not in alcohol solutions or in warm water. 
A convenient solution can be made by dissolving 30 grams in 1 litre cold water.

Is potassium sorbate a natural preservative?
Potassium sorbate can prevent the growth of fungi, mold, yeast, and other potentially harmful foodborne pathogens. 
Potassium sorbate isn’t as effective against bacteria, and will need to be complemented with other preservatives, such as rosemary or sodium benzoate.

POTASSIUM SORBATE
24634-61-5
Sorbic acid potassium salt
Potassium 2,4-hexadienoate
590-00-1
Potassium (E,E)-sorbate
potassium (2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoate
Potassium (E,E)-hexa-2,4-dienoate
UNII-1VPU26JZZ4
Potassium (E,E)-2,4-hexadienoate
Sorbistat-K
Potassium sorbate [NF]
MFCD00016546
potassium;(2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoate
1VPU26JZZ4
CHEBI:77868
Sorbistat potassium

Is Potassium sorbate good for my skin?
Potassium sorbate is generally recognized as safe in skincare topical application up to 0.15%1.
Potassium sorbate, not being a broad spectrum preservative for cosmetic and should be combined with other preservatives. 
For example, potassium sorbate and Sodium benzoate are often combined in food additives that are generally employed for the prevention of food spoilage originating from bacteria, molds or yeasts2.
When Sodium benzoate is used as a preservative, the pH of the final formulation may have to be lowered to facilitate the release of the free benzoic acid for useful activity.  
Potassium sorbate is often combined with Sodium benzoate in low pH products to provide a synergistic preservative effect against yeast and mold.

Potassium sorbate is a stabilizer, to help prevent renewed fermentation when sweetening. Does not stop fermentation. 
Generally added to a finished wine to prevent further fermentation and potential carbonation.

Potassium sorbate is petitioned for use in organic livestock production as mold inhibitor. 
Sorbic acid was first discovered in the Mountain Ash Tree (Sorbus aucuparia or Sorbus americana). 
Today most potassium sorbate is made synthetically. 
Potassium sorbate is a naturally occurring unsaturated fatty acid and is completely safe with regard to health and have the lowest allergenic potential of all food preservatives.
Potassium sorbate was also petitioned for use in liquid livestock medications primarily aloe vera juice as a substitute for antibiotics and other various hormones. 
Studies have shown that a derivative of aloe (called Acemannan) has antitumor effects in animals and stimulates immune cells (principally macrophages) to produce cancer-fighting substances. 
Acemannan has now been approved for full use under the CarraVet® label by the USDA.
Potassium sorbate is not officially listed anywhere in the NOP final rule. 
As in section 205.600 of the NOP final rule, “any synthetic substance used as a processing aid or adjuvant will be evaluated against the following criteria: the substance’s manufacture, used and disposal do not have adverse effects on the environment and are done in a manner compatible with organic handling.” 
Potassium sorbate is not explicitly listed in section 205.603 as a synthetic substance, allowed for use in organic livestock production nor is it listed in section 205.604 as a prohibited substance.

Assay 98.0 – 101.0 %
Acidity    ≤ 1%
Alkalinity ≤ 1%
Lead ≤ 2 PPM
Loss on Drying ≤ 1%
Heavy Metal ≤ 10 PPM

Potassium Sorbate occurs as white to off white crystals, crystalline powder, or pellets. 
Potassium sorbate decomposes at about 270°. Potassium Sorbate is mainly used as preservatives in Food. 
Potassium Sorbate can restrain effectively the activity of mould, yeast and aerophile bacteria. 
Restrain growth and reproduction of the pernicious micro oraganism as pseudomonas, staphylococcus salmonella action to restrain growth is more powerful than killing. 
Potassium Sorbate occurs as white to light yellow brown flaky crystals, crystalline powder or granules. 
Potassium sorbate is odorless or has a slight odor.

USES AND APPLICATIONS FOR POTASSIUM SORBATE
INDUSTRIES
-Pharma
-Lubricants
-Water Treatment
-Oil & Gas
-Cleaning
-Animal Nutrition
-Coatings & Construction
-Food and Nutrition
-Agriculture
-Cosmetics
-Polymers
-Rubber

How do you mix potassium sorbate?
Potassium sorbate comes in a granulated powder form. 
Potassium sorbate needs to be mixed up as a 50% solution before you can use it; (for example 2kg to 4 litres of tap water). 
Add granules to water not water to granules.

What is the shelf life of potassium sorbate?
Potassium sorbate should be stored where Potassium sorbate is dry and out of direct sunlight. 
With proper care, shelf life is normally six to eight months.

What are the side effects of potassium sorbate?
Some people may have an allergic reaction to potassium sorbate in foods. 
These allergies are rare. 
Allergies to potassium sorbate are more common with cosmetics and personal products, where it can cause skin or scalp irritation.

Is potassium sorbate a sulfite?
A lot of dried fruit, such as figs, prunes and raisins, may be preserved with non-sulphite preservatives (eg potassium sorbate), and some, such as dates, may not always have added preservative at all.

Potassium Sorbate is a food preservative that helps prevent mould and yeast growth – ultimately increasing shelf life. 
Potassium sorbate is a very widely used food preservative that does not affect colour, taste or flavour.
One of the most common questions we get asked about Potassium sorbate is about how much should be added when it is used so we have compiled the table below with suggested dosage per kilogram of food product.

Potassium sorbate can be found in nature, for instance berries contain naturally high levels of this chemical. 
However, contrary to popular belief, the potassium sorbate that is added to food and cosmetics as a mild preservative is not a derived compound of berries - but rather an identical copy that is lab created. 
This process is similar to the vitamins and other nutritional supplements that people take - as those are generally "man made" as well.
Many natural and fresh food companies (fresh salsa immediately comes to mind), use potassium sorbate in their blends as a reliable preservative system. 
The same concept applies to cosmetics and toiletries. 
Potassium sorbate does like a more neutral pH level, so we recommend staying within the 4.0 to 6.0 pH for this product to be effective. 
Potassium sorbate is also water soluble - meaning it won't do anything to an oil-only based recipe. 
Potassium sorbate can, however, be used for any formulation consisting of a water phase.
We don't generally recommend relying solely on this product as a stand alone preservative system. 
In combination with other preservatives though, it will help boost the shelf life of your finished product. 
Potassium sorbate has been proven to be effective against mold (hence why its used in the food industry), "good" when dealing with yeast issues, and not very reliable against bacteria. 
So be sure to sterilize your utensils well and practice clean manufacturing guidelines, which is always the first part in creating a bullet proof preservative system.
Potassium sorbate usage ratio is about 0.2% of the water content portion of your recipe. 
Add at the cool down phase, generally when your formulation has reached 80 (or lower) degrees.

INCI: Potassium Sorbate FCC
This product is food grade and can be used for baking as well as cosmetic applications.

Potassium sorbate used for inhibiting mold and yeast growth on the surface of sausages during Dry Curing. 
Unless strict hygienic procedures are followed and a lab created, beneficial mold (such as Mold 600) is applied to the surface to dry curing sausage, there will be lingering doubt whether the wild flora that is speckling sausage is beneficial or safe. 
Using a clean cloth with vinegar/water solution for wiping mold away is often only a temporary fix, with mold re-emerging later. 
Potassium Sorbate will consistently inhibit mold growth. 
Dilute 1 oz sorbate per 10 oz of water and spray thoroughly or dip sausages in solution prior to hanging. 
Does not effect flavor of finished product.

Potassium Sorbate is a preservative that is the potassium salt of sorbic acid. 
Potassium sorbate is highly soluble in water and can be used for spraying and dipping. 
Potassium sorbate effective reduces yeast and molds and is typically seen in margarine, cheese, bread, dry sausage, and beverages.

Potassium sorbate (NF)
Potassium sorbate, 99%
Sorbic acid, potassium salt
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt, (2E,4E)-
BB Powder
Sorbistat-potassium
2,4-Hexadienoic acid potassium salt
Caswell No. 701C
Potassium sorbate (E)
Potassium Sorbate [USAN]

Stable salt of sorbic acid derived from the berries of the mountain ash tree. 
Prevents renewed fermentation in sweet wines and inhibits reproduction of mould and yeast. 
Do not add until all fermentation is finished and the wine is clear and stable. 
Dissolve 0.5 teaspoons of Sorbate per gallon of wine (2.5 teaspoons in 5 gallons), in cool water and then stir in thoroughly. 
Must not be added until all fermentation has ceased. 
Sorbate present during malolactic fermentation will be converted to hexanedienol (geraniol), a compound with the strong odor of geraniums.

Potassium Sorbate Granular E202 
Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of Sorbic Acid, chemical formula C6H7KO2. 
Potassium sorbates primary use is as a food preservative (E number 202). 
Potassium sorbate is effective in a variety of applications including food, wine, and personal care products.
Potassium sorbate is produced by reacting Sorbic Acid with an equimolar portion of potassium hydroxide. 
The resulting potassium sorbate may be crystallized from aqueous ethanol.

Potassium Sorbate Granular E202 Applications
Potassium sorbate is used to inhibit molds and yeasts in many foods, such as cheese, wine, yogurt, dried meats, apple cider, soft drinks and fruit drinks, and baked goods. 
Potassium sorbate can also be found in the ingredients list of many dried fruit products. 
In addition, herbal dietary supplement products generally contain potassium sorbate, which acts to prevent mold and microbes and to increase shelf life, and is used in quantities at which there are no known adverse health effects, over short periods of time.

FEMA No. 2921
CCRIS 1894
2,4-Hexadienoic acid potassium salt, (E,E)-
HSDB 1230
EINECS 246-376-1
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt
EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 075902
Potassium 2,4-hexadienoate, (E,E)-
potassium hexa-2,4-dienoate
AI3-26043
C6H7O2.K
E 202
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt, (E,E)-
Sorbic acid, potassium salt, (E,E)-

Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of a naturally occurring compound known as sorbic acid. 
Sorbic acid comes from the vibrant berries of the rowan tree (Sorbus aucuparia), a type of mountain ash known for its hardiness in cold weather.
Potassium sorbate has been valued for decades for Potassium sorbates antimicrobial properties, and is an especially effective food preservative found in dehydrated meats, dairy products, wine, and pastries. 
Potassium sorbate can prevent the growth of fungi, mold, yeast, and other potentially harmful foodborne pathogens.
This natural preservative isn’t as effective against bacteria, and will need to be complemented with other preservatives, such as rosemary or sodium benzoate.
While potassium sorbate can be naturally sourced, the most common way of producing potassium sorbate is through synthetic methods; specifically, by neutralizing sorbic acid with hydrogen peroxide. 
The result is a compound identical to that found in nature.
Potassium sorbate makes an effective preservative in food, but Potassium sorbate’s antimicrobial and antifungal properties are easily transferred to cosmetic products. 
Since this preservative is a viable alternative to more harmful parabens, Potassium sorbate’s become quite popular in clean skin care and natural makeup.
As a result, potassium sorbate is often used in products at a concentration of up to 1% as a preservative. 
However in recent years, the word “preservative” has developed a strange stigma as something that’s dangerous or harmful to our health – but this assumption needs to be unpacked to be fully understood.

2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt (1:1)
Potassium (E,E')-sorbate; Potassium sorbate
DSSTox_CID_7835
EC 246-376-1
SCHEMBL3640
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, (E,E)-, potassium salt
DSSTox_RID_78585
DSSTox_GSID_27835
potassium trans,trans-sorbate
2,4-Hexadienoic acid potassium
CHEMBL2106930
DTXSID7027835
HY-N0626A
trans-trans-Sorbic acid potassium
Tox21_202757
AKOS015915488
potassium trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoate
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, (E,E')-, potassium salt; 2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt
NCGC00260304-01
P893

What Is Potassium sorbate?
Potassium sorbate is white crystalline powder, pellet, or granule that is the potassium salt of sorbic acid.
Sorbic acid occurs naturally in the berries of the mountain ash (Sorbus aucupario L. Rosaceae).

What Does Potassium sorbate Do in Our products?
Potassium sorbate is a preservative; it keeps microorganisms from growing. 
Potassium sorbate is a common ingredient in cheese, baked goods, juice, produce, wine, soda, pickled products and some protein products.
Potassium sorbate in also present in thousands of personal care products, including shampoo, conditioner, body wash, moisturizers, makeup, sunscreen and other items.
Potassium sorbate dissolves in alcohol and slightly in water.

Why Puracy Uses Potassium sorbate
We use potassium sorbate in several of our products as a preservative, and it is better than harsh alternatives such as formaldehyde. 
The Cosmetics Ingredient Review has deemed the ingredient safe for use in cosmetics, and Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care quality standards.
The FDA has deemed the ingredient Generally Recognized as Safe,.
In addition, several studies show the ingredient is not a strong skin or eye irritant or sensitizer.
Studies also show Potassium sorbate has antimicrobial activities.

How Potassium sorbate Is Made
The main component of potassium sorbate, sorbic acid, occurs naturally as para-sorbic acid in berries of the mountain ash tree. 
Potassium sorbate is often synthesized by various processes.
Potassium sorbate can include, for example, condensing crotonaldehyde and acetic or malonic acid in pyridine solution, condensing crotonaldehyde and ketene in the presence of boron trifluoride, and other processes.
Potassium sorbate is manufactured by reacting sorbic acid with an equimolar portion of potassium hydroxide. 
The manufacturer then crystallizes the resulting potassium sorbate from aqueous ethanol.

Summary: Potassium sorbate is a food preservative that has fungicidal and other antimicrobial properties. 
Potassium sorbate is also an ingredient in insect repellents, and it is often used as to prevent the degradation of other active ingredients. 
Formed as the potassium salt of sorbic acid, which occurs naturally in foods, potassium sorbate inhibits bacterial and fungal growth through biocidal modes of action.
Pesticidal Uses: Primarily used as a fungicide, bactericide and algicide. 
Potassium sorbate used as a seed treatment and a post-harvest handling fungicide. 
Also Potassium sorbate is used with various essential oils as an insect repellent.
Formulations and Combinations: Potassium sorbate can be used as a seed treatment with sodium propionate and various polymers. 
Potassium sorbate is also used in a number of combinations for control of
spoilage organisms in food and feed processing. 
Citric acid can be used as a stabilizer for sorbic acid and its salts. 
Previously registered pesticides contained potassium sorbate as an active ingredient with parathion.

CAS-24634-61-5
CS-0102519
P1954
S0057
9207-EP2270004A1
9207-EP2270005A1
9207-EP2277876A1
9207-EP2292614A1
9207-EP2295412A1
9207-EP2295413A1

What is Potassium sorbate?
Potassium is a mineral that is found in many foods and is needed for the body, especially for heart functions. 
Potassium, a chemical element with symbol K, is a necessary ion to sustain life. 
Dietary supplements of potassium are often given to patients who require additional potassium, for example, for some patients who take certain diuretics. 
Major potassium chemicals include potassium bitartrate, potassium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, potassium sulfate, and potassium chloride. 
Pure potassium appears as a silver-to-white alkali metal that will ignite if placed in water, and is usually stored in liquid paraffin.

9207-EP2295550A2
9207-EP2298783A1
9207-EP2305669A1
9207-EP2305683A1
9207-EP2308844A2

Applications:Potassium Sorbate widely used in food, beverages, tobacco, pesticides, cosmetics, etc. industry, as the unsaturated acid can also be used for resins, spices and rubber industry.
CAS No. 24634-61-5
Potassium sorbate (E202) is a preservative used in a wide range of foods including yogurt, cheese, wine, dips, pickles, dried meats, soft drinks, baked goods, and even ice cream.

What makes a preservative?
Processed food is not evil. 
Potassium sorbate helps us spend less time in the fields or in the kitchen and more time doing important things such as playing with our kids or working overtime. 
One of the tenets of processed foods is an extended shelf life. 
Often, Potassium sorbate is achieved by the use of food additives known as preservatives.

Preservatives have been around for thousands of years! perhaps the best known preservative is salt. 
Modern food science has brought forth many new chemical preservatives. 
Unfortunately, some of them may have unintended side effects on our health.

Potassium Sorbate stabilizer suppresses yeast and mold growth. 
Potassium sorbate prevents secondary fermentation in filled bottles, which might be caused by reinfection with yeasts after the final sterilizing filtration.
By using stabilization products, the beverages are microbiologically and chemically/physically stabilized and their shelf life is increased.

Potassium sorbate inhibits the growth of mold
Potassium sorbate is important because otherwise you'd open a packaged food product.
So we should be happy that food companies use this preservative.
Though found naturally in some berries, potassium sorbate used by the food industry is synthetically mass produced. 
No harm in that, especially since it makes Potassium sorbate cheaper than sourcing from some wild berry in the Himalayas.

Potassium sorbate - safety issues
Potassium sorbate is a mild skin and eye irritant. 
However, the quantities used in food are miniscule, so this is not an issue, expect for very rare occasions.

Having said that, two studies have shown that potassium sorbate has the potential to mess with our DNA. 
In one study, PS is clearly seen to be genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes (white blood cells).

In another study, potassium sorbate mixed with ascorbic acid (vitamin C, which is present in many foods), caused mutagenicity and DNA-damaging activity. 
The risk demonstrated in the studies is very low, but it is statistically significant.

Potassium sorbate is the inactive salt of sorbic acid. 
Potassium sorbate readily dissolves in water where Potassium sorbate converts to sorbic acid, Potassium sorbates active form, at a low pH. 
Sorbic acid is very pH dependent. 
While Potassium sorbate shows some activity up to pH 6 (about 6%), Potassium sorbate is most active at pH 4.4 (70%). 
At pH 5.0 Potassium sorbate is 37% active. 
As sorbic acid, Potassium sorbate is considered to be active against mold, fair against yeast and poor against most bacteria. 
Sorbic acid is an unsaturated fatty acid and as such is subject to oxidation (use of an antioxidant like Mixed Tocopherols T50 is recommended). 
Potassium sorbate is also sensitive to UV light and may turn yellow in solution.  
Gluconolactone is reported to stabilize potassium sorbate against discoloration and darkening in aqueous solutions and may be useful in stabilizing sorbic acid in the water phase of a product.

While sorbic acid is naturally occurring in some fruits (like the berries of the mountain ash), virtually all of the world's production of sorbic acid, from which potassium sorbate is derived, is manufactured synthetically, and is a nature-identical compound chemically equivalent to the molecule found in nature.
Sorbic acid can cause contact dermatitis at concentrations above or below 0.5%. 
Studies show that if Potassium sorbate is used at a concentration of no more than 0.2% Potassium sorbate is unlikely to constitute a safety hazard.
Potassium sorbate is not a broad spectrum preservative for cosmetic use and should be combined with other preservatives. 
If potassium sorbate is used as a preservative, the pH of the finished product may need to be reduced for potassium sorbate to be effective.  
This is because potassium sorbate is the inactive salt form of sorbic acid.  
To be useful, the pH of the formulation must be low enough to release the free acid for useful activity. 

9207-EP2308845A2
9207-EP2308846A2
9207-EP2308872A1
9207-EP2311837A1
9207-EP2311839A1
9207-EP2314589A1
9207-EP2316829A1
9207-EP2316834A1
9207-EP2316835A1
9207-EP2316837A1
D02411
A817411
Q410744
J-015607
J-524028
2,4-Hexadienoic acid, potassium salt, (E,E)- (9CI)

Potassium Sorbates physical properties:
Potassium Sorbates as a white to light yellow flake-like crystals, crystal grains or crystalline powder, odorless or slight odor, E202-term exposure to air, easy to absorb moisture, oxidation decomposition and discoloration. 
E202 soluble in water, 67.6g/100ml (20 ℃); 5% salt water, 47.5g/100ml (room temperature); 25% sugar, 51g/100ml (room temperature). 
Dissolved in propylene glycol, 5.8g/100ml; ethanol, 0.3g/100ml. 
1% Potassium Sorbates solution of PH7 ~ 8.

Potassium Sorbates use of:
Currently Potassium Sorbates has been widely used in food, beverages, pickles, tobacco, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, agricultural products, feed and other industries, the development trend, E202-590-00-1 is still expanding range of applications . 
Potassium Sorbates preservatives are acidic, near neutral (PH6.0-6.5) the food is still a good antiseptic, and benzoic acid (sodium) and anti-corrosion effect in PH> 4, the effect has decreased significantly, and there bad taste.

Potassium Sorbates corrosion resistance
Potassium Sorbates can effectively inhibit mold, yeast and aerobic bacteria activity, but also to prevent botulism, staphylococcus, salmonella and other harmful micro-organisms grow and reproduce, but the anaerobic bacteria and Bacillus Lactobacillus acidophilus and other beneficial microorganisms almost ineffective, Potassium Sorbates restrain the development of a stronger role than sterilization, so as to achieve effectively extend the shelf life of food, and keep the original flavor of food. 
Potassium Sorbates preservative effect is of similar products is 5-10 times sodium benzoate.

Potassium Sorbates security
Because Potassium Sorbates is an unsaturated fatty acid (salt) which can be absorbed by the bodys metabolic system and quickly broken down into carbon dioxide and water, E202 is no residue in the body.

Potassium Sorbates stability
Potassium Sorbates is stable in a sealed state, exposure to moist air, easy to absorb, Potassium Sorbates oxidation and discoloration. 
Potassium Sorbates on the thermal stability is good, the decomposition temperature of up to 270 ℃.

Potassium sorbate is a preservative and antimicrobial agent for foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. 
Potassium sorbate is used as mold and yeast inhibitors in dairy products, chemically leavened baked goods, fresh and fermented vegetables, dried fruit, beverages, confections, and smoked meat and fish.
Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of the carboxylic acid, sorbic acid. 
Sorbic acid occurs naturally in small quantities in the fruits of various plants. 
In the berries of the mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia) Potassium sorbate occurs as the lactone, and is called parasorbic acid.
The antimicrobial properties of sorbic acid were first discovered in the late 1930s and early 1940s. 
The potassium salt of sorbic acid is the preferred form for food applications. 
Potassium sorbate disassociates in solution to ionic potassium and sorbic acid. 
Sorbic acid inhibits the transport of carbohydrates into yeast cells, inhibits oxidative and fermentative assimilation, and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation in a variety of bacteria.

Some people may have an allergic reaction to potassium sorbate in foods. 
These allergies are rare. Allergies to potassium sorbate are more common with cosmetics and personal products, where Potassium sorbate can cause skin or scalp irritation. 
However, the Environmental Working Group has rated potassium sorbate with a low risk as a skin irritant.
If you use potassium sorbate as a pure ingredient, for example in winemaking, it can irritate your eyes and skin if you spill Potassium sorbate.

Despite purity requirements for manufacturers, Potassium sorbate’s possible that potassium sorbate as a food additive can be contaminated. 
Potassium sorbate may be contaminated with:
-lead
-arsenic
-mercury

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